Collection Items

  • Article
    Puerto Rican Song Puerto Rico is an unincorporated territory of the United States, located in the northeastern Caribbean. Puerto Rico was a Spanish colony between 1493, when it was claimed for Spain by Christopher Columbus, and 1898, when Spain ceded Puerto Rico to the United States in the wake of the Spanish-American War.
  • Notated Music
    There'll be a hot time in the old town to-night Notated Music. print | 1 score (3 pages) ; 35 cm | by Theo. A. Metz. (Statement Of Responsibility). For voice and piano. "Words by Joe Hayden; new version by T.A. Metz, J.A. Dillon & Gilbert Dodge"--Caption. Also available in digital form on the Library of Congress Web site. (Additional Physical Form). Staff notation. (Language). Print (Form). Unmediated (Form). Volume (Form).
    • Contributor: Metz Music Co. - Metz, Theodore A. - Hayden, Joe
    • Date: 1917

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  • Article
    Spanish American Song Spain was the first European power to establish an empire in the New World. This had an impact on the regions that later became part of the United States, as Spain established colonies and laid claim to much of the land west of the Mississippi River, along with Florida and Puerto Rico. Spanish settlement of North America began in the sixteenth century and immigration...
  • Article
    War and Conflict - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections War has played no small part in the history of American song. Some of the nation's oldest folk and pop songs celebrate important victories, the experiences of soldiers and sailors, or the loss of loved ones. Playlist for War and Conflict Five recordings from Library of Congress collections describe the business of conflict in a human way. The Waltz must change to a march,...
  • Article
    Basque American Song Basque sheepherder. Dangberg Ranch, Douglas County, Nevada. Arthur Rothstein, photographer. Farm Security Administration/Office of War Collection, Reproduction Number LC-USF34-024097-D. Prints and Photographs Collection.
  • Article
    Jewish Song in America Jewish immigration to the United States dates back to 1654, when a small group of Sephardic [1] Jewish settlers from Dutch Brazil arrived in New Amsterdam (later known as New York). Jews continued to trickle into the country from the Mediterranean region as well as from England, Holland and the Balkans during the Colonial period. During the mid-nineteenth century, a large influx of poor...
  • Article
    French American Song The songs and music of French Americans are tied to a complex history, which resulted in a diaspora of French-speaking people in several regions of what is now the United States. The story is further complicated through contact among French-speaking people of different histories, as well as subsequent contact with settlers from other countries and their descendants.
  • Article
    Persian American Song The United States is home to the largest number of Iranians outside of Iran, many of whom arrived in two major waves of immigration in the second half of the twentieth century. The first group of settlers arrived between 1950 and 1977, before the Islamic revolution of 1978-1979. An economically and politically favorable climate for travel at that time encouraged many highly-educated Iranians to...
  • Article
    Mexican American Song The relationship between Mexico and the United States, which share a border that is close to 2,000 miles long today, is a complex one.
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    Portuguese American Song Portuguese fado musicians Duarte Tavares and Olivete Maria Poulart perform at the IV Seasons Restaurant, Lowell, Massachusetts, November 14, 1987. Lowell Folklife Project Collection. Photo by John Lueders-Booth.
  • Article
    African American Song The Black Patti, Mme. M. Sissieretta Jones the greatest singer of her race. New York: Metropolitan Printing Co., 1899. Prints and Photographs Division, reproduction number: LC-USZC4-5164
  • Article
    Songs of Immigration and Migration - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections As Europeans colonized North America, beginning with the Spanish and French in the 1500s and the British and Dutch in the early 1600s, colonists brought their cultural entertainments along with them. Songs brought to colonial America continued to be sung in their early forms, so that later scholars of songs and ballads, such as the British ethnomusicologist Cecil Sharp and American ballad scholar Francis...
  • Article
    Historical Topics - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections The history of America is reflected through its songs. Read more about how immigration and migration; work and industry; social change; war and conflict; politics and political campaigns; and sports and leisure in the United States have been portrayed in song. Listen to examples for all.
  • Notated Music
    California warriors Notated Music. print | 1 score (3 pages) ; 35 cm | by Louis Carrion. (Statement Of Responsibility). Manuscript in ink. For voice and piano. Lyrics in Spanish. (Language). Staff notation. (Language). Print (Form). Unmediated (Form). Volume (Form).
    • Contributor: Carrion, Louis
    • Date: 1911
  • Notated Music
    Columbia the land of the brave sheet music | 2 p. | Arranged for the Spanish guitar. Sheet Music (Form).
    • Contributor: George Willig - Shaw, David T. - Blancjour, Fr.
    • Date: 1846
  • Notated Music
    On the bay of biscay Notated Music. print | 1 score (3 pages) ; 30 cm | words and music by Harold Robe. (Statement Of Responsibility). For voice and piano. Also available in digital form on the Library of Congress Web site. (Additional Physical Form). Staff notation. (Language). Print (Form). Unmediated (Form). Volume (Form).
    • Contributor: A. J. Stasny Music Co. - Robe, Harold - Robe, Harold A.
    • Date: 1918

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  • Article
    Printable Timeline - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections 1850 Songs of America Stephen Foster composes 'The Voice of Bygone Days', 'Molly, Do You Love Me?', and 'Ah! May the Red Rose Live Alway!' 'Go Down Moses,' a spiritual sung by the Tuskegee Institute Singers, 1914. Harriet Tubman reported using this song to identify herself to slaves that might want to escape and flee north with her by singing it in a neighboring...
  • Article
    Printable Timeline - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections 1900 Songs of America Amy Marcy Cheney Beach sets to music Three Browning Songs, including
  • Notated Music
    La bandera de las estrellas sheet music | 4 p., 12 x 9 in. | Spanish translation by Francis Haffkine Snow. This version of the song was prepared by the U.S. Bureau of Education. Sheet Music (Form).
    • Contributor: G. Schirmer - Smith, John Stafford - Damrosch, Walter - Key, Francis Scott
    • Date: 1919
  • Article
    Printable Timeline - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections 1759 Songs of America Francis Hopkinson (1737-1791) sets to music Doctor Parnell's 'My Days Have Been So Wondrous Free' – America's earliest surviving secular composition. Culture Voltaire (1694-1778) writes his satirical masterpiece Candide My days have been so wondrous free [manuscript] 1760 In the News George III becomes King of England. 1761 Songs of America 'Young Johnny,' sung by Winifred Bundy. Recorded by Helene...
  • Article
    Ritual and Worship - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections Sacred music has been a vibrant part of American culture from the earliest sacred oral traditions of indigenous peoples through the written traditions of the first European colonists. With the settlement of the Plymouth, Massachusetts colony in 1620, sacred music played an important role in helping to define the cultural identity of the region of the New World that would become the United States....
  • Article
    Printable Timeline - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections 1800 Songs of America James Hewitt (1770-1827) composes 'The Wounded Hussar.' Hon'hewachi Song from the Blue Spot ceremony, sung by a group of Omaha men and women. Recorded by Francis La Flesche, September, 1895. The purpose of the ceremony was to honor a female relative of a society member. La Flesche wrote that this song was composed by Old Blackbird of the White Horse...
  • Article
    Traditional Ballads - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections Introduction Traditional ballads are narrative folksongs - simply put, they are folksongs that tell stories. They tell all kinds of stories, including histories, legends, fairy tales, animal fables, jokes, and tales of outlaws and star-crossed lovers. (
  • Article
    Children's Songs - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections Children's songs may include songs that adults sing or teach to children, songs children pass along to each other, and songs that children compose themselves. These distinctions are not always clear cut, however, as adults may teach children songs that they learned from other children in childhood, and children may pass along songs learned from adults to other children. Playlist Five recordings from Library...