Collection Items

  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Friendship on the rocks 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Uncle Sam in a lighthouse (labeled "The Watch Against Communism") turning the spotlight on an outraged couple cuddling in a raft. The man (probably Anthony Eden) is labeled "Some of our Allies," while the woman is labeled "Trade with the Enemy." Reflects American disapproval of British trade with the Soviet Union and Communist China.
    • Contributor: Barrow, Henry (Henry C.)
    • Date: 1952
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Cannon to right of them, cannon to left of them, cannon in front of them volley'd and thunder'd -- Tennyson 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Senator Burton K. Wheeler behind a barricade of books, firing cannon (made of rolled-up speeches) at toy soldiers. Wheeler cries out, "The British are here!" A piece of paper reads "Senator Wheeler, Exhibiting Toy Soldiers on Senate Floor, Demands to Know What British Redcoats Are Doing in the United States." The caption is a quotation from Tennyson's "The Charge...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    It'll fly better when that other wing is on 1 drawing : India ink with scraping out over graphite underdrawing ; 34.3 x 36.3 cm (sheet) | Cartoon shows the House of Representatives as an old codger standing in front of an airplane (labeled "National Defense Program") with only one wing (labeled "New Lease Lend Bill"). The other wing, yet to be attached, is labeled "Proposed Revision of Neutrality Act." With a wink...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Walking on eggs 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows President Roosevelt leading Secretary of State Cordell Hull and Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox as they delicately tiptoe across eggs reading "Convoy Issue." Roosevelt puts a finger to his lips, saying, "Shh, boys. Don't break any." In the spring of 1941, German submarine attacks on British shipping rose to new heights. Knox and other cabinet...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    We are just lending this to you, Winnie, you can return it later 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows John Bull handing British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, seated at a desk, a document reading, "Complete Control." A sign on the door reads, "No. 10 Downing St., Winston Churchill." John Bull warns, "We are just lending this to you, Winnie. You can return it later." With the German invasions of Denmark, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, and...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1940
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    War breaks out on an unexpected front 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows trench warfare between the British and American press, led by Minister of Information Brendan Bracken on the British side and Office of War Information Director Elmer Davis on the American. Weapons include sheets of paper and typewriters. In December 1943, Davis formally protested to Bracken that the Reuters News Agency had prematurely published information about the...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1943
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    I want that big one! 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows John Bull, as a boy saying "I want that big one!" as he points to a Christmas tree hung with ships with a large ship labeled "Normandie" at the top. Uncle Sam, dressed as Santa Claus, stands alongside the tree. After Hitler invaded France and drove the British armies out of Europe, President Roosevelt agreed to...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1940
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    That's good stuff, Winston ... 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows President Roosevelt talking to a disgruntled looking British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. Both men stand outside a door labeled "U.S. Senate, Keep Out, This Is Our Business." From behind the door can be heard "Whose oil is being used up? Not Britain's. We've got to settle the matter of landing fields after the war! Who is...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1943
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    It'll come in jolly well for your Christmas cash, what? 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a jovial John Bull presenting Uncle Sam with a large bag labeled "On Debt Account 92 Millions." John Bull remarks that it will come in handy for Christmas. Berryman's signature bear dances happily. The countries of Europe ended up World War I heavily in debt to the United States. In 1923, Britain worked out an agreement with the United...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1923
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    July 4, in London 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows President Harding standing on a reviewing stand as John Bull (the symbol for Great Britain) marches by holding an American flag. The traditional hostility between Great Britain and her former colonies had long vanished by 1923 and been replaced by friendship based on mutual self interest in what was known as the "Special Relationship."
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1923
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Into the wilderness 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows former British Prime Minister David Lloyd George leaving a building (labeled Downing Street) about to set off down a path through a forest. No. 10 Downing Street is the official residence of the British Prime Minister, and going "into the wilderness" is an expression used when a member of Parliament leaves his office in the government. Lloyd George was...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1922
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    [Uncle Sam and District of Columbia man giving Lloyd George the key to Washington, D.C.] 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows the former British Prime Minister David Lloyd George being given the key to the city of Washington by Uncle Sam and a man in 18th century garb labeled "D.C." Berryman's small signature bear holds Lloyd George's hat and cane. Berryman generally depicted the District of Columbia as an 18th century colonist reflecting the fact that its residents had no...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1923
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    You've done great work, Ramsay 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows John Bull, against a background labeled "British Elections," shaking Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald's hand warmly. The British lion smiles with satisfaction. In 1923, the British installed their first Prime Minister from the Labour Party. Berryman expresses the approval felt by many Americans who viewed the British Labour Party as more sympathetic to the concerns of the United States than...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1923
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Jolly well, ol' chap! 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows John Bull, sitting back in his chair, admiring a picture of the new British Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald. In 1923, the British installed their first Prime Minister from the Labour Party. Berryman expresses the approval felt by many Americans who viewed the British Labour Party as more sympathetic to the concerns of the United States than either the Conservative...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1924
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Mr. Bull looks beyond the election results 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows John Bull gleefully imagining former Vice President Charles Dawes with his trademark pipe, and exulting, "No matter what else may happen, I'll have Old Chappie Dawes and his pipe! Eh, what?" John Bull is surrounded by election signs advocating "Put Your Trust in Labor [sic]," "Co-operate with Capital," "Vote for Lloyd George," and "Give Ramsay MacDonald a Big Vote."...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1929
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Time for a new declaration 1 drawing : gouache and ink brush over graphite underdrawing ; 43.7 x 44.1 cm (sheet) | Fourth of July cartoon shows Uncle Sam (with a copy of the Declaration of Independence in his pocket) shaking hands with John Bull over a new "Declaration of Interdependence 1953." Against the background of unpleasantness occasioned by criticism of the United States by former Prime Minister Clement...
    • Contributor: Fischetti, John R.
    • Date: 1953
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    "Poor bloody blokes. On the other hand the unemployment figures should sink considerably, eh what?" 1 drawing on paper : ink over pencil with scraping out. | Cartoon shows two English officials standing amidst war wreckage and beside a cemetery on the Falkland Islands.
    • Contributor: Harrington, Oliver W. (Oliver Wendell)
    • Date: 1982
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    A century of progress? 1 drawing. | A two-panel cartoon. The first shows two beaten-down stereotypical natives carrying an Englishman (in a pith helmet) in a sedan chair (labeled "19th Century Colonialism"); the second shows two beaten- down figures carrying Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev (carrying a whip) in a sedan chair (labeled "20th Century Colonialism"). Compares Soviet domination of the Communist countries to the imperialism of the British...
    • Contributor: Ivey, Jim
    • Date: 1961
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    "It is later than you think!" 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows an agitated Father Time, carrying an hour glass whose sand has almost run out, accosting a Congressman who is carrying a document labeled, "Bill to Defend Democrary." In January 1941, President Roosevelt, concerned that Britain might run dangerously low on military supplies, proposed to Congress a new program to increase American aid. The cartoonist warns that...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Bullets of decency 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows British Prime Minister Winston Churchill firing a gun at Hitler who stands in a pool of blood along with a slathering beast labeled "The Italian Jackal." A large sign with a death's head reads "European Bathing Pool, A. Hitler, Prop." Drawn several months before the United States entered the war, the cartoon strongly supports the British...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Heavy firing heard on the western front 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Winston Churchill and a German officer labeled "Official Nazidom" trading threats across a wall (labeled "Westwall"). The officer says, "We won't stop until we have destroyed the British Empire!" Churchill, thumbing his nose, responds, "Yah! Come on and fight!" The caption refers to the title of one of the classic novels about World War I, "All Quiet on the...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1939
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Time bomb 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows a bomb labled "'Make the U.S.A. the Arsenal of Democracy.' President Roosevelt," falling at the feet of Hitler and Mussolini, the latter bandaged and lying in a wheel chair. By the end of 1940, the Italian military campaigns had fared poorly, but the Germans continued to make gains. In response to this growing threat to the...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1940
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The leader and his cohorts 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Senator Burton K. Wheeler as a pied piper, capering down the road, brandishing a hatchet. His enthusiastic followers carry a huge monkey wrench (labeled "The Monkey Wrench Crowd") and signs reading "No Aid to Britain" and "To Hell with H.R. 1776." In early 1941, President Roosevelt proposed to send additional aid to beleagured Britain through a...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Trying to breast the gale 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Eamon de Valera, Prime Minister of Eire (the Irish Free State), holding a sign reading "No Allied Bases in Eire," as he struggles against a gale labeled "Defeat the Axis." A placard reads "Food for Ireland Convoyed by British Ships." During World War II, Eire remained defiantly neutral, despite Allied pressure and the fact that Allied convoys brought supplies...
    • Contributor: Kirby, Rollin
    • Date: 1942
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Steady 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows the back and arm of a mariner (labeled "L.B.J.") firmly holding the wheel (labeled "Foreign Policy"), steering his ship past icebergs labeled "Kremlin Upset," "New Labor Rule in Britain," and "Resignation of Premier Ikeda of Japan." In October 1964, new leaders took power in the governments of two of the United States' major allies and its main rival. In...
    • Contributor: Kuekes, Edward D.
    • Date: 1964