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Collection By Popular Demand: Jackie Robinson and Other Baseball Highlights, 1860s-1960s

Major League Teams and Games

This last game of the 1905 World Series featured two future Hall of Fame pitchers at the Polo Grounds in New York City. Christy Mathewson of the New York Giants faced Philadelphia Athletics Chief Bender and won by throwing his third shutout of the Series.

Deciding Game between Nationals and American Leagues B.B. Gelatin silver print, copyright by Pictorial News Co., 1905. ( Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Reproduction number: LC- USZ62-119636 DLC(b&w film copy neg.))

Mathewson (shown here in a later baseball card) won 373 games in his seventeen-year baseball career and had eighty regular season career shutouts. He was one of the five members in the first Hall of Fame Class in 1936.

Christy Mathewson, pitcher, New York, National League. Baseball card produced for Piedmont cigarettes (American Tobacco Co.), 1909-11. (Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Reproduction number: LC- USZC2-5119 (color))

Charles Albert Bender, known as Chief Bender, had 210 career victories, pitching in the American, National, and Federal Leagues.

Charles Albert Bender, of the Philadelphia Athletics baseball team. Photographic print by Bain News Service, ca. 1910. (Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Reproduction number: LC-USZ62-97857 (b&w))

This panoramic photograph shows the stadium later known as Wrigley Field, when it opened in 1914 as the home of the Federal League Chicago Whales. The Federal League began major league play in 1914 and folded after two years. In 1916, the stadium owner, Charles Weeghman, and others bought the National League Chicago Cubs, who still play at Wrigley Field.

Kansas City vs. Chicago, opening day, Chicago Federal League baseball park, Addison & Clark Sts., April 23, 1914, attendance 28,436. Gelatin silver print, copyright by Kaufmann, Weimer & Fabry Co., 1914. (Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Reproduction numbers: LC-USZ62- 114385 (b&w) (left section); LC-USZ62-114386 (b&w) (right section))

On July 4, 1914, the "Miracle" Braves were in last place in the National League, 15 games behind the league leading Giants. They went on to win 68 of 87 games to finish 10 1/2 games ahead of second place New York. Boston went on to sweep Connie Mack's favored Philadelphia Athletics in the World Series. This photograph is from game 3.

World's Series, Braves 5 - Athletics 4, 12 innings, Fenway Park, American League Grounds, Oct. 12, 1914. Gelatin silver print, photographed and copyright by John F. Riley, Boston, 1914. (Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Reproduction number: LC-USZ62-122692 DLC (b&w film copy neg.))

This 1920 Indians team would capture the American League pennant. Second from left is Ray Chapman, the only major leaguer to be killed by a pitched ball. He was hit by Yankees pitcher Carl Mays on August 16th, 1920, and died early the next morning. Also notable is Bill Wambsganss, third from right, who executed an unassisted triple play in the fifth game of the World Series that year.

The Cleveland baseball club, American League, season 1920. Gelatin silver print, copyright by F.A. Flowers Co., 1920. (Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Reproduction number: LC-USZCN6-6 DLC (color film copy neg.); LC-USZ62-123950 DLC (b&w film copy neg.) )

During the fifth game of the 1920 World Series, Cleveland Indians second baseman Bill Wambsganss caught a line drive hit by Brooklyn Dodger Clarence Mitchell. Wambsganss then stepped on second base before Pete Kilduff (who had run towards third base) could get back and tagged out Otto Miller as he neared second base. This is the only unassisted triple play in World Series history.

Wambsganss, and his tripple [sic] play victims, Kilduff, Mitchell & Miller of the Brooklyn B.B. Club. Photographic print, copyright by L. Van Oeyen, 1920. (Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Reproduction number: LC-USZ62-97623 (b&w))

The 1926 Yankees team included many men later elected to the Hall of Fame: Babe Ruth Babe Ruth thumbnail image (standing in center of back row), Earle Combs, Lou Gehrig, Waite Hoyt, Tony Lazzeri, Herb Pennock, and manager Miller Huggins. When this portrait was taken, they had just lost the World Series to the St. Louis Cardinals.

Detail of Babe Ruth from Yankees team photograph.
New York Yankees baseball team, posed. Photographic print by Bain News Service, Oct. 19, 1926 (Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Reproduction number: LC-USZ62-97851 (b&w))
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