Collection Items

  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Is too bad, no? 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a Red Chinese soldier showing the doorman a ticket (labeled "Truce") for admission to the "Club U.N." Expresses the fear that the Communist condition for a truce in the Korean War will be admission of Red China to the United Nations.
    • Contributor: Barrow, Henry (Henry C.)
    • Date: 1951
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Lie: we haven't any victory silks in stock but here are a few synthetics I highly recommend 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows the figure of Columbia shopping for fabric in a UN shop. The salesman, UN Secretary General Trygve Lie, shows her fabrics labeled "Betrayal of Chiang" and "UN Membership for Red China." Reflects the right-wing view that the United Nations had abandoned the Chinese Nationalists to the Communists and criticizes the Secretary General for advocating admission of Communist China to...
    • Contributor: Batchelor, Clarence Daniel
    • Date: 1952
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The keeper of the light of Asia 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a Chinese communist soldier (with a hammer and sickle on his jacket) standing on the globe (pictured as a huge bomb with a fuse). The soldier holds a lighted candle (labeled "Total WAR Risk") to the end of the fuse, while a small fire blazes in Korea. Expresses the view that the Chinese, with Soviet connivance, are responsible for...
    • Contributor: Duffy, Edmund
    • Date: 1950
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    From this seat to one in the UN? 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a Red Chinese soldier fingering a large bloody sword, sitting on top of a grave labeled "Missing American PW's." Expresses American dismay at the discovery that thousands of American soldiers had died in prisoner-of-war camps during the Korean War. Also reflects outrage at the proposal to admit Communist China to the United Nations.
    • Contributor: Fischetti, John R.
    • Date: 1953
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Heaping rice bowl 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows the Grim Reaper (labeled "Famine") with hammers and sickles for eyes, holding a huge bowl (labeled "China") full of starving people. Comments on the food shortages in China in 1953 and implies that the Soviet Union is partly responsible.
    • Contributor: Fischetti, John R.
    • Date: 1953
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Never release anybody 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a figure labeled "China" chained to and pulling a rickshaw carrying a Stalin-like figure with a cap displaying a hammer and sickle. Probably refers to the Sino-Soviet Pact, announced in September 1952, that allowed the Russians to retain control of Port Arthur. This agreement was interpreted in some Western circles as providing continued Soviet control of Manchuria and relegating...
    • Contributor: Fitzpatrick, Daniel Robert
    • Date: 1952
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Year of the children 1 drawing on illustration board : crayon, watercolor, and pencil. | Cartoon shows a Chinese mother kneeling on the ground to gather a small child into her arms as tanks roll toward them. One child carries another on its back, while two other children pull a small wagon.
    • Contributor: Harrington, Oliver W. (Oliver Wendell)
    • Date: 1979
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    "Where did you go?" "Out." "What did you do?" Nothing..." 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a dejected Vice President Spiro T. Agnew sitting on a pile of luggage with stickers labeled "Kuwait, Morocco, Spain, The Congo, Portug [sic], Singapore, and So. Korea," with newspapers at his feet headlined Nixon-China and Kissinger, being questioned by a reporter. The caption refers to a popular book of the same title by Robert Paul Smith. Compares the largely...
    • Contributor: Ivey, Jim
    • Date: 1971
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The grabber's answer 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a group of men, including the Earl of Lytton and John Bull, standing against a background labeled "Geneva." A gun with a bayonet (labeled "Japan's Plea of 'Self Defense'") has been thrust through a document entitled: "Lytton Report on Manchukuo" lying on a table in front of them. In October 1932, the League of Nations' Lytton Commission issued a...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1932
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Oh, yes they can! 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a Japanese soldier thumbing his nose at a door marked "The League of Nations" and saying, "65 million Japanese can't be wrong." The statement is a paraphrase of the famous remark by American night club queen, Texas Guinan: "Fifty million Frenchmen can't be wrong." In 1932, the Japanese, rejecting the League of Nations' Lytton Commission report which blamed them...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1932
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    "A treaty is a treaty, my friend" 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Uncle Sam sternly lecturing an obdurate Japanese soldier in Manchuria. Uncle Sam is backed up by a young woman, labeled "League of Nations." When the Japanese attacked Manchuria and established a puppet state in the early 1930's, the League of Nations condemned the action and the United States, although not a member, enunciated the Stimson doctrine of Non-Recognition (named...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1933
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    His St. Helena 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a lonely Japanese soldier, standing on a rock labeled "Moral Isolation," looking out over the ocean. The picture suggests an image of Napoleon after he was exiled to the island of St. Helena. On February 24, 1933, the League of Nations adopted the report of the Lytton Commission calling on Japan to abandon its aggressive actions in Manchuria. The...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1933
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The new doctor's first case 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows the new Soviet leader, Leonid Brezhnev, as a doctor, hurrying into the room where the Russian bear lies in bed, his head in a bandage labeled "Red China Split." While Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev was in power, the two largest Communist powers had a falling out. When Leonid Brezhnev ousted Khrushchev in October 1964, there was a brief warming...
    • Contributor: Kuekes, Edward D.
    • Date: 1964
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Fire burn and cauldron bubble 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a large black pot (labeled "Congo") over a fire labeled "Chinese Reds." The contents, boiling over, are labeled "Economic Chaos" and "Political Unrest." The caption comes from the witches chant in Macbeth. In the 1960s, the former Belgian Congo (later known as Zaire) was torn by wars between various factions, some supported by the Communists and some by the...
    • Contributor: Kuekes, Edward D.
    • Date: 1964
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Great wall of China 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a UN diplomat, blinded by his large silk hat, feeling his way around a large block labeled "The Chinese Problem," while Uncle Sam watches in amazement. Reflects the idea that the UN totally misunderstands the nature and magnitude of the Chinese Communist threat.
    • Contributor: Manning, Reg
    • Date: 1951
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Seeing things 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a tiny Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung gazing at his huge menacing shadow (labeled "Domination of the Pacific") cast by the light of a candle labeled "Russia's Power." Suggests that it is only Russian backing that is allowing the Chinese Communists to adopt an aggressive position in Asia.
    • Contributor: Marcus, Edwin
    • Date: 1950
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Some China to mend 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows General George C. Marshall surveying a broken vase (labeled "Our Chinese Policy"). Drawn when President Truman sent Marshall as his envoy to China to see if he could bring an end to the civil war between the Chinese Nationalists and Communists.
    • Contributor: Marcus, Edwin
    • Date: 1945
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    To whom it may concern 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a Chinese man (labeled "Mao's Delegates") wearing a pistol in a holster (labeled "Threats") outside the door to the United Nations, reading a sign: "Check Your Guns Outside." After the Chinese Communists defeated the Nationalists, the Communist government began to insist on replacing the Nationalists in the United Nations and sent a delegation to the UN in November 1950....
    • Contributor: Marcus, Edwin
    • Date: 1950
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The undercover man 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung, disguised as a dove (labeled "Indo-China 'Peace'"), trying to sneak through a door with a sign reading "To U.N. Membership." Expresses the fear that the Chinese Communists would use their cooperation in ending the French-Indochinese War in 1954 as justification for their admittance to the United Nations.
    • Contributor: Marcus, Edwin
    • Date: 1954
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    What'll you have? 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Communist Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung as a magician pulling a dove (labeled "Truce Talks") and a string of exploding firecrackers (labeled "Indo-China Invasion") out of a hat. In April 1953, as the Chinese Communists participated in truce talks designed to end the Korean War, the Viet-Minh (the Vietnamese Communists fighting the French for independence) invaded the neighboring state of...
    • Contributor: Marcus, Edwin
    • Date: 1953
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    [Mao picking petals "yes" and "no" off of "truce talks" flower] 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung using the child's method of pulling the petals off a flower in deciding whether to agree to a truce during the Korean War. Although truce talks began in July 1951, an armistice was not signed for two years. The United States viewed the Chinese participation in the talks as arbitrary and capricious.
    • Contributor: Marcus, Edwin
    • Date: 1951
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    New lamps for old? 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Communist Chinese leader Mao and Soviet leader Stalin exchanging lamps. Mao looks somewhat worriedly at his old fashioned kerosene lamp labeled "Treaty with Russia." Stalin looks smugly pleased at his ornate oriental lamp labeled "China's Concessions." Kerosene lamps were peddled by Western firms in China at the beginning of the century and were a symbol of Western efforts to...
    • Contributor: Marcus, Edwin
    • Date: 1950
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The open door 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Communist Chinese leader Mao standing at the entrance to "Far East Peace." Through the open door can be seen the words "Renunciation of Aggression." The "Open Door" was the name for the U.S. policy toward China at the beginning of the 20th century which advocated equal trade opportunities in China for all. In the summer of 1955, the Chinese...
    • Contributor: Marcus, Edwin
    • Date: 1955
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Doesn't believe in signs 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Communist Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung seated on a barrel labeled "Far East Powder Keg" under a "No Smoking" sign, nonchalantly smoking an opium pipe and spilling ashes. The smoke from the pipe forms the word "Aggression." Reflects the view that Chinese policy is expansionist and Chinese participation in the military actions in Korea, Indochina, and other Asian areas may...
    • Contributor: Marcus, Edwin
    • Date: 1950
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Mao: "I wonder if they're live wires?" 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Red Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung in a boat looking at Formosa which is guarded by a barbed-wire fence labeled "No Trespassing." After the Nationalist Chinese government was driven from the Chinese Mainland, it took refuge on the island of Formosa and established a well-fortified state, supported by the United States. With the caption, the cartoon questions what would happen...
    • Contributor: Marcus, Edwin
    • Date: 1950