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Collection International Tribunals Web Archive

About this Collection

The International Tribunals Web Archive contains selected websites on the most important international courts and tribunals created since World War II to adjudicate legal issues of a transnational nature. The collection preserves sites with information on the purpose, organization, and activities of international tribunals and will be useful to researchers, students, and practitioners of international law.

Prioritized for the collection are websites produced by the UN and UN-affiliated institutions, universities, and nongovernmental organizations, as well as specialized blogs by authorities on the subject. Among the featured resources is the International Criminal Court (ICC), established by the Rome Statute in 1998 as a permanent international criminal court with the mandate to prosecute the most serious crimes of concern to the international community, and the United Nations Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals, which was established by the UN Security Council in 2012 to continue a number of the functions of the ad hoc criminal tribunals of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda after the completion of their respective mandates. Also included in the collection is the University of Minnesota Human Rights Library and coverage of the ICC by Human Rights Watch and of the special tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda by Global Policy Forum.

The International Tribunals Web Archive supplements the print and electronic resources of the Law Library of Congress.

Collection Period: June 2014 to present (this is an ongoing archive).

Frequency of Collection: The majority of sites in the collection were targeted for capture monthly, with fewer sites targeted for capture weekly or quarterly.

Languages: Collection material in English, with French.

Acquisition Information: Sites have been added incrementally since the project began and will continue to be added as they are identified.

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