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    1836 to 1846 - Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Co... 1836 Makes an escape plan but is discovered, jailed, and then released. He returns to work for Hugh and Sophia Auld in Baltimore and is hired out to work as a caulker in a Baltimore shipyard. The knowledge he gains there helps him escape slavery two years later. A restored photograph of Anna Murray Douglass. Biographical File. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. ...
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    1847 to 1859 - Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Co... 1847 Returns from overseas tour; moves to Rochester, New York. With money raised by English and Irish friends, buys printing press and begins publishing the abolitionist weekly North Star. He continues publishing it until 1851. John Brown. Biographical File. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-2472 1848 Participant in first women's rights convention, Seneca Falls, New York. Meets and becomes acquaintance ...
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    1860 to 1876 - Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Co... 1860 March Daughter Annie dies in Rochester. April Returns to the United States and is not charged in the John Brown raid. November Abraham Lincoln is elected president. December South Carolina secedes from the Union. Abraham Lincoln, Washington, D.C., Nov. 8, 1863. Photographic print by Alexander Gardner. Presidential File, Meserve Collection No. 59. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-12950 1861 ...
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    1877 to 1895 - Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Co... 1877 Douglass is appointed U.S. marshal of the District of Columbia by President Hayes. Frederick Douglass House, (
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    Provenance and Publication History - Frederick Douglass Paper... In 1976, the Library of Congress published Frederick Douglass: A Register and Index of His Papers In the Library of Congress to assist researchers of the collection. This introduction to the Index gives a brief history of the Papers and how they came to the Library of Congress. It was originally written by Beverly Brannan, then of the Manuscript Division, and has been updated ...