Collection Items

  • Film, Video
    Blind Boys of Alabama I "Amazing Grace" The Blind Boys of Alabama perform "Amazing Grace" at the Library of Congress, June 5, 2002. Forms part of the The Blind Boys of Alabama Concert Collection. videorecording | videorecording ; 4 min | Homegrown Concert Series. (Source). June 5, 2002. (Date). Forms part of the The Blind Boys of Alabama Concert Collection. (Source Note). Videorecording (Form).
    • Contributor: Library of Congress - Blind Boys of Alabama - Fountain, Clarence - Carter, Jimmy Lee
    • Date: 2002
  • Film, Video
    Blind Boys of Alabama II "Keep the Devil in the Hole" Blind Boys of Alabama perform "Keep the Devil in the Hole" at the Library of Congress, June 5, 2002. Forms part of the The Blind Boys of Alabama Concert Collection. videorecording | videorecording ; 4 min | Homegrown Concert Series (Source). Forms part of The Blind Boys of Alabama Concert Collection. (Source Note). June 5, 2002. (Date). Videorecording (Form).
    • Contributor: Library of Congress - Blind Boys of Alabama - Fountain, Clarence - Carter, Jimmy Lee
    • Date: 2002
  • Collection
    The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America See and Hear American History Through Song "Know the songs of a country and you will know its history for the true feeling of a people speaks through what they sing." – Preface to The Songs of Henry Clay Work (1884) Listen to the changes in the "Star Spangled Banner" as played by different bands in different eras. Look at the ways in which ...
    • Date: 1581

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  • Article
    Historical Topics - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections The history of America is reflected through its songs. Read more about how immigration and migration; work and industry; social change; war and conflict; politics and political campaigns; and sports and leisure in the United States have been portrayed in song. Listen to examples for all.
  • Article
    Interactive Maps - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections See the connection between America's geography and song through interactive maps that offer songs from the states and about the states.
  • Audio Recording
    Armed forces medley sound recording | 1 DAT audiotape | The army goes rolling along--Anchors aweigh--Marines Hymn--Semper paratus--Off we go into the wild blue yonder. (Content). Taken from a recording of a concert held at the Library of Congress in 2002. "The U.S. Air Force" Words & Music by Robert Crawford Copyright © 1939, 1942, 1951 by Carl Fischer, Inc. Copyrights renewed. All Rights assigned to Carl ...
    • Contributor: Schissel, Loras J. - Virginia Grand Military Band
    • Date: 2002
  • Audio Recording
    Eternal Father, strong to save sound recording | 1 DAT audiotape | Taken from a recording of a concert held at the Library of Congress in 2002. Recording of "Eternal Father, Strong to Save" from the Loras John Schissel collection. (Copyright Notice). Sound Recording (Form).
    • Contributor: Dykes, John - Schissel, Loras J. - Whiting, William - Virginia Grand Military Band
    • Date: 2002
  • Audio Recording
    God bless America sound recording | 1 DAT audiotape | Taken from a recording of a concert held at the Library of Congress. "God Bless America" by Irving Berlin (c) Copyright 1938, 1939 by Irving Berlin (c) Copyright Renewed 1965, 1966 by Irving Berlin (c) Copyright Assigned the Trustees of the God Bless America Fund International Copyright Secured. All Rights Reserved. Reprinted by Permission. Recording of "God ...
    • Contributor: Berlin, Irving - Schissel, Loras J. - Virginia Grand Military Band
    • Date: 2002
  • Audio Recording
    Stars and stripes forever sound recording | 1 DAT audiotape | Taken from recording of concert held at the Library of Congress in 2002. Recording of "Stars and Stripes Forever" from the Loras John Schissel Collection. (Copyright Notice). Sound Recording (Form).
    • Contributor: Sousa, John Philip - Virginia Grand Military Band
    • Date: 2002
  • Audio Recording
    Guadalcanal march [from Victory at sea] sound recording | Recorded at a concert held at the Library of Congress in 2002. "The Guadalcanal March" by Richard Rodgers Copyright (c) 1952 by Williamson Music Copyright Renewed. International Copyright Secured. All Rights Reserved. Reprinted by Permission. (Copyright Notice). 30 second (Extent). Due to copyright restrictions, only excerpts from this item are available. (Standard Restriction). Sound Recording (Form).
    • Contributor: Rogers, Richard - Virginia Grand Concert Band
    • Date: 2002
  • Article
    America the Beautiful Article. "America the Beautiful" has been called "an expression of patriotism at its finest." It conveys an attitude of appreciation and gratitude for the nation's extraordinary physical beauty and abundance, without triumphalism. It has also been incorporated into a number of films including The Sandlot and The Pentagon Wars. Its lyricist, Katharine Lee Bates, died March 28, 1929, and is buried in Falmouth, Massachusetts, ...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress
    • Date: 2002
  • Article
    Anchors Aweigh Article. Charles Zimmermann died just before the U.S. entered WWI but his counterpart, John Philip Sousa, enlisted in the U.S. Naval Reserve and was paid one dollar per month to organize the young musicians recruited into the service. He molded the Great Lakes Navy Band into an accomplished musical organization and became the first Navy musician to hold the rank of Lieutenant Commander. Midshipman ...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress
    • Date: 2002
  • Article
    Battle hymn of the republic Article. But it was when Julia Ward Howe visited Washington, DC in 1861 that the tune properly came to be called "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." Howe and her husband, both of whom were active abolitionists, experienced first-hand a skirmish between Confederate and Union troops in nearby Virginia, and heard the troops go into battle singing "John Brown's Body." That evening, November 18, ...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress
    • Date: 2002
  • Article
    Columbia the Gem of the Ocean Article. Sheet music from both 1843 and 1846 credited the American title as "Columbia, the Land of the Brave." Yet between these two dates, in 1844, the song was also published under the title it subsequently retained, "Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean." Extremely popular during Abraham Lincoln's Civil War administration, the song became a standard tune in the U.S. Marine Corps Band's repertoire.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress
    • Date: 2002
  • Article
    Eternal Father, Strong to Save Article. Eternal Father, was a favorite hymn of both President Theodore Roosevelt, a former Secretary of the Navy (1897-98), and President Franklin D. Roosevelt, a former Assistant Secretary of the Navy. It was performed as the body of President John F. Kennedy, a PT boat commander in World War II, was brought to lie in state at the U.S. Capitol.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress
    • Date: 2002
  • Article
    Fanfare for the Common Man Article. In March 1943, income taxes were a major issue for the common man. The United States had been at war about fifteen months and government spending soared. The previous year, as other taxes rose, only one in seven taxpayers had managed to save enough from their wages to pay the federal government. Congress had just recently required employers to withhold an employee's estimated ...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress
    • Date: 2002
  • Article
    God Bless America Article. Irving Berlin lived a long life, one hundred and one years, and built a catalog of over 1,000 songs. His first published song was "Marie from Sunny Italy" (1907) and his first major hit was "Alexander's Ragtime Band" (1911). He also wrote for Broadway and the movies. Among his most recognized songs are "A Pretty Girl Is Like a Melody," "Mandy," "White Christmas," ...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress
    • Date: 2002
  • Article
    Hail Columbia Article. Up until the 1890s "Hail Columbia" was played as the de facto national anthem of the United States. President Lincoln once mentioned he had to stand up and take off his hat when "Hail Columbia" was sung. Many Europeans actually took it to be the U.S. anthem and played it accordingly. In 1889 it was played in that fashion to honor Thomas Edison ...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress
    • Date: 2002
  • Article
    Hail to the Chief Article. -- "The Lady of the Lake" by Sir Walter Scott
    • Contributor: Library of Congress
    • Date: 2002
  • Article
    I'll Be Home for Christmas Article. In December 1965, having completed the first U.S. space rendezvous and set a record for the longest flight in the U.S. space program, the astronauts Frank Borman and James Lovell hurtled back to earth aboard their Gemini 7 spacecraft. Asked by NASA communication personnel if they wanted any particular music piped up to them, the crew requested Bing Crosby's recording of "I'll Be ...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress
    • Date: 2002
  • Article
    Marines' Hymn Article. The first version of the song was copyrighted, published and distributed in 1919 by The Leatherneck - a Marine Corps magazine printed in Quantico, Virginia. On November 21, 1942, the Commandant of the United States Marine Corps approved a slight change in the words of the first verse, to read "In air, on land, and sea" instead of the earlier "In the air, ...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress
    • Date: 2002
  • Article
    My Country 'Tis of Thee Article. Smith initially wrote another verse, which he cut because it seemed too strident and not in keeping with what he wanted to be a peaceful homage to the nation. Beethoven and Haydn have incorporated the music of this song into their own work and, on August 28, 1963, Rev. Martin Luther King quoted Smith's lyrics when he stated from the steps of the ...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress
    • Date: 2002
  • Article
    Of Thee I Sing Article. View posters from the New Deal era in American Memory
    • Contributor: Library of Congress
    • Date: 2002
  • Article
    U.S. Air Force Song Article. Melodies and songs are often quoted within another piece of music and "Off We Go" is no exception. Frank Zappa's twenty-five-minute opus "Billy the Mountain," a pastiche of American musical genres, incorporates melodic references to "Off We Go" and a number of other tunes such as "Over the Rainbow," "Pomp and Circumstance," and television's the Tonight Show theme.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress
    • Date: 2002