Collection Items

  • Book/Printed Material
    Memoirs : historical and edifying, of a missionary apostolic of the order of Saint Dominic among various Indian tribes and among the Catholics and Protestants in the United States of America. Born and educated in Milan, Italy, Samuel Mazzuchelli (1806-1864) began his American ministry in 1828 at Mackinac Island, a center of the fur trade. Building churches, organizing schools, and preaching in both French and English, he traveled the Mississippi and the Great Lakes over long distances and in all seasons. After 1839, he continued much of his work in Iowa as a vicar-general to...
    • Contributor: Mazzuchelli, Samuel - Kennedy, Mary Benedicta - Ireland, John
    • Date: 1915

    Resource:
    View 398 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Reminiscences, memoirs, and lectures of Monsignor A. Ravoux, V.G. Monsignor Augustin Ravoux (1815-1906) emigrated from France in 1838, responding to the plea of the Roman Catholic Bishop of Dubuque, Iowa, for missionaries among the Indians. His first mission was at Prairie du Chien, where he remained until he began ministering to the Sioux [Dakota] Indians in 1841. During his time with the Sioux, 1841-1844, he became proficient in their language and developed a...
    • Contributor: Ravoux, A. (Augustin)
    • Date: 1890

    Resource:
    View 236 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Autobiography of Erastus O. Haven, D.D., LL.D., one of the bishops of the Methodist Episcopal church. Erastus O. Haven (1820-1881) was a minister and leader of the Methodist Episcopal Church during a vigorous period of its growth and development. The child of a Methodist minister and farmer, he was born in Boston and spent most of his childhood in Massachusetts. Upon graduating from Wesleyan University, Haven established a life-long pattern of combining the ministry with teaching. This eventually led him...
    • Contributor: Haven, E. O. (Erastus Otis) - Stratton, C. C. (Charles Carroll)
    • Date: 1883

    Resource:
    View 334 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Nobody owns us; the story of Joe Gilbert, midwestern rebel. This laudatory biography of Joseph Gilbert, an outspoken British-American leader of the cooperative movement in the Midwest, is based on interviews, newspapers and magazine articles, and transcripts of court proceedings during Gilbert's trials for sedition during the years immediately following World War I. Born in London in 1865, Gilbert was raised in Wolverley, Worcestershire by a conservative, working-class aunt and uncle. Seeking education and...
    • Contributor: Douthit, Davis
    • Date: 1948

    Resource:
    View 254 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Recollections of an immigrant. This book recounts the immigration experience of a prominent Minneapolis lawyer who served as a local elected official (Judge of Probate) and led an active civic life. Ueland was originally a Norwegian from the Stavanger region. Son of a farmer and politician, he recalls many of the folk customs of his native village community. He left for America in 1871 in late adolescence and...
    • Contributor: Ueland, Andreas
    • Date: 1929

    Resource:
    View 277 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Narrative of Sojourner Truth; a bondswoman of olden time, emancipated by the New York Legislature in the early part of the present century; with a history of her labors and correspondence drawn ...
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    Sojourner Truth (1795-1883) was originally a Dutch-speaking slave in Hurley, New York (Ulster County) who became one of the nineteenth century's most eloquent voices for the causes of anti-slavery and women's rights. This work includes several important texts about her life, beginning with a dictated autobiography. In it, she tells of her early life in slavery and how she did not officially achieve freedom...
    • Contributor: Gilbert, Olive - Titus, Frances W.
    • Date: 1878

    Resource:
    View 320 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Thirty years a slave. From bondage to freedom. The institution of slavery as seen on the plantation and in the home of the planter. Louis Hughes was born in Virginia (1832), but was sold (1844) in the Richmond slave market to a cotton planter and his wife who lived on the Mississippi River. Later, he traveled with them to their new home in Memphis, Tennessee, and spent time during the Civil War in Alabama. Hughes made five attempts to escape, alone and with his wife and friends, but...
    • Contributor: Hughes, Louis
    • Date: 1897

    Resource:
    View 226 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Half a century. At the beginning of her autobiography, Jane Swisshelm announces that she intends to show the relationship of faith to the antislavery struggle, to record incidents characteristic of slavery, to provide an inside look at hospitals during the Civil War, to look at the conditions giving rise to the nineteenth-century struggle for women's rights, and to demonstrate, through her own life, the "mutability of human...
    • Contributor: Swisshelm, Jane Grey Cannon
    • Date: 1880

    Resource:
    View 363 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    A woman's life-work: labors and experiences of Laura S. Haviland. Canadian-born Laura Haviland (1808-1898) was an evangelically-minded Quaker and later (for a time) a Wesleyan Methodist, active in education and social justice issues throughout her life. A Woman's Life Work is, above all, a religious autobiography chronicling her conversion experience and her desire to express faith through benevolent social action. She was brought up in New York State but moved to Raisin, Lenawee County,...
    • Contributor: Haviland, Laura S. (Laura Smith)
    • Date: 1882

    Resource:
    View 531 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    La Follette's autobiography; a personal narrative of political experiences, The autobiography of Robert La Follette (1855-1925) traces the political life and accomplishments of this eminent Republican politician from his election as district attorney for Dane County, Wisconsin in 1880 to the presidential campaign of 1912, when his bid to dislodge President William Howard Taft was pushed aside by former president Theodore Roosevelt on the Progressive Party's national ticket. The book emphasizes tactics, strategies,...
    • Contributor: La Follette, Robert M. (Robert Marion)
    • Date: 1913

    Resource:
    View 856 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Recollections of a long life, 1829-1915, Born in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Isaac Stephenson (1829-1918) followed his interests as a lumberman, sailor, and entrepreneur to Bangor, Maine and, later, to the northern woods of Wisconsin. In 1858, he purchased a one-quarter interest in the North Ludington Lumber Company in Marinette and went on to become that community's leading citizen. He founded the Stephenson National Bank, donated the Stephenson Public Library, developed...
    • Contributor: Stephenson, Isaac
    • Date: 1915

    Resource:
    View 277 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Personal memoirs of a residence of thirty years with the Indian tribes on the American frontiers: with brief notices of passing events, facts, and opinions, A.D. 1812 to A.D. 1842. This is the autobiographical account of an explorer, government administrator, and scholar whose researches into the language and customs of the Chippewa and other Native American peoples of the Great Lakes region are considered milestones in nineteenth-century ethnography. After a childhood in Hamilton, New York, Schoolcraft gained attention for the reports and journals he wrote on trips west to explore mineral deposits in Arkansas,...
    • Contributor: Schoolcraft, Henry Rowe
    • Date: 1851

    Resource:
    View 758 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Captured by the Indians: reminiscences of pioneer life in Minnesota. This book is an account of Minnie Buce Carrigan's captivity among the Sioux after the 1862 uprising and her subsequent experience as an orphan. Carrigan emigrated with her German parents to Fox Lake, Wisconsin in 1858. Two years later they helped to establish a German settlement at Middle Creek in Renville County, Minnesota, where they lived in relative comfort and peace among the Sioux...
    • Contributor: Carrigan, Minnie Buce
    • Date: 1912

    Resource:
    View 68 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Memoir of William W. Warren Also available in digital form on the Library of Congress Web site, and on microfilm.
    • Contributor: Williams, J. Fletcher (John Fletcher) - Minnesota Historical Society
    • Date: 1885

    Resource:
    View 13 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    History of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan: a grammar of their language, and personal and family history of the author. Blackbird (Mack-e-te-be-nessy) was an Ottawa chief's son who served as an official interpreter for the U.S. government and later as a postmaster while remaining active in Native American affairs as a teacher, advisor on diplomatic issues, lecturer and temperance advocate. In this work he describes how he became knowledgeable about both Native American and white cultural traditions and chronicles his struggles to achieve two...
    • Contributor: Blackbird, Andrew J.
    • Date: 1887

    Resource:
    View 129 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    A tour from the city of New-York, to Detroit, in the Michigan territory, made between the 2d of May and the 22d of September, 1818 ... The tour is accompanied with a ... In a series of letters, William Darby (1775-1854), who describes himself as a member of the New-York Historical Society, chronicles his journey up the Hudson, across New York to Ogdensburg and Sackett's Harbor (on Lake Ontario), and on to Buffalo and Detroit. Along the way, he spends time in Rhinebeck, Utica, Geneva, Niagara Falls, and other points of scenic or economic interest. He also...
    • Contributor: Darby, William
    • Date: 1819

    Resource:
    View 304 Pages

  • Collection
    Pioneering the Upper Midwest: Books from Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, ca. 1820-1910 Portrays the states of Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century through first-person accounts, biographies, promotional literature, local histories, ethnographic and antiquarian texts, colonial archival documents, and other works drawn from the Library of Congress's General Collections and Rare Books and Special Collections Division. The collection's 138 volumes depict the land and its resources; the conflicts between settlers and...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Rare Book and Special Collections Division - Library of Congress. National Digital Library Program
    • Date: 1998

    View 340 Items

  • Book/Printed Material
    A canoe voyage up the Minnay Sotor; with an account of the lead and copper deposits in Wisconsin; of the gold region in the Cherokee country; and sketches of popular manners; &c. ... This detailed travelogue, the concluding part of a two-volume work written primarily for a British readership, discusses the United States' geological resources and offers critical observations about the manners and customs of its different peoples. It was written over a decade after the author explored St. Peter's River--the "Minnay Sotor" of the book's title--in 1835, and draws upon the journals he kept along the...
    • Contributor: Featherstonhaugh, George William
    • Date: 1847

    Resources:
    View 434 Pages View 361 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Mostly Mississippi, Harold Speakman (1888-1928), a writer and visual artist, journeyed the Mississippi from its Minnesota headwaters to New Orleans by canoe and on a twenty-foot house boat in the company of his wife, Frances "Russell" Lindsay Speakman. The Speakmans made the 2,450-mile trip shortly after their marriage in July 5, 1925. The result was this work, Speakman's only full-scale American travel narrative, though he had...
    • Contributor: Speakman, Harold - Speakman, Frances Lindsay
    • Date: 1927

    Resource:
    View 408 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Wau-bun, the early day in the Northwest. This book recounts the experiences of a young, genteel wife adjusting to the military life and frontier conditions of life at Fort Winnebago, Wisconsin, in the early 1830s. She describes her perilous journeys back and forth to the early settlement of Chicago, her complex cultural encounters with a diverse frontier society, and her determination to instill her own standards of civilized behavior and Christian...
    • Contributor: Kinzie, John H.
    • Date: 1873

    Resource:
    View 398 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    A summer in the wilderness; embracing a canoe voyage up the Mississippi and around Lake Superior. Charles Lanman (1819-1895) was a Michigan-born landscape painter, sportsman, and writer who studied under Asher Durand and published several books about his journeys through the wilderness and newly developing areas of the northern Midwest and Canada. This book shares highlights of his 1846 trip by steamship and canoe north from St. Louis to Rock Island, Nauvoo, Prairie du Chien and onward to Lake Pepin...
    • Contributor: Lanman, Charles
    • Date: 1847

    Resource:
    View 204 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Narrative journal of travels through the northwestern regions of the United States : extending from Detroit through the great chain of American lakes to the sources of the Mississippi River, performed as ...
    Narrative journal of travels from Detroit northwest through the great chain of American lakes to the sources of the Mississippi River in the year 1820
    Henry Rowe Schoolcraft (1793-1864) was an explorer, Indian agent, and early ethnologist of Native American culture who joined an expedition organized by Governor Cass of Michigan in 1819. Its purpose was to locate the Mississippi River's sources, to explore the Great Lakes region, and to describe its significant topographical features, natural history, and mineral wealth. Schoolcraft joined the expedition as a mineralogist, and this...
    • Contributor: Schoolcraft, Henry Rowe - Joseph Meredith Toner Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1821

    Resource:
    View 432 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Summer on the lakes, in 1843.
    Summer on the lakes
    Sarah Margaret Fuller Ossoli (1810-1850), better known as Margaret Fuller, was a writer, editor, translator, early feminist thinker, critic, and social reformer who was associated with the Transcendentalist movement in New England. This is her introspective account of a trip to the Great Lakes region in 1843. Organized as a series of travel episodes interspersed with literary and social commentary, the work displays a...
    • Contributor: Fuller, Margaret
    • Date: 1844

    Resource:
    View 274 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Collections and researches made by the Pioneer Society of the State of Michigan.
    Michigan pioneer collections
    This volume is a collection of several different kinds of important historical documents published by the Michigan Pioneer and Historical Society. Volume 10 combines approximately two hundred pages of articles written about local, territorial, and state history with a second installment of materials from the Haldimand Papers, continued from Volume 9. The Haldimand Papers are materials culled from Canadian archives in Ottawa by the...
    • Contributor: Bartholomew, Henry S. K. (Henry Sager Knapp) - Pioneer Society of the State of Michigan
    • Date: 1908

    Resource:
    View 716 Pages

  • Book/Printed Material
    Historical collections made by the Pioneer Society of the State of Michigan. including reports of officers and papers read at the annual meeting of 1887..
    Michigan pioneer collections
    This volume is a collection of several different kinds of important historical documents published by the Michigan Pioneer and Historical Society. This volume opens with the President of the Society's address along with reports, memorials, personal reminiscences, and local history papers delivered at the 1887 annual meeting. Some of these papers deal with the Ordinance of 1787, early exploration of Lake Superior and life...
    • Contributor: Bartholomew, Henry S. K. (Henry Sager Knapp) - Pioneer Society of the State of Michigan
    • Date: 1908

    Resource:
    View 696 Pages