Collection Items

  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Endle$$ proce$$ion? [i.e. endless procession] 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a huge parade of marchers, with dollar coins for heads and banners reading "Ten Billion Strong" and "Lafayette, we are here," marching under the Arc de Triomphe. Making a comparison to the arrival in France of American troops, with their slogans, to help the Allies during World War I, cynically comments on massive American economic aid to France after...
    • Contributor: Batchelor, Clarence Daniel
    • Date: 1945
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    His master's voice 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Vichy French Chief of Government Pierre Laval pointing to a sign reading "Bulletin, U.S. Bombers Blast Rouen!" and saying, "I object!" Hitler, lurking behind the sign, says, "Louder! Louder!" The caption is the well-known slogan of the RCA Victor company. On August 17, 1942, American planes launched a large-scale raid on military targets in Rouen, a...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1942
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    To the victor belong the spoils 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Hitler standing on a dock, looking out over the wreckage of sinking ships. The French tricolor flies from the mast of one ship. The ironic caption is a paraphrase of the famous observation made by William Learned Marcy. In November 1942, after the Allies landed in North Africa, Hitler occupied the remainder of Vichy France. The...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1942
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Maybe our Vichy policy wasn't as bad as some people seemed to think 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Secretary of State Cordell Hull and President Roosevelt standing on a pier gazing approvingly at the French battleship Richelieu. In February 1943, the Richelieu, escorted by American destroyers, sailed into New York Harbor for repairs. The ship, along with several others, had been made available to the Allies by the French government in North Africa. Many...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1943
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    If they can do it Over There -- it should be simple over Here 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows a crowd of civilians, waving money, disembarking from a landing craft and wading ashore to reach a goal labeled "Needed 16 Billions in War Bonds." Drawn shortly after D-Day, the cartoon was an adaptation of a widely reproduced photograph made by the U.S. Coast Guard of American troops landing on the coasts of Normandy. Berryman used...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Wonder if that chap's trying to break my record! 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows an agitated man in top hat and striped pants (labeled "Andre Tardieu") going round and round through a revolving door. Another man in a top hat (labeled "Briand") thinks, "Wonder if that chap's trying to break my record!" Tardieu was premier of France three times over a four-year period, in 1929, 1930, and 1932. This record, however, did not...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1932
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Let's be friends 1 drawing. | World War I cartoon shows a belligerent soldier (labeled "France") standing over a battered man (labeled Germany) who has been knocked to the ground. The German holds out his hand and appeals, "Let's be friends." After the Germans agreed to an armistice, they assumed they would have a role in a negotiated peace, but the French were determined on terms that...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1918
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    "Teufel Hunden" on the Marne 1 drawing. | World War I cartoon shows a bulldog (wearing a helmet and labeled "American Army") chasing a dachsund wearing a German helmet. A note reads: "With apologies to a U.S. Marine poster." This cartoon is a caricature of a Marine recruiting poster titled "Teufel Hunden, German nickname for U.S. Marines" POS - US.H02, no. 1 (C size). Teufel Hunden can be translated...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1918
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    [Uncle Sam shaking hands with Clemenceau] 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Uncle Sam shaking hands with former French Premier Georges Clemenceau as he disembarks from a ship. The cartoonist's small signature bear embraces a little tiger. Clemenceau, a forceful outspoken man known as The Tiger, led France through some of the darkest days of the First World War and played an influential role at the Paris Peace Conference. He was...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1922
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Twixt the devil and the deep sea 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows German Chancellor Wilhelm Cuno, in a thunderstorm on log suspended over rough water labeled "German discontent," facing a flag labeled "French occupation" and a bayonet. In early 1923, the German government faced the problems of its own citizens angry at what they thought were the unfair terms of the Treaty of Versailles and the threats of the French to...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1923
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Now we can get down to business 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows French General Maxime Weygand leaving the room, a paper reading "Weygand's Retirement Order (Made in Berlin)" in his hand. In the background, Hitler tells Marshall Pétain, head of the puppet Vichy French government, that they can now "get down to business." Weygand was the Vichy delegate general in North Africa. Hitler, who viewed him as antagonistic...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    "France eternal" 1 drawing : India ink over graphite underdrawing with scraping out ; 39.6 x 52.2 cm. (sheet) | Illustration shows two French soldiers in the trenches during World War I gazing in rapture at the imagine of Joan of Arc on horseback, illuminated by the sun despite clouds, crossing the battlefield.
    • Contributor: Conacher, John C. - Life Publishing Company
    • Date: 1918
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    You're elected, Sam 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows an arrogant French soldier (labeled "France's War in Indochina") holding a cigarette and an unsheathed sword, telling Uncle Sam, who is carrying a large grindstone (labeled "The Cost"), "You can carry the grindstone." Reflects irritation at the fact that the French are showing little gratitude to the Americans who are funding most of the costs of the French fight...
    • Contributor: Costello, Jerry
    • Date: 1952
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Didn't allow for shrinkage 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows DeGaulle completely swallowed up in his huge hat (a kepi labeled "Post-War Popularity"), holding an announcement reading "To my party: Let's fold." Reflects the decline in the power of DeGaulle's party, the Rassemblement du peuple francais, and his decision in 1953 to remove it from formal participation in the political process.
    • Contributor: Fischetti, John R.
    • Date: 1953
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    French toast 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a pop-up toaster (labeled "French Politics") ejecting two battered and burning figures into a pile of similarly injured figures symbolizing the 17 premiers turned out of office since World War II. Reflects American disdain for the weak French political system which featured frequent changes of government.
    • Contributor: Fischetti, John R.
    • Date: 1952
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Meal time in the German trenches 1 drawing. | Cartoon showing long line of linked sausages, fired from cannon, going to German soldiers in trench.
    • Contributor: Fuller, C. S.
    • Date: 1914
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    "As it must to all men ..." 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows French premier Guy Mollet pierced by an arrow shot by the French Assembly. On Mollet's head is a large apple (labeled "33 Votes of Confidence") full of arrows. The cartoon uses as its motif the legend of Swiss patriot William Tell who was forced to shoot an apple on his small son's head. Mollet's government, one of the many...
    • Contributor: Ivey, Jim
    • Date: 1957
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    "Don't you dare touch my child!" 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a fat man (labeled "G.O.P.") defending an enormous crying child (labeled "Tariff Protected 'Infant Industries'") from an angry Frenchman carrying a board with a nail in it (labeled "Reprisals"). In September 1927, American businessmen were outraged when the French announced new high tariffs on American goods. The cartoonist ridicules Republicans, who had raised American protective tariffs to new heights,...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1927
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Now, where are reparations? 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a French soldier with rifle and bayonet in hand, entering the front hall of a house labeled "Germany." After World War I ended, both France and Britain were determined to require Germany to pay reparations to cover a large part of the cost of the war. These reparations played a part in bringing on both the world-wide economic depression...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1918
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    "See any reason I shouldn't move in on 'em?" 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows a quizzical Uncle Sam, standing next to an atlas, in front of a sign with a swastika reading "Vichy Controls Martinique, French Guiana, St. Pierre & Miquelon, Guadeloupe, and Hitler Controls Vichy." Vichy was the puppet government set up in the unoccupied portion of France after the German invasion. The areas cited were French possessions in...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    That's my fight too 1 drawing : crayon, opaque white and India ink over graphite underdrawing ; 50.8 x 38 cm. (sheet) | Cartoon shows Uncle Sam as an American infantryman running toward a battlefront labeled "Battle of Picardy." Picardy was an area of northeast France that saw much of the heaviest fighting in World War I. Probably drawn shortly after the United States entered the war in...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1917
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Who is this Wilson? 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows the Emperor Napoleon as a statue atop a column kneeling down to look at cheering crowds shouting "Vive Wilson" below. When President Wilson arrived in Paris in December 1918 at the end of World War I to participate in the Peace Conference, he was welcomed by enthusiastic crowds who gave him credit for ending the war. The cartoonist suggests...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1918
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Byng! 1 drawing. | World War I cartoon shows an Allied soldier, brandishing his gun, charging "The Hindenburg Line," behind two tanks. The Allies were elated in November 1917 at the Battle of Cambrai when their troops, led by General Sir Julian Byng, overran the German fortifications known as the Hindenburg Line. The Germans counterattacked a few days later, however, and regained their lost territory....
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1917
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    "Swine! How dare they sink my French navy!" 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Hitler outraged over the British attack on the French fleet. A poster on the wall shows a German soldier holding a gun on a kneeling woman symbolizing France. A large swastika hangs next to it. After the French surrendered to the Germans in June 1940, they were allowed to set up a government for the unoccupied...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1940
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Love me, love my dog 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a haughty young Frenchwoman walking her poodle which carries a piece of paper reading "Propaganda" in its mouth. A sign behind her reads "À Bas les Dettes! Les Affaires Sont les Affaires" [Down with debts! Business is business]. France was among a number of countries who ceased paying their war debts after 1932. The French linked the repudiation of...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1933