Collection Items

  • Notated Music
    A life in the west Sheet music | 1 score | by Henry Russell. (Statement Of Responsibility). In bound volumes: Copyright Deposits 1820-1860 Also available through the Library of Congress Web Site as facsimile page images. Sheet Music (Form). Sheet Music (Form).
    • Contributor: W. C. Peters - Russell, Henry - Morris, G. P.
    • Date: 1844

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  • Notated Music
    Wake up Jake
    Music for a nation: American sheet music, 1820-1860
    Sheet music | 1 score | by Geo. Holman. (Statement Of Responsibility). In bound volumes: Copyright Deposits 1820-1860 Also available through the Library of Congress Web Site as facsimile page images. Sheet Music (Form). Sheet Music (Form).
    • Contributor: W. C. Peters - Holman, Geo
    • Date: 1848

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  • Web Page
    Digitizing the Collection - Home Sweet Home: Life in Nineteenth-Century Ohio - Digital Collections This Web presentation is based on the sound recording Where Home Is: Life in Nineteenth-Century Cincinnati, released in 1977 by New World Records (www.newworldrecords.org External). Recordings were augmented by adding digitized sheet music and illustrative images. In addition, the original liner notes for the recording, by Kathryn Kish Sklar and Jon Newsom, were adapted and augmented to introduce each section of this presentation. Paper...
  • Web Page
    Related Resources - Home Sweet Home: Life in Nineteenth-Century Ohio - Digital Collections Library of Congress Related Materials and Collections Essay: Life in 19th Century Cincinnati by Kathryn Kish Sklar, for more information on how the music in this collection reflects Cincinnati’s history. Essay: Understanding the Music by Jon Newsom, for more information about the musical selections in this presentation. Digital Collection: The African-American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920 (Selections from the Ohio Historical Society) for a more...
  • Web Page
    Rights and Access - Home Sweet Home: Life in Nineteenth-Century Ohio - Digital Collections Home Sweet Home: Life in Nineteenth-Century Ohio is made available on this Web site with permission from New World Records, Recorded Anthology of American Music, Inc., 16 Penn Plaza #835, New York, NY 10001-1820, www.newworldrecords.org External. The Library of Congress provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes. The written...
  • Article
    Family Life - Home Sweet Home: Life in Nineteenth-Century Ohio - Digital Collections Just moved. Original by H. Mosler; chromo-lithographed & published by A. & C. Kaufmann, 1870. Family life in nineteenth-century Cincinnati was fundamentally different from traditional family life in the eighteenth century. Eighteenth-century families assumed a natural hierarchy and continuity between generations. A typical family would depend on the labor of sons and daughters to contribute sufficiently to the family's economy to provide a beginning...
    • Date: 1800
  • Article
    Minstrel Songs - Home Sweet Home: Life in Nineteenth-Century Ohio - Digital Collections Primrose & West's Big Minstrels. Strobridge Lith. Co., c1896. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Blackface minstrelsy, which derived its name from the white performers who blackened their faces with burnt cork, was a form of entertainment that reached its peak in the mid-nineteenth century. Using caricatures of African Americans in song, dance, tall tales, and stand-up comedy, minstrelsy was immensely popular with...
    • Date: 1800
  • Article
    Parlor Music - Home Sweet Home: Life in Nineteenth-Century Ohio - Digital Collections [Power of music]. James Queen, artist, c1872. Print and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Throughout the nineteenth century, Americans took great delight in making music together by performing in instrumental and vocal ensembles, and by attending musical soirees, sing-alongs, and other interactive musical events. Families entertained themselves in the home by making music together. In Ohio, as elsewhere, parlor music -- that genre of...
    • Date: 1800
  • Article
    Religion - Home Sweet Home: Life in Nineteenth-Century Ohio - Digital Collections Watch meeting. Color chromolithograph. J. Latham & Company, c1878. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Changes in religious life paralleled the changes in family life. Between 1776 and 1820 American religion changed from a hierarchically-run to a participant-run activity with revivals and competition among denominations. The Puritans' inscrutable, angry God was replaced by a loving, comforting Jesus. The sacred songs of the time...
    • Date: 1800
  • Article
    Rural Values - Home Sweet Home: Life in Nineteenth-Century Ohio - Digital Collections Farmers nooning, from the original picture in the possession of Iona Sturges Esqr. Painted by W.S. Mount ; engraved by Alfred Jones ; printed by J. Dalton. 1843. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Songs sung in mid-nineteenth-century parlors often endorsed agrarian values and promoted emigration to the West. Indeed, before the Civil War, both North and South had been predominantly rural. The...
    • Date: 1800
  • Article
    Singing Schools - Home Sweet Home: Life in Nineteenth-Century Ohio - Digital Collections Cecil giving Felix the music lesson. Pen and ink drawing by Alice Barber Stephens [1888?]. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. The singing school was a common fixture in many American communities during the nineteenth century. In the singing school, rudimentary musical sight reading and the mechanics of singing were taught by a 'singing master.' These schools often became popular places for communities...
    • Date: 1800
  • Article
    Temperance - Home Sweet Home: Life in Nineteenth-Century Ohio - Digital Collections The fruits of temperance. Currier & Ives, 1848. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Temperance songs appeared regularly in all types of nineteenth-century popular songbooks. Supporters of the temperance movement believed poor health, poverty, crime and general moral degradation were the direct results of alcohol consumption. Temperance songs, poems and hymns often painted sensational and even dire scenarios of negligent, alcoholic fathers causing...
    • Date: 1800