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Collection Music for the Nation: American Sheet Music, ca. 1820 to 1860

1850 to 1860

Timeline

  1. 1850

    Angelina Baker. w., m., Stephen C[ollins] Foster. Baltimore: F. D. Benteen, cop. 1850.

    The Bridge. w., Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. m., Miss M. Lindsay [Mrs. J. Worthington Bliss]. London: Robert Cocks & Co. [185-]; Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co. [1861].

    By the Sad Sea Waves (The Brides of Venice). (1850 (diff ed)) w., Alfred Bunn. m., Jules Benedict. Firth, Pond & Co. [ca. 1850.] (Published earlier in London. The Brides of Venice was an English opera produced at Drury Lane Theatre, London, Apr. 22, 1844. The song was sung by Jenny Lind during her concert tour in the United States, 1850-52.)

    [De Camptown Races.] Gwine to Run All Night. (1852 (gtr)) w., m., Stephen C[ollins] Foster. Baltimore: F. D. Benteen, cop. 1850.

    Cheer, Boys, Cheer! w., Charles Mackay. m., Henry Russell. London: Musical Bouquet [1850?]; New York: Wm. Hall & Son [185-]. (London data from British Museum Catalogue of Printed Books.)

    Crusader's Hymn [Fairest Lord Jesus!] Hymn. w., anon. [translated from the German "Schönster Herr Jesu"]. [m., Silesian folk song.] Clark, Austin & Smith [cop. 1850] (in: Robert Storrs Willis, Church Chorals and Choir Studies, p. 193). (The hymn is erroneously believed to date from the time of the Crusades. The German words were first printed in the Münster Gesangbuch, 1677, and published with the above music in August. Heinrich Hoffmann von Fallersleben's Schlesische Volkslieder, Leipzig, 1842, p. 339. Another English translation by the Rev. Joseph Augustus Seiss, D.D., LL.D., published in the Lutheran Sunday-School Book, The United Lutheran Publication House, Philadelphia, 1873, begins "Beautiful Savior! King of Creation!")

    I've Left the Snow-Clad Hills. (1847) (gtr. ed.) w., m., George Linley. Boston: Oliver Ditson [ca. 1850]; Boston: Stephen W. Marsh [ca. 1850]; Philadelphia: E. Ferrett & Co. [ca. 1850.] (Published earlier in London; sung by Jenny Lind.)

    It Came upon the Midnight Clear. Hymn. w., Rev. Edmund Hamilton Sears. m., Richard Storrs Willis. (Although the words and the above music of this carol are now inseparably associated with each other, neither was written to complement the other. The words were published in the Unitarian periodical The Christian Register, Boston, Dec. 29, 1849. According to an account in the Boston Sunday Herald, Dec. 24, 1933, the hymn was first sung to another tune, accompanied on a borrowed spinet, in the author's home at Wayland, Mass. Prior to publication, the words were read at a Christmas celebration in Quincy, Mass. The manuscript is preserved in the Sears Memorial Chapel, First Parish Church, Weston, Mass., where the Rev. Sears was minister from 1865, after leaving the Wayland Parish, until his death in 1876. The music, as now sung, is a lengthened adaptation of a choral exercise, Study No. 23, set to the words "See Israel's gentle shepherd stand," in Willis's Church Chorals and Choir Studies, p. 93 - see above: "Crusader's Hymn." The present compiler has been unable to locate the first appearance in print of the carol in its present form. Sears, in 1834, while an undergraduate at Union College, Schenectady, N.Y., contributed to the student literary magazine the words of another well-known Christmas hymn, "Calm on the Listening Ear of Night.")

    The Spacious Firmament on High. Hymn. Tune: "Creation." w., Joseph Addison. m., arr. from Franz Joseph Haydn. F. Huntington [cop. 1850] (in: Isaac Baker Woodbury, The Dulcimer; or, The New York Collection of Sacred Music, p. 72). (The words are a paraphrase of Psalm XIX, 1-6. The music was adapted from the chorus "The heavens are telling" in Haydn's oratorio The Creation.)

    What Are the Wild Waves Saying? Duet. w., Joseph Edwards Carpenter. m., Stephen Glover. (The words were suggested by the deathbed scene of little Paul, haunted by memories of the sea, in Dickens's novel Dombey and Son which was published in London during 1847-48. Glover brought out the song in 1850. It was reprinted by Wm. A. Pond & Co., New York, during the late 1860s or 1870s.)

    Widow Machree. See 1842.

  2. 1851

    The Arkansas Traveller. (1851) Instrumental. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1851. (This early edition is recorded in Harry Dichter and Elliott Shapiro, Early American Sheet Music, New York, 1941. An obituary notice in The American Art Journal, New York, Jan. 15, 1887, p. 199, of one Joseph Tosso, a violinist, contained this bit of startling information: "His musical war horse was 'The Arkansas Traveller,' which is popularly, though erroneously, considered to be his composition." According to the notice, Tosso was born in Mexico--place unspecified--on Aug. 3, 1802, the son of an Italian father and a French mother; studied the violin with DeBeriot in Paris, and died at Covington, presumably in Kentucky, on Jan. 6, 1887. This astonishing information was, more astonishingly, reprinted in the Belgian musical magazine "Le Guide Musical," Brussels, Feb. 3, 1887, vol. 33, no. 5, p. 39.)

    Home Again. (1850) w., m., M[arshall] S. Pike; arr. by J. P. Ordway. A. & J. P. Ordway, cop. 1851.

    How Can I Leave Thee!--original German title: Ach wie ist's möglich. (1851) (by Cramer) w., m., anon. [Baltimore:] F. D. Benteen, cop. 1851.

    Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2. Piano solo. m., Franz Liszt. Leipzig: Bartholf Senff [1851]. (Arr. for orch. By Karl Müller-Berghaus and published by B. Senff, Leipzig [1878].)

    Nancy Till. (1851) w., m., anon. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1851. (Sometimes erroneously ascribed to Stephen Collins Foster.)

    Oh Boys Carry Me 'Long. w., m., Stephen C[ollins] Foster. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1851.

    Old Folks at Home. w., m., Stephen C[ollins] Foster. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1851.

    Poor Old Slave. (1851) (Griffith) Negro song. m., arr. by E. M. F. Boston: G. P. Reed & Co., cop. 1851.

    Wait for the Wagon. (1851) w., anon. m., George P. Knauff. Baltimore: F. D. Benteen, cop. 1851.

  3. 1852

    By the Margin of Fair Zurich's Waters. See below, "Home of My Youth," and also 1834.

    Do They Miss Me at Home? (1852?) (by Grant) w., m., S. M. Grannis. Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co., cop. 1852; renewed 1880 by S. M. Grannis.

    Ever of Thee. w., George Linley. m., Foley Hall. London: J. A. Turner [1852].

    Home of My Youth (The Peri). (1852) w., S. J. Burr. m., James Gaspard Maeder. (The Peri was an American "fairy-opera," in three acts, the libretto by S. J. Burr and the music by James Gaspard Maeder, produced at the Broadway Theatre, New York, Dec. 13, 1852-one of the characters was Ponce de Leon. Vocal selections were published by Wm. Hall, New York, cop. 1852. The words and music of four songs are reproduced in Grenville Vernon, Yankee Doodle-Doo, New York, 1927, p. 134-38. They are "Home of My Youth," "Thoughts That Have for Years Been Sleeping," "You'll Meet Me-Won't You?" and "By the Margin of Fair Zurich's Waters.")

    Lily Dale. w., m., H. S. Thompson. Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co., cop. 1852.

    Massa's in de Cold Ground. (1853) w., m., Stephen C[ollins] Foster. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1852.

    The Rock Beside the Sea. (1852) w., anon. m., Charles C[rozat] Converse. Philadelphia: Lee & Walker, cop. 1852.

    Swiss Song. (1852) w., anon. m., Carl Eckert. Wm. Hall & Son [1852]. (Also known as the "Swiss Echo Song"; published earlier in Germany. The German words are "Er liebt nur mich allein." The above edition was reviewed in The Musical World and The New York Musical Times, Dec. 25, 1852, p. 261.)

    Thou Art Gone from My Gaze. (1852) (diff. ed.) w., m., George Linley. W. E. Millet [1852]. (Published earlier in London. The above edition was printed as a musical supplement in The Musical World and Journal of the Fine Arts, New York, Mar. 1, 1852 [p. 179].)

    Thoughts That Have for Years Been Sleeping.(1852) See above: "Home of My Youth" (The Peri).

    You'll Meet Me-Won't You? See above: "Home of My Youth" (The Peri).

    The Young Folks at Home. (1852) w., Frank Spencer. m., Miss Hattie Livingston. T. S. Berry & Co., cop. 1852. (Composed for Wood's Minstrels.)

  4. 1853

    Haydn's Ox Minuet. (1853) Piano piece. [m., erroneously ascribed to Franz Joseph Haydn.] Wm. Hall & Son [1853]. (Published earlier in Germany or in Austria. This once popular piano piece was reprinted in The Musical World, New York, May 28, 1853, p. 56-57, as "just published," preceded by the familiar tale regarding its supposed origin. The composition is an excerpt from a musical play or Singspiel, Die Ochsenmenuette, produced in Vienna, 1823, and compiled from Haydn's works by Ignaz Xavier Seyfried, a pupil of Mozart and a friend of Beethoven. The burlesque minuet was not composed by Haydn.)

    The Hazel Dell. (1853) w., m., Wurzel [pseud. of George Frederick Root]. William Hall & Son, cop. 1853.

    My Old Kentucky Home, Good Night. (1853) w., m., Stephen C[ollins] Foster. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1853.

    Old Dog Tray. (1853) w., m., Stephen C[ollins] Foster. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1853.

  5. 1854

    Ellen Bayne. (1854) w., m., Stephen C[ollins] Foster. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1854.

    Hard Times Come Again No More..(1854) w., m., Stephen C[ollins] Foster. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1854.

    Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair.(1854) w., m., Stephen C[ollins] Foster. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1854.

    The Monastery Bells--original French title: Les Cloches du Monastère. Piano solo. m., Louis Alfred Lefébure-Wély, op. 54, No. 1. Berlin: Schlesinger [1854]; New York: F. Schuberth & Co. [1854]; Munich: Jos. Aibl [1855]. (Published earlier in Paris.)

    Poet and Peasant Overture--original German title: Dichter und Bauer. Orch. composition. m., Franz von Suppé. Munich: Jos. Aibl [1854].

    There's Music in the Air. Hymn for SATB with piano acc. w., Frances Jane Crosby (Mrs. Alexander Van Alstyne). m., George Frederick Root. Wm. Hall & Son [1854].

    What Is Home Without a Mother? (1854) (W&S. ed.) w., m., Alice Hawthorne [pseud. of Septimus Winner]. Philadelphia: Lee & Walker, cop. 1854.

    Willie, We Have Missed You. (1854) w., m., Stephen C[ollins] Foster. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1854.

  6. 1855

    Come, Where My Love Lies Dreaming. (1855) Part song for SATB. w., m., Stephen C[ollins] Foster. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1855.

    Hark! the Herald Angels Sing. Hymn-Tune: "Mendelssohn." w., Charles Wesley. m., Felix Mendelssohn. (The music was adapted by William Hayman Cummings in London about 1855 from Mendelssohn's Festgesang for two male choirs and brass instruments. It was written for the four hundredth anniversary of Gutenberg and the invention of printing, and was performed in the public square at Leipzig, June 24, 1840. The hymn tune is an adaptation of the second movement of the cantata, Vaterland, in deinen Gauen brach der gold'ne Tag einst an, for unison male chorus and brass instruments.)

    Kamennoi Ostrow (No. 22 in: "Kamennoi Ostrow, Album de 24 Portraits, Op. 10"). Piano solo. m., Anton Rubinstein. Mayence: B. Schott's Söhne [1855].

    Listen to the Mocking Bird. (1855) (by Milburn?) w., m., Alice Hawthorne [pseud. of Septimus Winner]. Winner & Shuster, cop. 1855.

    Melody in F (No. 1 in: "Deux Melodies, Op. 3"). Piano solo. m., Anton Rubinstein. Berlin: Schlesinger [1855?].

    Rosalie, the Prairie Flower. w., m., Wurzel [pseud. of George Frederick Root]. Boston: Russell & Richardson, cop. 1855.

    Star of the Evening. (1855) Words and melody by James M. Sayles; arr. by Henry Tucker. J. H. Hidley, cop. 1855.

    The Sword of Bunker Hill. w., William Ross Wallace. m., Bernard Covert. Boston: G. P. Reed & Co., cop. 1855.

    Twinkling Stars Are Laughing, Love. (1855) w., m., John P. Ordway. Cop. 1855 by J. P. Ordway.

  7. 1856

    The Arrow and the Song. w., Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. m., Michael William Balfe. London: Boosey & Sons [1856].

    The Cottage by the Sea. (1856) (coll.) w., m., John Rogers Thomas. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1856.

    Darling Nelly Gray. (1856) w., m., Benjamin Russell Hanby. Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co., cop. 1856.

    Gentle Annie. w., m., Stephen C[ollins] Foster. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1856.

    Hark! I Hear an Angel Sing. (1857) w., W. C. B., m., R. G. Shrival. Augusta, Ga.: G. A. Oates, cop. 1856.

    Katie Avourneen w., m., Frederick Nicholls Crouch. S. T. Gordon, cop. 1856.

    The Last Hope. (1856) Piano solo. m., Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Op. 16. Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co., cop. 1856.

    Old Friends and Old Times. w., Charles Swain. m., John Rogers Thomas. Cleveland: S. Brainard's Sons, cop. 1856 by Henry Tolman, Boston.

    Root, Hog, or Die. (1856) w., m., Richard J. McGowan (?). Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co., cop. 1856.

    Stars of the Summer Night. Part song for TTBB. w., Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. m., Isaac Baker Woodbury (usually published anonymously). J. F. Huntington, cop. 1856.

  8. 1857

    Come into the Garden, Maud. .w., Alfred Lord Tennyson. m., Michael William Balfe. London: Boosey & Sons [1857?].

    Flee As a Bird. (1857) (diff ed) w., Mrs. Mary S. B. Dana. m., arr. by George Frederick Root. Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co., cop. 1857.

    Jingle Bells; or, The One Horse Open Sleigh. (1857) w., m., J. S. Pierpont. Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co., cop. 1857.

    Little White Cottage. w., M[arshall] S. Pike. Melody by G. S. P.; arr. by J. S. Pierpont. Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co., cop. 1857.

    Lorena. w., Rev. H. D. L. Webster. m., J[oseph] P[hilbrick] Webster. Chicago: Higgins Bros., cop. 1857.

    Mrs. Lofty and I. w., Mrs. Gildersleeve Longstreet. m., Judson Hutchinson. (Composed about 1857 and sung by the Hutchinson Family.)

    My Grandma's Advice. (1857) (diff. ed.?) w., m., arr. by Edward Kanski. E. A. Daggett, cop. 1857.

    The Village Blacksmith. w., Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. m., Willoughby Hunter Weiss. Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co. [1857].

  9. 1858

    Bonny Eloise--The Belle of Mohawk Vale. w., George W. Elliott. m., John Rogers Thomas. Wm. Hall & Son, cop. 1858.

    Christmas Song--original French title: Cantique de Noël. French words. (?) English words, John Sullivan Dwight. m., Adolphe Adam. Albany, N.Y.: J. H. Hidley [1858]. (Published earlier in Paris; first sung at midnight mass, Christmas Eve, 1847.)

    La Prière d'une Vierge--English title: A Maiden's Prayer. Piano solo. m., Thecla Badarczewska. Paris: G. Brandus et S. Dufour [1858]; London: Boosey & Son's Music Library [1859]; London: Duncan Davidson & Co. [1859.]

    Thou Art So Near and Yet So Far--original German title: Du Bist Mir Nah und Doch So Fern. w., m., Alexander Reichardt. London: Duncan Davidson & Co. [1858?]; Cleveland: S. Brainard Co. [1861.]

    Warblings at Eve. Piano solo. m., Henry Brinley Richards. London: Robert Cocks & Co. [1858?]

    Wedding March. (1854) (harp arr.) according to Percy A. Scholes, The Oxford Companion to Music, London, 1938, p. 1015, the popularity of the march at weddings dates, in England, from 1858. Scholes reports: "The first organist to play the . . . piece was probably Samuel Reay . . . then organist of the parish church of Tiverton, Devon, who in 1847 made an organ arrangement of his own from the pianoforte duet arrangement just published by Novello, Ewer & Co., and introduced it at a wedding in that church. But this use of the music seems first to have become fashionable from the occasion of the wedding of the Princess Royal in 1858.")

  10. 1859

    Ave Maria. w., traditional. m., Charles Gounod, adapted from the First Prelude in J. S. Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavichord. Paris: Heugel [1859]. (First sung in Paris, May 24, 1859, by the eminent Mme. Caroline Miolan-Carvalho, who created the soprano roles in Gounod's operas Faust and Roméo et Juliette. Gounod's music was originally set to words by Alphonse de Lamartine and published by L. Mayaud et Cie. [1852.] Gounod wrote a second "Ave Maria," based on the Second Prelude in Bach's collection, which was published by Choudens Fils, Paris [1892].)

    Il Bacio--known as: The Kiss Waltz. Italian words, Adlighieri. m., Luigi Arditi, op. 97 (composed for Maria Piccolomini, famous Italian operatic soprano singer). [London: Cramer, Beale & Co., 1859 or 60?]; Milan: Tito di G. Ricordi [186-]; Philadelphia: W. R. Smith, cop. 1864, as a piano solo, arr. by R. Wittig.

    In the Louisiana Lowlands. w., m., anonymous. Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co., cop. 1859.

    Nearer, My God, to Thee. Hymn; tune: "Bethany." w., Sarah Adams (née Flower). m., Lowell Mason. Mason Bros., cop. 1859 (in: Lowell Mason, A. Edwards and Austin Phelps, The Sabbath Hymn and Tune Book, p. 244).

    Viva l'America: Home of the Free. w., m., Harrison Millard. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1859.

  11. 1860

    Annie Lisle. w., m., H. S. Thompson. Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co., cop. 1860. (The tune is now the melody of the Cornell University song "Far above Cayuga's Waters.")

    [Dixie's Land.] I Wish I Was in Dixie's Land.w., m., Dan[iel] D[ecatur] Emmett; arr. by W. L. Hobbs. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1860.

    The Glendy Burk. w., m., Stephen C[ollins] Foster. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1860.

    Janet's Choice. w., m., Claribel [pseud. of Mrs. Charles C. Barnard, née Charlotte Arlington]. London: Boosey & Sons [1860]; Philadelphia: Lee & Walker [1871].

    My Trundle Bed, or, Recollections of Childhood. w., anon. m., John C. Baker. Chicago: H. M. Higgins, cop. 1860.

    Old Black Joe. w., m., Stephen C[ollins] Foster. Firth, Pond & Co., cop. 1860.

    Rock Me to Sleep, Mother. w., Florence Percy. m., Ernest Leslie. Boston: Russell & Pate, cop. 1860.

    Simon the Cellarer. w., anon. m., J[ohn] L[iptrot] Hatton. Wm. Hall & Son [1860?]. (Published earlier in London.)

    Sweet Spirit, Hear My Prayer (Lurline). w., Edward Fitzball. m., William Vincent Wallace. Wm. Hall & Son, cop. 1860. (Lurline was an English opera by William Vincent Wallace, produced at Covent Garden Theatre, Feb. 23, 1860.)

    'Tis But a Little Faded Flower. w., Frederick Enoch. m., John Rogers Thomas. Wm. A. Pond & Co., cop. 1860.

    When the Corn Is Waving, Annie Dear. w., m., Charles Blamphin. Boston: G. D. Russell & Co.; Cincinnati: John Church Co.; Cleveland: S. Brainard & Sons; New York: Wm. A. Pond & Co.; Robert M. DeWitt, cop. 1870; De Marsan's . . . Singer's Journal [1871], p. 308; Philadelphia: Lee & Walker; and others. (Published by Metzler & Co., London, 1874-75.)