Collection Items

  • Film, Video
    The last fierce charge [illustrated] motion picture | 1 video ; 4 min. | Audio track taken from AFS 4214 B1 (General). Drawings from Library of Congress online resources. (General). Photos used: The Union & rebel officers taking the last drink after signing the papers of parole & exchange of prisoners, goodbye (http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2004661307/) -- [Soldier with blanket wrapped around shoulders] (http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.20254)-- Building pontoon bridges at Fredericksburg Dec. 11th (http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2004660225/) ...
    • Contributor: Ford, Warde
  • Film, Video
    I'm going down this road feeling bad [illustrated] motion picture | 1 video ; 2 min. | Audio track taken from AFC 1940/001: AFS 4206 A2 (General). Photographs from the Library of Congress online resources (General). Photos used: Shasta Dam, California. Shasta Dam under construction (http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8e01539 )-- Construction workers using tools to settle freshly-poured concrete, Shasta Dam. Shasta County, California ( http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8a29726) -- Warde Ford (http://memory.loc.gov/afc/afccc/p000/p016r.jpg) -- "Encamped at Boomtown [Central Valley] ...
    • Contributor: Ford, Warde - Cowell, Sidney Robertson
  • Article
    Songs of the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl Migrants "I'm Going Down this Road Feeling Bad," is a traditional song that may date from an earlier period, but that expresses sentiments surely felt by displaced workers during the Great Depression. In this presentation there are versions sung by Warde Ford, who traveled to Wisconsin to California to find work with the CCC and by Dust Bowl migrants Ruth Huber and Lois Judd.
  • Article
    English American Song As new song styles developed in the United States, they often made their way to England. Following tours by American minstrels in the 1860s, blackface minstrel shows and vaudeville were adapted and presented in England, and continued there longer than in the United States, inspiring The Black and White Minstrel Show television program that ran between 1958 and 1978. With the advent of radio ...
  • Article
    Francis James Child and The English and Scottish Popular Ballads During his years of editing the ballads, Child gained several more distinctions. By taking up a new professorship of English established at Harvard in 1876, Child became America's first English professor. In 1888, at the founding of the American Folklore Society, Child became its first president. The greatest distinction of all, however, was the impact he had on his friends, colleagues and students. He ...
  • Article
    Peace Songs of the Civil War Peace songs during and in aid of recovery from a civil war were one thing, peace songs and other expressions of pacifism during a foreign war might be seen as sedition. Mark Twain wrote his pacificist narrative poem "The War Prayer" in about 1904, in response to the Philippine-American War of 1899-1902. [2] Although the poem was written after the war, it tells of ...
  • Article
    Traditional Ballads - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections Introduction Traditional ballads are narrative folksongs - simply put, they are folksongs that tell stories. They tell all kinds of stories, including histories, legends, fairy tales, animal fables, jokes, and tales of outlaws and star-crossed lovers. (
  • Article
    Irish American Song In Addition to John McCormack, notable Irish American vocal music artists from the past include Victor Herbert (1859-1924), a Dublin-born conductor and popular composer of operettas; Bing Crosby (1901-1977), a singer and movie star; Gene Kelly (1912–1996), a singer, dancer and movie star; and Rosemary Clooney (1928-2002), a singer and movie star. Contemporary, well-known vocal artists of Irish American descent include Bruce Springsteen, Shania ...
  • Article
    Printable Timeline - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections 1850 Songs of America Stephen Foster composes 'The Voice of Bygone Days', 'Molly, Do You Love Me?', and 'Ah! May the Red Rose Live Alway!' 'Go Down Moses,' a spiritual sung by the Tuskegee Institute Singers, 1914. Harriet Tubman reported using this song to identify herself to slaves that might want to escape and flee north with her by singing it in a neighboring ...
  • Article
    War and Conflict - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections War has played no small part in the history of American song. Some of the nation's oldest folk and pop songs celebrate important victories, the experiences of soldiers and sailors, or the loss of loved ones. Playlist for War and Conflict Five recordings from Library of Congress collections describe the business of conflict in a human way. The Waltz must change to a march, ...
  • Article
    Regional Song Sampler: The Midwest Return to Mapping the Songs of America
  • Article
    Songs of Immigration and Migration - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections As Europeans colonized North America, beginning with the Spanish and French in the 1500s and the British and Dutch in the early 1600s, colonists brought their cultural entertainments along with them. Songs brought to colonial America continued to be sung in their early forms, so that later scholars of songs and ballads, such as the British ethnomusicologist Cecil Sharp and American ballad scholar Francis ...