Collection Items

  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    [Rayburn, Barkley, and others coming out of air raid shelter on all clear signal after 1944 elections] 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Uncle Sam as an air raid warden sounding the "all-clear" signal as a relieved group of congressional leaders: Senate Minority Leader Wallace H. White, Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn, House Minority Leader Joseph Martin, and Senate Majority Leader Alben Barkley emerge from an air raid shelter. In the background can be seen a huge explosion...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Go back and pick up your gun! 1 drawing. | Four-panel World War II cartoon shows a man labeled "House," holding an old gun labeled "Conscription," tiptoeing up the entrance to a cave labeled "Hitler." As he nears the cave, a little bird cheeps, "Tweet, tweet, remember Nov. 5th!" The man drops his gun and runs, but Uncle Sam blocks his way saying, "Go on back and pick up your gun!"...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1940
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Uncle, we've got a lot of things to talk to you about 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Secretary of State Cordell Hull and Undersecretary Edward Stettinius, holding armfuls of rolled up papers labeled "Post War Security Plans" talking to Uncle Sam, alerting him to the fact that they have many things to discuss. From August 21 to October 7, representatives of the four major powers, Britain, the Soviet Union, China, and the United...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    I didn't know it was loaded 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows an outraged Uncle Sam holding his hip and glaring at a small boy (labeled "Lyttleton") who holds a gun. The boy protests, "I didn't know it was loaded." A policeman (labeled "Hull") approaches, brandishing his night stick. In June 1944, British Minister of Production Oliver Lyttleton provoked a diplomatic flurry when he said in a speech...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Just another day -- to buy bonds 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Uncle Sam pointing to a calendar showing the date, December 7, 1944. Sheets for that date for the years 1941, 1942, and 1943 lie on the desk. The cartoonist's small signature bear opens his bank. December 7, 1944 was the third anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Berryman suggests it be a reminder to...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Sanctuary 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Uncle Sam running for safety in the direction of a voting booth (labeled "Vote Here"). He is pursued by small creatures, drawn as signs with legs, reading "Browder and Communism; Here's the record; The Thousand Club; Support the Commander in Chief; PWA-FERA-AAA-HOLC-WMC-OPA-WLB-OWI; Clear everything with Sidney; Win the War; Here's what was left out; Liar!; Here...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Pretty good subject for a conference at that 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Uncle Sam striding along confidently, unaware that he is about to step on banana peels labeled "Another Mr. Stalin's Surprise," and "Still Another Mr. Stalin's Surprise." The cartoonist's small signature bear watches in dismay. Behind Uncle Sam stand the Capitol, the Washington Monument, and a sign reading "News Note: President Roosevelt Tells Press Conference That London...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    There's one protest they won't ignore 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Secretary of State Cordell Hull showing a proud Uncle Sam a paper reading, "Japs Ignore 89 Protests over Violating Code of War -- Hull." The Secretary says, "There's one protest they won't ignore." In the background, a hoard of people crowd into a building labeled "Fourth War Loan." In February 1944, the State Department revealed evidence...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    And a good riddance, too 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Uncle Sam and the cartoonist's signature bear standing on the continent of North America, watching approvingly, as an Argentine man kicks Hitler and a Japanese soldier off the continent of South America. Unlike most other South American countries, Argentina stayed neutral after the outbreak of World War II. In January 1944, however, after the discovery of...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    November 11, 1928 1 drawing : India ink over graphite underdrawing ; sheet 34.3 x 36.3 cm. | Cartoon shows Uncle Sam standing respectfully before a tomb bearing a bouquet of flowers labeled "U.S." The cartoon was drawn on Armistice Day commemorating the armistice of November 11, 1918 that ended the first World War. Armistice Day was renamed Veterans Day, honoring all American veterans in 1954.
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1928
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The fleet that will finally score 1 drawing. | World War I cartoon shows Uncle Sam, standing on the shore, holding a paper reading "Flying Orders U.S.," and gazing at a huge fleet of biplanes that extends to the horizon. After the United States entered the war, the country instituted a massive airplane building program. The government anticipated that 20,000 planes would be built, but due to various technical and...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1918
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Who's afraid of Uncle Sam? 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Uncle Sam, holding a cudgel labeled "Public Opinion" behind his back, defiantly facing two tough-looking men wearing medieval chain mail armor made of dollar coins. One is labeled "Whiskey Trust," the other "Bootlegger." When Utah ratified the 21st Amendment on December 5, 1933, Prohibition abruptly came to an end, leaving the government ill-prepared to cope with the regulation of...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1933
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    It was a great fight while it lasted, boys, now let's get busy and clean up this mess 1 drawing : ink. | Cartoon shows Uncle Sam holding a broom talking to Franklin D. Roosevelt and Wendell Willkie who are shaking hands while standing in piles of paper labeled "gossip," "scandal," "bitterness," "smear stuff," etc. In the background, a small Teddy bear puts "sour grapes" in a trash can. In November 1940, President Roosevelt defeated Republican challenger Wendell Willkie and won an...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1940
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    You do it! 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Uncle Sam and a man labeled "State" arguing, each demanding of the other, "You do it!" In the background, a smiling "Bootlegger" stands next to boxes labeled "Gin," "Beer," "Choice Liquor," and "Handmade Liquor." Meanwhile, the cartoonist's signature bear is startled as he lets a dove out of his cage. After Prohibition was enacted, most states passed laws to...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1920
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    When will he wake up? 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Uncle Sam as Gulliver, lying prone on the ground, tethered to numerous small stakes. Lilliputions resembling working men sit around him and on him, waiting for him to wake up. In Gulliver's Travels, the tiny Lilliputions overcame the vast difference in strength and size between themselves and Gulliver by tying him down with numerous ropes while he slept. This...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1942
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Mr. Wilkie's argument for changing horses in midstream 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Uncle Sam trying to ford a stream labeled "U.S. Deficit," on a donkey (labeled "New Deal") submerged up to his ears. Republican presidential candidate, Wendell Willkie, on the GOP elephant, prepares to throw him a life preserver. In the the 1940 campaign, Willkie attacked the New Deal, gaining support from those who felt that it had failed to solve...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1940
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    It'll come in jolly well for your Christmas cash, what? 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a jovial John Bull presenting Uncle Sam with a large bag labeled "On Debt Account 92 Millions." John Bull remarks that it will come in handy for Christmas. Berryman's signature bear dances happily. The countries of Europe ended up World War I heavily in debt to the United States. In 1923, Britain worked out an agreement with the United...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1923
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Uncle, if you'll come across I'll solve the mystery for you! 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a man labeled "Gangster" talking to Uncle Sam who is dressed as Sherlock Holmes with a deerstalker hat, a telescope, binoculars, a magnifying glass and a lantern. The gangster offers to solve the mystery for money. In the background, the cartoonist's signature bear reacts in shock, saying, "Did you ever!" On March 1, 1932, aviator Charles Lindbergh's baby was...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1932
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    I thought it was time for that to go off! 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Uncle Sam holding his hands over his ears, while Berryman's signature bear tries to hide in a wastepaper basket. Behind them a large alarm clock (labeled "Hiram Johnson") cries "Defiance of the Peepul!" "First for Americans," "Betrayers!" "Kellogg Piffle Pact." Senator Hiram Johnson was one of the most outspoken isolationists of the 1920s and 1930s. He eventually voted for...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1928
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Flag-Day 1905 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows a happy Uncle Sam marching holding an American flag. The cartoonist's signature small bear rides on the flag pole. A varied group of men (including John Bull and other foreigners) watch from behind a fence. The cartoonist seems to suggest that the rest of the world is looking on in envy.
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1905
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Universal service -- on the farm as well as in the trenches 1 drawing. | World War I cartoon shows Uncle Sam, holding a paper reading "Plans for Production," looking over a vast field filled with men hoeing. The cartoonist's signature small bear joins in. After the United States entered World War I, one of its first aims was to supply food for the Allies. Berryman's caption suggests that he advocates using conscription to ensure an...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1917
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Keep the flag afloat 1 drawing. | World War I cartoon shows Uncle Sam sitting on the shore watching a large flotilla of ships, all flying the American flag, sail away. At the end of January 1917, the German government announced that it would begin a policy of unrestricted submarine warfare on all ships sailing to the British Isles. In March, the Germans began sinking American ships. This...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1917
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    [Uncle Sam offering his hand to outstretched hands] 1 drawing. | World War I cartoon shows Uncle Sam standing in front of a door labeled "Allied Supreme Council" smiling and extending his hand to outstretched hands. Behind him, the cartoonist's small bear holds a valise. In November 1917, Britain, France, and Italy set up a Supreme Allied War Council to coordinate operations, and President Wilson sent his aide, Colonel House to Europe...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1917
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Young fellow, don't take any bad money 1 drawing. | World War I cartoon shows the German Kaiser offering a piece of paper labeled "German Promise" to a little man in a sombrero labeled "Argentina." Uncle Sam, who is watching, says "Young fellow, don't take any bad money." Behind him, the cartoonist's small signature bear rummages through a satchel labeled "Germany's Broken Promises." One of the results of Germany's decision to...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1917
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Diplomatic relations severed between U.S. & Bolshevist govt. 1 drawing : ink ; 34 x 36 cm. | World War I cartoon shows Uncle Sam talking to the Russian bear who is on a leash held by a scruffy little man labeled "Bolshevism." Uncle Sam says, "You're all right! It's your leadership I can't accept." In November 1917, the Bolsheviks seized power in Russia and made peace with Germany. Although efforts were...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1918