Collection Items

  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Everybody's happy except the dishwasher 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Soviet leader Malenkov as a dishwasher unhappily viewing a huge pile of dirty dishes labeled "All His Troubles." Probably refers to the problems in the Soviet Union (including the East German worker riots) inherited by Malenkov when he came to power after Stalin's death.
    • Contributor: Alley, Cal
    • Date: 1953
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Salute to power 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Soviet leaders Beria, Malenkov, Molotov, Voroshilov, and Bulganin all reaching for the sickle labeled "Stalin's Legacy." Comments on the struggle for power after Stalin's death in 1953.
    • Contributor: Barrow, Henry (Henry C.)
    • Date: 1953
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Wonder if they have their troubles too 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a thuggish-looking Soviet "Head Spy," interrogating another "Spy," who airily refuses to answer on the grounds that it would incriminate him. Expresses frustration at the use of the Fifth Amendment in the United States by those accused of being Communist and suggests that no such protection is afforded spies in the Soviet Union.
    • Contributor: Barrow, Henry (Henry C.)
    • Date: 1950
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Vichy from Vishy 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows the Soviet representive to the United Nations, Andrei Vishinski, spraying Vichy (i.e. carbonated) water (labeled "NYET") in the face of another diplomat (labeled "UN"). Reflects the view that vetoes by the Soviet government are obstructing the work of the UN. May also allude to the French Vichy government during World War II that served as a puppet after the...
    • Contributor: Batchelor, Clarence Daniel
    • Date: 1945
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Malenkov: But you've got this compensation, you live in the worker's paradise 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Soviet leader Malenkov lecturing to a Russian on the relative cost of a dozen eggs (in terms of minutes of labor) in the United States, Britain, France, and the USSR. The cost in the USSR is far greater than in the other three countries with the US being the lowest. With the caption, comments ironically on the comparative standard...
    • Contributor: Batchelor, Clarence Daniel
    • Date: 1953
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    In his time he has worn varied disguises 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a man (labeled "Slavery") stripped to the waist, carrying a whip with a gun in a holster, gazing into a heart-shaped mirror dripping blood. On his face he wears of mask of a sinister Russian face (labeled "USSR labor camps"), while around him lie other masks labeled "Indentured Service," "Involuntary Servitude," "Press Gangs," "Serfdom," and "Negro Slavery." Expresses the...
    • Contributor: Batchelor, Clarence Daniel
    • Date: 1950
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Isn't he fighting for Democracy? ha, ha! 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Finland, depicted as a young boy, squaring off in the prize ring against Russia, depicted as a rough peasant. Hitler, pointing to Finland, says sarcastically, "Isn't he fighting for democracy? Ha, Ha!" On the other side of the ring, President Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Churchill, gazing at Russia, counter, "He's fighting for democracy." When Russia...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    A modern version of the Kilkenny Cats 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Hitler and Stalin as two fighting cats with their tails tied together, suspended from a clothesline. The cartoon refers to the limerick about the celebrated cats from Kilkenny, Ireland, who fought "Til, instead of two cats there weren't any." In June 1941, Hitler turned on his former ally and invaded the Soviet Union. Some people in...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Ballet Russe! 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows masses of German soldiers with drawn bayonets charging toward Stalingrad, which is in flames. A skeleton holds a paper reading, "Mounting German Casualties." Hitler, watching from the sidelines, says, "That's not the way it went at Compiegne." After a lightning attack, the Germans had overwhelmed the French in 1940, resulting in the surrender of France at...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1942
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Joe sent me 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows a Russian soldier carrying a hatchet, knocking on the door of of a speakeasy, labeled "Drang nach Osten Social Club," saying, "Joe sent me." A frightened Hitler peers out of the peephole of the door labeled "Nazi Winter Line." Drang nach Osten was Hitler's policy of acquiring lands to the east for the expansion of the...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1943
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    This is what I get for thinking I was fighting two other guys 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows a battered Mussolini sitting dejectedly in a barbed wire cage holding a paper reading "Russians Claim They Defeated Italy." Mussolini complains, "This is what I get for thinking I was fighting two other guys." Mussolini declared war on England and France in 1940, but by September 1943, the Allies had invaded Italy, he had been deposed...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1943
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    I've come over to see what this second front looks like, if you'll come home with me ... 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Secretary of State Cordell Hull, bundled up against the cold, shaking hands with Stalin and saying, "I've come over to see what this second front looks like. If you'll come home with me, I'll show you the first front in Washington." A memory balloon shows that Hull is thinking of the conflicts taking place inside the...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1943
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Good luck, Mr. Harriman. Remember, ambassadors should be seen and not heard 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows former Ambassador to the Soviet Union William H. Standley bidding farewell to the new ambassador Averell Harriman who is about to board the "Moscow Clipper." Standley warns that "ambassadors should be seen and not heard." Standley, an admiral and former Chief of Naval Operations, had discomforted his superiors in the State Department with his disdain for...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1943
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Who said there was a manpower shortage? 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows six American officials trying to cook in the same bubbling cauldron labeled "Our Russian Policy." House Committee on Foreign Affairs Chairman Sol Bloom, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Tom Connaly, and former Republican presidential candidate Wendell Willkie stir; Vice President Henry Wallace tastes the soup; and Ambassador to the Soviet Union William H. Standley pours vinegar...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1943
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Who's moronic now? 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Joseph Stalin shaking hands with Italian premier Pietro Badoglio. In the background, King Victor Emmanuel III, standing in front a devastated urban landscape, smiles and says "Who's moronic now?" In 1943, as the Allies prepared to invade Italy, the king dismissed Mussolini and installed Badoglio instead. Badoglio took Italy out of the war, but the Germans...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Pretty good subject for a conference at that 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Uncle Sam striding along confidently, unaware that he is about to step on banana peels labeled "Another Mr. Stalin's Surprise," and "Still Another Mr. Stalin's Surprise." The cartoonist's small signature bear watches in dismay. Behind Uncle Sam stand the Capitol, the Washington Monument, and a sign reading "News Note: President Roosevelt Tells Press Conference That London...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Do you suppose they don't like the Dumbarton Oaks plan? 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Tom Connally and Secretary of State Edward Stettinius looking at a sign reading, "Bulletin. De Gaulle and Stalin Sign Mutual Assistance Pact. Terms Closely Parallel British-Russian Agreement." Connally asks, "Do you suppose they don't like the Dumbarton Oaks plan?" Stettinius responds, "Maybe they're afraid the U.S. Senate won't like it." Representatives of...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Beauties of Bolshevism 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a scruffy Russian peasant, labeled "Propagandist," holding out a paper reading "Beauties of Bolshevism" toward Uncle Sam. Uncle Sam, looking skeptical and disgusted, holds a large cudgel behind his back. In the early 1920s, Russian communists tried to spread the message of Bolshevism in hopes not only of converting others but also in getting recognition from and promoting trade...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1922
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    They always did work faster in Michigan 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Russian Bolshevik leader Vladimir Lenin choking a bear labeled "Russia." Behind him Leon Trotsky, another prominent Bolshevik leader, holds a paper reading "Aug. 23, Former Governor Chase Osborn of Michigan Chokes a Bear to Death." Trotsky remarks "They always did work faster in Michigan." A news item reported that former governor Chase, a well-known big game hunter, killed the...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1921
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    At this rate Joe and Adolf may have to do their own fighting 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Hitler and Stalin confronting each other against the backdrop of the carnage of war. Each holds a sign listing the casualties of the German campaign in Russia. Hitler's reads: "Nazi Communique. 5,000,000 Russians Killed, Wounded and Captured. 15,000 Tanks, 14,000 Guns, 11,000 Aircraft Destroyed." Stalin's reads: "Soviet Communique. 2,000,000 Germans Killed, Wounded and Captured. 8000 Tanks,...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Can't we start something to divert his attention? 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows an old gentleman in 18th century garb (labeled "N.Y. City") staring at a poster, labeled "War News," showing Hitler and the Russian bear locked in mortal combat. New York Mayor Fiorello La Guardia and the Tammany Tiger remark in unison, "Can't we start something to divert his attention?" Berryman suggests that New Yorkers, transfixed by the...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    I didn't say you could keep it 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Stalin as a satisfied black bear sitting in front of a beehive labeled "Estonia, Latvia, Bessarabia, Lithuania, Ukraine." He is approached by Hitler, who carries a bucket and a large spoon. As a result of the Nazi-Soviet Pact of 1939, the Soviet Union was able to gain control of the eastern European countries on its western...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Boy, oh, boy! 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a comic woman (labeled "Dame Rumor") standing on top of the Kremlin Wall snapping photographs and chortling with glee. Reflects satisfaction at reports of dissension coming from the Soviet Union after the death of Stalin in March 1953.
    • Contributor: Bimrose, Art
    • Date: 1953
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Canutesky 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a Soviet soldier trying to sweep back the ocean (labeled "Man's Desire for Freedom"). Referring to King Canute, who commanded the tide not to come in, expresses the view that Communism will inevitably be conquered by man's innate craving for liberty.
    • Contributor: Carmack, Paul R.
    • Date: 1953
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Kalenin, president of Soviet Russia, receiving and listening to the appeals and complaints of workers [...] 1 drawing on paper : pencil, ink, and ink wash with opaque white. | Drawing shows Mikhail Kalinin, seen from behind, standing behind a waist-high barrier, listening to the grievances of peasants, who pass their complaints to him on slips of paper. A man and a woman, seen from behind stand beside Kalenin.
    • Contributor: Cesare, Oscar Edward
    • Date: 1922