Collection Items

  • Collection
    The Moldenhauer Archives - The Rosaleen Moldenhauer Memorial The Moldenhauer Archives at the Library of Congress contain approximately 3,500 items documenting the history of Western music from the medieval period through the modern era and is the richest composite gift of musical documents ever received by the Library. Before his death, Hans Moldenhauer (1906-1987) established a directive and provided funds for the Library of Congress to publish The Rosaleen Moldenhauer Memorial: Music...
    • Contributor: Moldenhauer, Hans
    • Date: 1000

    Collection Items: View 205 Items

  • Web Page
    Related Resources Items from the Moldenhauer Archives are held by the following institutions in addition to the Music Division of the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.:
  • Web Page
    Rights and Access The Moldenhauer Archives at the Library of Congress presents complete pieces of music or the total number of pages from individual pieces in the Library of Congress Moldenhauer Archives in those cases in which the Library has received permission to do so. There are instances where the Library has been granted limited permissions, displaying only images available from the published edition of the Archives...
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    A Guide to the Moldenhauer Archives This special presentation electronically replicates the book The Rosaleen Moldenhauer Memorial. Music History from Primary Sources: A Guide to the Moldenhauer Archives. In some cases, complete works discussed in the essays are available for viewing online.
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    Acknowledgments The Music Division has been blessed with donors, each of whom has shaped, through a personal vision, the course of our development. This volume is the first landmark in the work that Hans Moldenhauer envisioned when he bequeathed the greatest portion of his Archives to the Library of Congress. Dedicated to the memory of his wife Rosaleen, with whom he gathered the Moldenhauer Archives...
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    Arnold Schoenberg's Adagio for Strings and Harp This complete, single-movement, lovely little piece in A-flat, for an unusual combination of solo violin, small string ensemble and harp--twelve players in all-immediately brings to mind the slow movement of Brahms's F-Minor Piano Quintet (whose tempo indication, by the way, is Andante, un poco Adagio), though the resemblances are subtle rather than blatant. Perhaps the connection is implied through an initial melodic span of...
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    Two Sketches for Alban Berg's "Lulu" Both sketches for Lulu preserved in the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek contain material from Act I, scene 3, and originate from the same collection of autographs in the Austrian National Library.[1] Mus. ms. 17489 is a single leaf containing a draft of the ragtime music of Act I, scene 3, measures 10071021, and a rhythmic sketch of the opening of the ragtime music, measures 991993. Berg...
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    Excerpts from Gluck's Alceste, Copied and Revised by Hector Berlioz The survival of Gluck's operas owes much to the efforts of Hector Berlioz. The present manuscript is an important document of some of those efforts, the culmination of a lifetime of experience and thought, to preserve Alceste.
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    Wolfgang Amadè Mozart's Allegro and Andante ("Fantasy") in F Minor for Mechanical Organ, K. 6o8 Anyone visiting Europe's palaces, stately homes and museums is likely to notice the musical automata. These often exquisitely made creations range in size from costly toys that can be held in one hand to organs filling whole walls. But their most common manifestations are in the form of large tabletop clocks that contain small pipe organs, and the best of them are serious instruments,...
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    Anton Webern's Jone Poems On the evening of November 29, 1944, at the Archbishop's Palace in Vienna, there occurred a poetry reading devoted to the works of Hildegard Jone. The evening was sponsored by Dr. Otto Mauer, a priest, professor, and patron of modern art who was also a personal friend of Jone's. The poetry reading was one of many such events that Mauer organized during the latter...
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    Anton Webern's "Mein Weg geht jetzt vorüber," op. 15, No.4 During the years from 1915 ti 1925, Webern was preoccupied almost exclusively with the composition of Lieder. Totalling over forty settings (complete and fragmentary) of Latin liturgical texts, pious folk texts and poems by George Trakl, these songs chronicle his continued experimentation with atonal writing and gradual adoption of the twelve-tone method. "Mein Weg geht jetzt vurüber," composed in 1922 and published as No....
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    Anton Webern's Six Pieces for Orchestra, op. 6, Arrangement for Chamber Ensemble Arnold Schoenberg first disclosed his plan for a private society devoted to the performance of contemporary music on June 30, 1918, at a meeting with friends and students in his Mödling home. The project, whose immediate incentive had been a series of public rehearsals of Schoenberg's Chamber Symphony op. 9 (in June 1918), took shape very rapidly; it led to the foundation of the...
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    Anton Webern's Zwei Lieder für gemischten Chor, op. 19 Anton Webern's Zwei Lieder für gemischten Chor, op. 19 (1925-1926) remains one of his least-known compositions, yet it occupies an extremely important position in his oeuvre. Not only is this Webern's first twelve-tone work on a comparatively large scale, it also marks the first time he organized constituent movements around the same row. His previous experiments with twelve-tone composition had treated the row rather...
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    Two Leaves of Sketches for Arnold Schoenberg's Concerto for String Quartet and Orchestra The four pages of sketch material pertaining to movements III and IV of this Concerto aptly fill in those gaps in the otherwise mostly uninterrupted sequence of sketches cited and discussed in the complete edition of Schoenberg's works.[1] Although it is to be noted that these gaps were never editorially acknowledged, their existence would have been impossible to ignore by anyone seriously studying this...
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    A Beethoven Sketch for the Puzzle Canon "Das Schweigen," WoO 168 In his essay on "Beethoven's Sketches for Sehnsucht (WoO 146)," Lewis Lockwood cites Gustav Nottebohm's pioneering essays on the subject of Beethoven's sketchbooks as primary sources for what he calls the prevailing view of the composer's creative approach to composition. Defined as a process of assiduous labor by which initial musical ideas were transformed by gradual stages into artistic substance, this view is admonished...
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    A Sketch Leaf from Ludwig van Beethoven's Piano Sonata, Op.28 One of the more poignant assertions made on the subject of the history of Beethoven's sketchbooks is that the day of his death marked the beginning of the history of their destruction.[1] This statement is particularly apropos with regard to a single-leaf manuscript from the Moldenhauer Archives, which contains music from the second movement of the Piano Sonata, op. 28, and which is one...
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    Béla Bartók's Working Method in Dealing with Proofs for His Violin Concerto (1937-1938) Bartók himself once said to the writer of these lines that his artistic development might be likened to a spiral: to deal with the same problems on an ever rising level, with correspondingly rising success--this seemed to him the guiding principle of his development.[1]
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    The Coronation Scene from Modest Musorgsky's Boris Godunov in Rimsky-Korsakov's Edition The group of Russian composers who began to assemble after 1857, consisting of Mily Balakirev, César Cui, Modest Musorgsky, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, and Alexander Borodin, came to be known as the moguchaia kuchka (literally, "the mighty little heap," traditionally rendered in English as "the Mighty Handful," or simply "The Five"), after this term first appeared in the Russian press in 1867 to describe this loose...
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    Two Brahms Letters [To Dr. Max Abraham at C.F. Peters, Leipzig] [Wien, 3. Oktober 1881]
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    Some Autobiographical Overtones in Brahms's "Rinaldo" Since its earliest performances Brahms's Rinaldo has met with challenge. The premiere (Vienna, February 28, 1869), at which Brahms conducted the Akademische Gesangverein and the Hofoper orchestra, was greeted by largely negative reviews.[1] With the exception of Theodor Billroth's qualified praise, commentary ranged from tepid to hostile, with critics emphasizing Rinaldo's "endless shades of gray," "excessive Baroque conceits," and lack of sensuality.[2] Somewhat more...
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    Two Letters by Anton Bruckner The two letters published here for the first time were written during a crucial period in the life of Anton Bruckner (1824-1896): the midlife years in which he fought for recognition of his music, especially his symphonies, by the musical world at large. In fact, the letters may be considered representative of two different stages in the reception of Bruckner's work: neglect and misunderstanding,...
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    Pablo Casals: A Letter Written from Exile There is a remarkable poignancy to this document written by Pablo Casals on May 6, 1940. Penned in the village of Prades, France, only a few miles from the Spanish border, it breathes the anguish of exile, the pain of shattered dreams, and a prophetic foreboding about the future.
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    A Chopin Manuscript: Prelude in A-flat Major, op. posth. Chopin's Prelude in A-flat Major, without opus number, was first published in Geneva in the August 1918 issue of the art journal Pages d'Art. Untitled by Chopin, the forty-one-measure piece appeared under the title Prélude inédit. The work was first performed in public on April 9, 1919, by E. R. Blanchet and was subsequently reissued in an edition by the music publisher Henn. French...
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    Contributors FERENC BÓNIS, who resides in Budapest, is a musicologist and an eminent expert on Béla Bartók. He is also President of the Hungarian Kodály Society.