Collection Items

  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Another dose 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows French Field Marshal Ferdinand Foch (supreme commander of the Allied Armies) holding a huge spoon to the lips of a protesting German soldier. A large bowl of medicine, labeled "New Armistice Terms," sits on the table. As World War I drew to a close in the fall of 1918, the Germans protested that the armistice terms offered by Foch,...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1918
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Herr Gott! A harness-maker! 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a disgusted-looking man, sitting in a chair labeled "W. Hohenzollern," holding a newspaper with the headline: "Ebert Is Elected President of Germany." After Kaiser William II (whose family name was Hohenzollern) was forced to abdicate at the close of World War I, the new German republic elected Friedrich Ebert, a former saddle maker, as its first president on February...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1919
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The show that flopped 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Senator James Thomas Heflin of Alabama as a shabby vaudeville actor walking along a railroad track carrying his possessions: a satchel labeled "The Great Heflin," placards reading "The Great Heflin! Tonight in ... Showing Up of Al Smith, Town Hall," and a sword and spear labeled "Religious Bigotry." In April 1928, Heflin, the fiery advocate of prohibition, fundamentalist Protestantism,...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1928
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The filling station 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a stout old gentleman (the cartoonist's symbol for the Republican Party) standing firmly in front of a gas station bearing a sign reading "Use That Good Teapot Dome Oil." The gas pump is labeled "Sinclair Fall Co." and the oil tank bears a large dollar mark. The cartoon alludes to the Teapot Dome Scandal during the Harding Administration when...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1928
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    His little tea party 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Secretary of the Interior Albert Fall sitting on a rock in the desert, surrounded by tiny oil wells, holding a teacup. Behind him looms the Teapot Dome mountain in the shape of a teapot. A fissure on the side in the shape of a spout emits steam made up of dollar marks. The cartoon alludes to the Teapot Dome...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1921
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    "It's none of the public's business" 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Mr. Dry (the cartoonist's puritanical symbol for the Prohibitionists) holding an umbrella labeled "Anti-Saloon League," trying to shield a vast pile of money labeled "Political campaign contributions." In February 1923, William H. Anderson, New York State Superintendent of the Anti-Saloon League, refused to answer questions regarding the misuse of funds. Anderson was later convicted, and the adverse publicity caused...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1923
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    "Swear!" 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Mr. Dry (the cartoonist's puritanical symbol for the Prohibitionists, labeled "Anti-Saloon League") and a hooded member of the Ku Klux Klan joining hands to swear an oath before a burning cross. During the Prohibition years, in the 1920s, the Klan briefly emerged as a significant power. The cartoonist sees an unholy alliance between the drys and the advocates of...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1923
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Home 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a happy Belgian peasant family greeting King Albert I of Belgium. At the beginning of World War I, Albert refused the German demand for free passage of troops and then led the Belgian armies in their futile attempt to resist the German invasion. He returned to Brussels at the end of the war in 1918 at the head of...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1918
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    "Don't you dare touch my child!" 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a fat man (labeled "G.O.P.") defending an enormous crying child (labeled "Tariff Protected 'Infant Industries'") from an angry Frenchman carrying a board with a nail in it (labeled "Reprisals"). In September 1927, American businessmen were outraged when the French announced new high tariffs on American goods. The cartoonist ridicules Republicans, who had raised American protective tariffs to new heights,...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1927
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The belated Yule log 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a boy on a city street chopping up a discarded Christmas tree, presumably to use as fuel. Comments on the poverty caused by the Depression.
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1930
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Now, where are reparations? 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a French soldier with rifle and bayonet in hand, entering the front hall of a house labeled "Germany." After World War I ended, both France and Britain were determined to require Germany to pay reparations to cover a large part of the cost of the war. These reparations played a part in bringing on both the world-wide economic depression...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1918
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Planning a little trip 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows William, former Crown Prince of Germany, dressed as a poor Dutch peasant, sitting on a wharf reading a Rotterdam-Berlin timetable. William fled to the Netherlands when his father, William II, abdicated as German emperor at the close of World War I. In November 1922, the German government announced that he would be permitted to return to Germany. William, known...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1922
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    "It is later than you think!" 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows an agitated Father Time, carrying an hour glass whose sand has almost run out, accosting a Congressman who is carrying a document labeled, "Bill to Defend Democrary." In January 1941, President Roosevelt, concerned that Britain might run dangerously low on military supplies, proposed to Congress a new program to increase American aid. The cartoonist warns that...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Just in case 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Uncle Sam standing before a long line of young men waiting to register for the draft. A sign reads "3,000,000 Youths from 18-20 Register for Selective Service." American entry into World War II in December 1941 brought new demands for expansion of the draft. Young men 18-20 years old were required to register for the first time on June...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1942
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    A poor scarecrow 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a scarecrow (labeled "Volunteer System") with a wooden sword in a field labeled "U.S.A." A crow sits brazenly on the scarecrow's head and a flock of crows approach. A menacing-looking crow wearing a German helmet watches from a nearby fence. Probably drawn after World War I when Congress rejected a proposal for universal military training in favor of a...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1920
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Predicament of a super-man 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows the Kaiser William II of Germany as a frustrated German soldier, hemmed in by French, British, American, and Serbian bayonets. The concept of a "Superman" was popularized by the German philosopher Nietzche. Before World War I, William was known for his arrogant militaristic stance. The cartoon was probably drawn in the closing days of the war as it became...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1918
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The President's illness 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows two old women, labeled "Cloak Room Gossip" and "Congressional Rumor," gossiping under a parasol. In October 1919, President Wilson suffered a serious stroke that was largely concealed from the public for almost five months. The cartoonist (erroneously) suggests that Congressional speculation about the President's illness is overwrought.
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1919
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Salute from an expert 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows a group of men (labeled "Norwegian Traitors") seated around a table holding a box of money labeled "German Pay." A picture of Hitler hangs on the wall. The men are startled by the arrival of the ghost of Benedict Arnold. Arnold was an American Revolutionary War general who betrayed West Point to the British. On April...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1940
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Refusing to give the lady a seat 1 drawing : crayon, opaque white and graphite over graphite underdrawing ; sheet 50.2 x 37.5 cm. | Cartoon shows the figure of Peace as a pretty woman and angel, standing in the aisle of a train or bus, while Senators Borah, Lodge, and Johnson occupy the seats. The cartoon refers to the successful efforts of the Republican isolationists after World War I to...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1919
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The rights of little peoples 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a Dutch woman, surrounded by her anxious children, gazing out to sea where boats are sinking. The Netherlands remained neutral during World War I, but Dutch shipping was hindered by both German and British naval operations and blockades. The cartoon was probably drawn before the United States entered the war on the side of the Allies in April 1917.
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1914
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The ship of the desert 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Democratic leader William Jennings Bryan in the desert astride a camel whose head and body form a large glass water bottle. The camel, known as "The Ship of the Desert" because of its ability to go for long periods without water, was erroneously thought to store vast quantities of water in its hump. Bryan, the perennial Democratic candidate for...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1910
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Bullets of decency 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows British Prime Minister Winston Churchill firing a gun at Hitler who stands in a pool of blood along with a slathering beast labeled "The Italian Jackal." A large sign with a death's head reads "European Bathing Pool, A. Hitler, Prop." Drawn several months before the United States entered the war, the cartoon strongly supports the British...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Eternal vigilance 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows an old gentleman in Revolutionary War garb (labeled "Warden"), posting a large list of instructions headed "When the Air Raid Comes." A crowd of people in modern dress look on. The caption refers to the often quoted statement by John Philpot Curran in 1790: "The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Nothing more than his life 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows a large thug (labeled "Aggressor Nations") holding a baseball bat, beating up a man who tries to defend himself with a brick. A small man (labeled "Nye-Wheeler Group") looking on, says to the victim, "Say, What Are You Fighting For?" A sign reads "Britain, Greece and China Cannot Continue to Fight Unless the Administration's Lease-Lend Bill...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    In Belgium and yet when she wanted the vote they told her a woman's place was in the home. 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a woman holding a baby as she feeds two children from a pot on a stove in a room heavily damaged by shells. In 1913, a general strike in Belgium forced the granting of suffrage for men, but not for women. The cartoonist suggests the irony that women, denied equality in voting, suffered equally with men when the Germans...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1914