Collection Items

  • Audio Recording
    John Henry Sung and played on guitar by Gabriel Brown. Long blues instrumental, with only one verse of the ballad sung. Recorded by Zora Neale Hurston, Eatonville, Florida, 1935. Alan Lomax, Zora Neale Hurston, and Mary Elizabeth Barnicle Expedition Collection. sound recording | 1 disc. | Alan Lomax, Zora Neale Hurston, and Mary Elizabeth Barnicle Expedition Collection. (Source). 1935. (Date). Sound Recording (Form).
    • Contributor: Brown, Gabriel - Hurston, Zora Neale - Lomax, Alan - Barnicle, Mary Elizabeth
  • Audio Recording
    Description of lining track
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Halimuhfack
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Mule on the Mount
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Let's Shake It
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Dat Old Black Gal
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Shove It Over
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Uncle Bud
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Crow Dance
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Wake Up, Jacob
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Georgia Skin
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Let the Deal Go Down
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Tilly, Lend Me Your Pigeon
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Gonna See My Long-Haired Babe
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Oh, the Buford Boat Done Come
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Po' Gal
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Mama Don't Want No Peas, No Rice
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Evalina
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hurston, Zora Neale - Corse, Carita Doggett, 1892
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Oh Mr. Brown
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Corse, Carita Doggett, 1892 - Hurston, Zora Neale
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Stewboy
    • Contributor: Kennedy, Stetson - Halpert, Herbert - Hazelhurst, Harold
    • Date: 1939-06-18
  • Audio Recording
    Uncle Bud
    • Contributor: Corse, Carita Doggett, 1892 - Cornwall, Robert - Brown, James - Bland, Rufus
    • Date: 1940-07-01
  • Article
    Songs of the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl Migrants "I'm Going Down this Road Feeling Bad," is a traditional song that may date from an earlier period, but that expresses sentiments surely felt by displaced workers during the Great Depression. In this presentation there are versions sung by Warde Ford, who traveled to Wisconsin to California to find work with the CCC and by Dust Bowl migrants Ruth Huber and Lois Judd.
  • Article
    " John Henry" Whether or not the legend has an historical basis, the story of a man whose worth and identity are measured only by his strength, which is then challenged by the advent of steam power, is one that has endured for over a century. John Henry's complaint to the work "captain," "A man ain't nothing but a man," found in most versions of the ballad, ...
  • Article
    Bahamian American Song A relatively new style of music in the 1930s and 40s when these recordings were made was jazz, using the piano and brass instead of, or sometimes in addition to, traditional Bahamian instruments. For example, a traditional version of the Bahamian song "Hoist Up the John B Sail" is sung by Robert Butler accompanied by Theodore "Tea Roll" Rolle. Rolle, a jazz composer, singer, ...
  • Article
    Regional Song Sampler: The Southeast Return to Mapping the Songs of America