Collection Items

  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Good bye! see you next week, Chief 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows President Franklin D. Roosevelt, wearing a hat labeled "Political Candidate," climbing aboard a bandwagon labeled "Teamsters Union" driven by Teamster president Dan Tobin. He waves a cheery farewell to another Roosevelt seated behind his desk, labeled "Commander in Chief." On Sept. 23, 1944, Roosevelt made one of the few speeches in his campaign to win an unprecedented fourth term...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    News note: astronomers study eclipse seven quadrillion miles away 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows an enormous head of President Roosevelt about to eclipse the Supreme Court building. In the foreground, a Congressman asks two astronomers, busy with their telescopes, "What d'ye want to look so far away for?" In 1937, Roosevelt, frustrated by the decisions of the Supreme Court blocking his New Deal programs, proposed adding additional justices who would presumably be more...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1937-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Everybody's behind you in driving that wedge, Mr. President ... 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Uncle Sam watching President Roosevelt split a log with a wedge. One side of the log is labeled "Irresponsible Unpatriotic Union Leadership"; the other, "Responsible, Patriotic Union Leadership." Uncle Sam says, "Everybody's behind you in driving that wedge, Mr. President, and you are doing a good job." In 1941, as the threat of involvement with the world war loomed,...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    A lot of advice on how to keep the home fires burning 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows John Q. Public using bellows to fan a fire while a group of men give varied advice on how to do it. Henry Morgenthau, Secretary of the Treasury says, "Buy defense bonds." President Roosevelt says, "Watch out for Nazi propaganda," while isolationist Senator Burton K. Wheeler urges, "Watch out for Roosevelt." Robert Patterson, Undersecretary of War, holds a sign...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The open season for eagles 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows President Roosevelt as a hunter, gazing at two flying eagles, one labeled "The Blue Eagle," the other, "The Lone Eagle." The Blue Eagle was the symbol of the National Recovery Administration, a New Deal program declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court in 1935. The Lone Eagle was the nickname for Charles Lindbergh, the aviation hero, who advocated isolationism in...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Senate adopts Byrd amendment condemning national defense strikes 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Senate Majority Leader Alben Barkley telling President Roosevelt, "Chief, it was like this." He points to a large picture showing Senator Harry Byrd as a devil, using a pitchfork labeled "Public Sentiment," to prod a man labeled "Senate" into jumping over a cliff into a sea labeled "The Labor Vote." A piece of paper reads "Senate Adopts Byrd Amendment...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Great White Father's day dream 1 drawing. | Father's Day cartoon shows President Roosevelt dreaming that he has received his dearest wishes. Chief Justice Harlan Stone, holding a sheaf of Supreme Court decisions, says "Won't he be tickled to death with these?" Rival labor leaders William Green and Philip Murray embrace. Federal Petroleum Coordinator Harold Ickes holds a sign reading "Chief, we've got oil and gas to burn!" Office...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    "For once, I am going to say for myself what I have in my mind." 1 drawing ; sheet 35 x 37 cm. | Cartoon shows former Ambassador to Great Britain Joseph Kennedy in front of a microphone, carrying a large rolled-up paper labeled "Kennedy Radio Speech," saying, "For once, I am going to say for myself what I have in my mind." A genial President Roosevelt responds, "Whatever you say, Joe, stick by it this time." When the...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The fellow behind says HE's running it 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows William S. Knudsen and Leon Henderson, both trying to drive an automobile labeled "Automobile Industry (Defense Model)." President Roosevelt, in the back seat, appears totally unconcerned at the automobile's erratic behavior. An alarmed Uncle Sam, also sitting in the back seat, says "The fellow behind says HE's running it." Knudsen, a General Motors official, and Henderson, a labor leader,...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Walking on eggs 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows President Roosevelt leading Secretary of State Cordell Hull and Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox as they delicately tiptoe across eggs reading "Convoy Issue." Roosevelt puts a finger to his lips, saying, "Shh, boys. Don't break any." In the spring of 1941, German submarine attacks on British shipping rose to new heights. Knox and other cabinet...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    I can't keep this lid on if you keep shoveling in fuel 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows President Roosevelt as a cook trying to keep the lid on a pot labeled "Prices," while a man labeled "Labor" shovels coal (labeled "Wages") into the stove. In 1941, with the economy going at full blast due to the rearmament program, the government struggled to control prices to keep down inflation. Berryman blames the labor unions for continuing to...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Wait till that man in the White House cracks down on you! 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a man in ragged dress clothes (labeled "Economic Royalist") admonishing a swaggering working man (labeled "Labour Royalist"). An "economic royalist" was a term used for a powerful reactionary businessman. Some people felt that President Roosevelt's New Deal programs had promoted the rights of labor unions at the expense of business. Berryman suggests that if the labor leaders go too...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    You'll never go to Heaven if you do a thing like this 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows President Roosevelt, standing on the shore of the Potomac behind a drawing of an enormous building labeled "New War Department Building," exhorting an old gentleman (labeled "Congress") who sits on Memorial Bridge. The president warns he will not go to Heaven if he carries out his plans. In 1941, Congress authorized the construction of a new building to house...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    I wonder if it's a reprieve or a full pardon? 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows United Mine Workers president John L. Lewis holding a key (labeled "Back to Work Order with Reservation of Right to Strike"), preparing to unlock handcuffs (labeled "Captive Coal Mines Tie-Up") on the wrists of Uncle Sam. In the background, President Roosevelt says, "I wonder if it's a reprieve or a full pardon?" while an old gentleman labeled "Congress" responds,...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1941-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Leon, I thought I read somewhere that members of Congress were not going to get extra gasoline 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows President Roosevelt holding a paper reading "Congressmen Get X Ration Cards," talking to Office of Price Administration head, Leon Henderson. Roosevelt says he thought that members of Congress were not to receive extra gasoline. Henderson responds,"Well, Mr. President, we found out that you couldn't expect a man to be a statesman on three gallons of gas...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1942-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    I'll throw that rider even if I have to kill the horse 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows a farmer labeled, "Farm Price Rider," mounting a horse whose body is made up of a rolled paper labeled, "$32,000,000,000 National Defense Bill." President Roosevelt prepares to light a stick of dynamite under the horse, saying he will kill the horse if necessary to get rid of the rider. The horse looks alarmed. On February 27,...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1942-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Fancy seeing you here, Phil! 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows steel industrialist Tom Girdler, President Roosevelt, Congressman Howard Smith, American Federation of Labor President William Green, and former Vice President John Nance Garner sitting on the steps of the "Lewis-Doesn't-Like-Us-Club." They welcome Congress of Industrial Organizations President Philip Murray who asks, "Is there another chair in that lodge, boys?" He carries a sign reading "Deliberate Sabotage of Organizational Efforts!...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1942-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Welcoming the money changers back to the temple 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows President Roosevelt and Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau, standing on the front steps of a building between large columns, handing out awards to "Bankers" for "Selling War Bonds," "Financing Plant Expansion," and "Leadership in Fight against Inflation." The caption refers to the Biblical account of Jesus driving the money changers out of the Temple in...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1942-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    I think you might tell the little fellow that he can take those dark glasses off, Mr. President ... 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows John Q. Public, wearing dark glasses, reading a newspaper headlined "Gloomy War Reports." War Production Board head Donald M. Nelson tells President Roosevelt, "I think you might tell the little fellow that he can take those dark glasses off, Mr. President. This is not a time for undiluted optimism, but the picture isn't as black as...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1942-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Chickens and peaches are plentiful -- as far as they go 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows President Roosevelt presiding at a dinner table. Labor leader Philip Murray prepares to carve a large chicken labeled "Wage increases," while a man labeled "Congress" enjoys a big bowl of peaches labeled "Farm Parity Prices." The president doles out one peach and a small piece of chicken to a little man labeled "Taxpayer," saying "And this...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1942-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    It will be good for the country ... 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows President Roosevelt seated at a table smiling broadly, surrounded by members of his administration. They include War Production Board Director Donald M. Nelson, Office of Price Administration Chief Leon Henderson, Assistant Attorney General Thurman Arnold, Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes, and Secretary of Agriculture Claude Wickard. Each man holds a paper reading "President Orders Subordinates...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1942-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Another version of "Dropping the pilot" 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows President Roosevelt and Secretary of Commerce Harry Hopkins as sailors watching as Postmaster General James Farley falls over the side of a ship. Farley says, "I don't know whether I jumped or was pushed." Hopkins says, "He was a nice fellow." Farley had been instrumental in getting Roosevelt elected to his first two terms, but by 1940 he harbored...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1940-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    That little vacation seems to have done Donald a lot of good 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows President Roosevelt watching a strong man, labeled "Nelson," bending an iron bar, labeled "Priorities Control." In early 1942, Roosevelt created a War Production Board to manage economic mobilization, but Donald M. Nelson, its genial head, lacked the force and decisiveness to control competing interests. On August 19, however, returning from vacation, Nelson told reporters, "I'm going...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1942-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    In Lafayette Park 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Harvard President James B. Conant, financier Barnard Baruch, and M.I.T. President Karl T. Compton, sitting on a park bench in Lafayette Park across from the White House, looking very worried. Baruch holds a paper reading, "Dear Barney: I don't know where you will find it, but you've got to get us some rubber -- F.D.R." A...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1942-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Seems to be a case of sleeping sickness 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows President Roosevelt and other members of his administration trying in vain to awaken a slumbering old man labeled "Farm Bloc" who is dreaming of money. State Department official Joseph Grew says, "There's a war on and we're in it for keeps"; War Production Board head Donald Nelson, speaking through a megaphone, says, "We're not winning production";...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1942-01-01