Collection Items

  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    A real fire-side chat! 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows General Douglas MacArthur addressing Congress against a backdrop of devastation and flames labeled "Communism in Asia." The caption refers to the popular radio broadcasts to the nation made by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The cartoon refers to the impassioned speech on April 19, 1951 made by MacArthur to the Congress after he was relieved of his command for insubordination...
    • Contributor: Werner, Charles George
    • Date: 1951-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The gold star 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Uncle Sam, hat in hand, gazing sadly at the White House where the flag flies at half mast and a banner with a large star is hung from the portico. During World War II, families that had lost a member were entitled to exhibit a gold star. The cartoonist suggests that President Roosevelt, who died on April 12, was...
    • Contributor: Marcus, Edwin
    • Date: 1945-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Good bye! see you next week, Chief 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows President Franklin D. Roosevelt, wearing a hat labeled "Political Candidate," climbing aboard a bandwagon labeled "Teamsters Union" driven by Teamster president Dan Tobin. He waves a cheery farewell to another Roosevelt seated behind his desk, labeled "Commander in Chief." On Sept. 23, 1944, Roosevelt made one of the few speeches in his campaign to win an unprecedented fourth term...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Any answer yet? 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows President Roosevelt anxiously asking War Labor Board Chairman William H. Davis if there is any answer on the telephone. As originally drawn, Davis responds, "Answer? I can't even get a busy signal." On November 23, a telephone operator strike in Ohio spread to Washington in defiance of the rulings of the War Labor Board. The government...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    You pushed him in! I did not. You pushed him in. 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows President Roosevelt and an old man symbolizing Congress standing on a dock quarreling and ignoring John Q. Public, labeled "Tax Payer," who is drowning. They accuse each other of pushing him in and fail to throw him a life preserver labeled "Tax Clarification." In February 1944, the president vetoed a tax bill that gave him only...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    General, that's Falla [sic], he's demonstrating what happens when the tail tries to wag the dog 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows President Roosevelt explaining the wild gyrations of his little dog Fala to Free French General Charles de Gaulle. Roosevelt's antipathy for de Gaulle was widely known. The president viewed the general as a prima donna and questioned his claims to represent the French people still under German control. After the Allies invaded Normandy, however, it became...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Under the more abundant life, there would be something for a Vice President 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Vice President Henry Wallace gazing wistfully at a sign indicating that there are 677 delegates "pledged or claimed" for Roosevelt. With only 589 "needed to nominate," Roosevelt has a surplus of 88. Wallace says, "Under the more abundant life, there would be something for a vice president." Before becoming vice president, Wallace had made his name as a visionary...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    You must tell the Commander in Chief immediately 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Robert Hannegan, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee and President Roosevelt (labeled "Political Candidate") as soldiers in a foxhole. Hannegan holds a message, just received from a carrier pigeon, reading "Dewey Moving on Philadelphia, Plans Flank Attack in Kentucky, Blitzkrieg across Nation." He tells the political candidate, "You must tell the Commander in Chief immediately." The...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Who let him in? 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows President Roosevelt making a radio speech saying, "I have never sought and do not welcome Communist support." Listening to him are a group of Democratic leaders, standing in front of a sign reading "Meeting Tonight, Democratic Precinct Workers and looking on in dismay at Communist leader Earl Browder, who claps his hands and cries, "Hear! Hear!"...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    [Stork delivering Ball to F.D.R. and Miss Democracy with Hillman and Hannegan as children] 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows a happy family made up of President Roosevelt, Miss Democracy (a fussy old lady in corkscrew curls that Berryman frequently used to represent the Democratic Party), and two little boys, Sidney Hillman and Robert Hannegan, dancing around a stork that has just delivered a baby, Senator Joseph H. Ball. Hillman was head of the CIO Political...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    What is that, Henry? 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows President Roosevelt staring in the distance at Sidney Hillman, shaped like a boomerang, and asking Vice President Henry Wallace what it is. Wallace answers, "Looks like a boomerang. We better duck." Sidney Hillman was head of the CIO Political Action Committee, the most powerful political group supporting Roosevelt in his campaign for a fourth term as president. It was...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    You'll have to get in there and pitch 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Democratic National Committee Chairman Robert Hannegan as a baseball player in the Philadelphia baseball stadium, Shibe Park, telling President Roosevelt (shown as a baseball player sitting on the bench), "You'll have to get in there and PITCH." When there were reports in October, during the 1944 presidential election, that Republican candidate Thomas E. Dewey was gaining,...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Henry, you'd be surprised to know how many people are talking about you 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows President Roosevelt jovially greeting Vice President Henry Wallace who carries a briefcase covered with oriental characters. Roosevelt says, "Henry, you'd be surprised to know how many people are talking about you." As the 1944 Democratic nominating convention approached, Roosevelt played a devious hand, letting a number of people think that he supported their candidacies for Vice...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Striking while the iron is hot 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows a smiling President Roosevelt looking on as CIO President Philip Murray, shown as a blacksmith, hammers a piece of steel (labeled "Little Steel Formula") on an anvil with a hammer labeled "Labor Vote." The hearth is labeled "Practical Politics." Murray says, "This seems like a good time to reshape this gadget." The CIO and its Political...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    [President Roosevelt and Governor Thomas E. Dewey as children frightened by a Jack-o-lantern] 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows President Roosevelt and New York Governor Thomas E. Dewey as small boys frightened by a fierce Jack-o-lantern labeled "American Voter." The spooky atmosphere of this Halloween cartoon is heightened by a black cat, an owl, several bats, and a graveyard. The cartoon was drawn shortly before the 1944 presidential election when Roosevelt and Dewey were the Democratic and Republican...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Why don't you fellows come out into the open? 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows Ohio Governor John Bricker reproaching President Roosevelt and New York Governor Thomas E. Dewey for hiding in foxholes. Roosevelt's foxhole is labeled "Democratic Nomination; Dewey's "G.O.P. Nomination." Dewey, grinning, responds, "If you know a better 'ole, why don't you go to it?" In the 1944 presidential campaign, both Roosevelt and Dewey maintained almost up to the beginning of their...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    This ought to do the trick, Mr. President 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Secretary of State Cordell Hull, holding a document labeled "International Security Plan," telling President Roosevelt, "This ought to do the trick." Roosevelt, pointing to Senator John Bricker and Governor Thomas E. Dewey, who are manning a wall with guns labeled "Balanced Budget Demand" and "States' Rights," responds, "But what are we going to do about security...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Why General, you can't circulate a picture of the commander-in-chief among the soldiers. The law says that's political propaganda. 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson telling Army Air Forces chief Hap Arnold that he can't distribute the "Official Guide, Army Air Force" to the military because it contains a picture of President Roosevelt. In the background, Roosevelt is shown in a jeep in a tropical setting waving to ranks of soldiers. In August 1944, shortly...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Chester, I've been in some tight spots but I don't envy you now 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows Office of Price Administration head Chester Bowles at his desk being berated by an irate woman (labeled "The American Housewife") holding a ration book with "Cancelled" stamps in one hand and a rolling pin in the other. In the background, President Roosevelt chuckles, "Chester, I've been in some tight spots but I don't envy you now."...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Well, you asked for it by running in the usual partisan political sense 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows two President Roosevelts listening to a radio speech, full of invective, by Republican presidential candidate Thomas E. Dewey. An imperious Roosevelt, labeled "Commander in Chief," tells a disgruntled Roosevelt, labeled "Political Candidate," "Well, you asked for it by running in the usual partisan political sense." On September 23, 1944, Roosevelt gave the first speech of his...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1944-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    There's not going to be much left of the patient 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows "Taxpayer" John Q. Public lying on an operating table. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Robert L. Doughton, as a surgeon, has removed "50,000,000,00 in Federal, State and Local Taxes" which are being held in a bag by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Walter George. Meanwhile President Roosevelt, reading the patient's chart, says, "Keep at it, Gentlemen....
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1943-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    He who laughs last -- 1 drawing. | Two-panel cartoon. In the first panel President Roosevelt looks dismayed as Republican presidential candidate Thomas E. Dewey laughingly points to Communist Party chairman Earl Browder who holds a sign reading "Roosevelt for Fourth Term Is My Slogan! 1944." In the second, Roosevelt laughs at a worried Dewey while United Mine Workers leader John L. Lewis brandishes a sign reading, "Hurray for...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1943-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The first strike vote 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows working men lining up to vote outside the Allis-Chalmers Plant in Springfield, Illinois. A large sign reads, "The Question: Do you wish to permit an interruption of war production in wartime as a result of this dispute? Vote 'Yes' or 'No.'" Uncle Sam, who watches, says, "It's hard to believe that many of them will vote...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1943-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Personal service by the headwaiter himself 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows President Roosevelt as the headwaiter serving a large cup of coffee to an enthusiastic Uncle Sam, saying, "Plenty of sugar on the way, sir." Three dissatisfied waiters in the background: Office of Price Administration head Prentiss M. Brown, Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau and Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes complain. Brown says, "Look at...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1943-01-01
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Oh, the old gray mare, she ain't what she used to be 1 drawing. | World War II cartoon shows presidential adviser Harry Hopkins, Vice President Henry Wallace, and Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes, all riding a decrepit horse (labeled "New Deal") and singing the old popular song, "Oh, the old gray mare, she ain't what she used to be." President Roosevelt, watching from an automobile labeled "Win the War," calls out, "Turn her out...
    • Contributor: Berryman, Clifford Kennedy
    • Date: 1943-01-01