Collection Items

  • Web Page
    How to View Maps - Maps of Liberia, 1830-1870 - Digital Collections Maps and other large images are presented as GIF or JPEG files and require no special viewers, unless you choose to download and view maps offline. For off-line viewing, you can download a possible four formats: GIF Format thumbnail JPEG format JPEG2000 format TIFF format You may require special software to view the downloaded JPEG2000 format. The following are some of the programs that ...
  • Web Page
    Rights & Access - Maps of Liberia, 1830-1870 - Digital Collections The maps in the Map Collections materials were either published prior to 1922, produced by the United States government, or both (see catalogue records that accompany each map for information regarding date of publication and source). The Library of Congress is providing access to these materials for educational and research purposes and is not aware of any U.S. copyright protection (see Title 17 of ...
  • Article
    1815 to 1817 - Maps of Liberia, 1830-1870 - Digital Collections After the struggle for liberty in the American Revolution, free and enslaved African Americans faced continued hardship and inequality. A number of white Americans, for a variety of reasons, joined them in their efforts to resolve this complex problem. One possible solution (advocated at a time when the assimilation of free blacks into American society seemed out of the question) was the complete separation ...
  • Article
    1820 to 1847 - Maps of Liberia, 1830-1870 - Digital Collections From Colony to Republic 1820 The American Colonization Society sent its first group of immigrants to Sherbro Island in Sierra Leone. The island's swampy, unhealthy conditions resulted in a high death rate among the settlers as well as the society's representatives. The British governor allowed the immigrants to relocate to a safer area temporarily while the ACS worked to save its colonization project from ...
  • Article
    1847 to 1871 - Maps of Liberia, 1830-1870 - Digital Collections Nationhood and Survival 1847 On July 26, The Liberian Declaration of Independence was adopted and signed. In it, Liberians charged their mother country, the United States, with injustices that made it necessary for them to leave and make new lives for themselves in Africa. They called upon the international community to recognize the independence and sovereignty of Liberia. Britain was one of the first ...
  • Article
    1900 to 1997 - Maps of Liberia, 1830-1870 - Digital Collections 1900-1997 One Nation, Many Peoples 1903 The British and Liberian governments came to an agreement about the borders between Sierra Leone and Liberia. 1904 The Liberian government instituted an administrative system that brought indigenous peoples into an indirect political relationship with the central government through their own paid officials. 1919 Liberia was one of the nations to sign the League of Nations covenant after ...
  • Article
    Selected Bibliography - Maps of Liberia, 1830-1870 - Digital Collections Selected Readings on Liberia Boley, G.E. Saigbe, Liberia: The Rise and Fall of the First Republic. New York: MacMillan Publishers, 1983 Cassell, C. Abayomi, Liberia: The History of the First African Republic. New York: Fountainhead Publishers', Inc, 1970. Dunn, Elwood D., and Hails, Svend E., Historical Dictionary of Liberia. African Historical Dictionaries Series. Metuchen: Scarecrow Press, 1985. Johnston, Harry, Liberia. London: Hutchinson, 1906. Liebenow, ...