Collection Items

  • Audio Recording
    The American soldier Speech by Warren G. Harding, Senator of Ohio. "My countrymen. Though not in any partisan sense, I must speak of the services of the men and women who rallied to the colors of the Republic in the World War. America realizes and appreciates the services rendered." Text excerpted from hist Speech accepting the Republican Presidential nomination, June 12, 1920.
    • Contributor: Harding, Warren G. (Warren Gamaliel) - Nation's Forum Collection (Library of Congress) - A.F.R. Lawrence Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1920
  • Audio Recording
    Safeguard America! Speech by Mrs. Corinne Roosevelt Robinson, sister of President Theodore Roosevelt, supporting the Republican ticket of "Senator Harding and Governor Coolidge" as "100% American, true patriotism, who have not failed to show marked efficiency and ability in public office."
    • Contributor: Robinson, Corinne Roosevelt - Nation's Forum Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1920
  • Audio Recording
    Theodore Roosevelt Speech by General Leonard Wood. "Theodore Roosevelt was the most dominating and inspiring character in American life except for Lincoln ... He loved America."
    • Contributor: Wood, Leonard - Nation's Forum Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1920
  • Audio Recording
    Equal rights Fourth of July oration by Governor Calvin Coolidge to celebrate "the beginning of a government that was to recognize the power, the worth, and the dignity of man."
    • Contributor: Coolidge, Calvin - Nation's Forum Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1920
  • Audio Recording
    The duty of government
    Duty
    Speech by Calvin Coolidge, Governor of Massachusetts. "Law must rest upon the eternal foundations of righteousness... The government is founded upon a righteousness which will endure."
    • Contributor: Coolidge, Calvin - Nation's Forum Collection (Library of Congress) - A.F.R. Lawrence Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1920
  • Audio Recording
    Americanism Speech by Warren G. Harding, U.S. Senator of Ohio. "Americanism really began when it was robed in nationality... In the spirit of Americanism, we proclaim America, we acclaim America."
    • Contributor: Harding, Warren G. (Warren Gamaliel) - Nation's Forum Collection (Library of Congress) - A.F.R. Lawrence Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1920
  • Audio Recording
    Nationalism and Americanism Speech by Warren G. Harding, Senator of Ohio. "We need to be rescued from divisionary and fruitless pursuit of peace through super government."
    • Contributor: Harding, Warren G. (Warren Gamaliel) - Nation's Forum Collection (Library of Congress) - A.F.R. Lawrence Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1920
  • Audio Recording
    Liberty under the law Speech by Warren G. Harding, U.S. Senator of Ohio. "My countrymen:....It would be the blindness of folly to ignore the activities in our own country that are aimed to destroy our economic system." The presidential candidate concludes. "We call on all Americans for steadiness."
    • Contributor: Harding, Warren G. (Warren Gamaliel) - Nation's Forum Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1920
  • Audio Recording
    Law and order Speech by Calvin Coolidge, Governor of Massachusetts. "Government is not and must not be a cold, impersonal machine...government must govern. To obey is life; to disobey is death. Organized government is the expression of the life of the commonwealth." Coolidge calls for opposing "imported ideas" and for "prosecution of the criminals and education of the ignorant."
    • Contributor: Coolidge, Calvin - Nation's Forum Collection (Library of Congress) - A.F.R. Lawrence Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1920
  • Audio Recording
    Law and order Speech by Calvin Coolidge, Governor of Massachusetts. "Government is not and must not be a cold, impersonal machine...government must govern. To obey is life; to disobey is death. Organized government is the expression of the life of the commonwealth." Coolidge calls for opposing "imported ideas" and for "prosecution of the criminals and education of the ignorant."
    • Contributor: Coolidge, Calvin - Nation's Forum Collection (Library of Congress) - A.F.R. Lawrence Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1920
  • Audio Recording
    Law and order Speech by Calvin Coolidge, Governor of Massachusetts. "Government is not and must not be a cold, impersonal machine...government must govern. To obey is life; to disobey is death. Organized government is the expression of the life of the commonwealth." Coolidge calls for opposing "imported ideas" and for "prosecution of the criminals and education of the ignorant."
    • Contributor: Coolidge, Calvin - Nation's Forum Collection (Library of Congress) - A.F.R. Lawrence Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1920
  • Audio Recording
    Law and order Speech by Calvin Coolidge, Governor of Massachusetts. "Government is not and must not be a cold, impersonal machine...government must govern. To obey is life; to disobey is death. Organized government is the expression of the life of the commonwealth." Coolidge calls for opposing "imported ideas" and for "prosecution of the criminals and education of the ignorant."
    • Contributor: Coolidge, Calvin - Nation's Forum Collection (Library of Congress) - A.F.R. Lawrence Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1920
  • Audio Recording
    Save America Speech by Nicholas Murray Butler, president of Columbia University. "There are elements in our population which teach doctrines that sound strange to the American ear. Such men frankly proclaim their preference for the political philosophy of Lenin and Trotsky to those of Washington, Hamilton, Jefferson, Webster and Lincoln. The issue is a preservation of the American form of government, with its incomparable blessing of...
    • Contributor: Butler, Nicholas Murray - Nation's Forum Collection (Library of Congress) - A.F.R. Lawrence Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1920
  • Audio Recording
    Save America Speech by Nicholas Murray Butler, president of Columbia University. "There are elements in our population which teach doctrines that sound strange to the American ear. Such men frankly proclaim their preference for the political philosophy of Lenin and Trotsky to those of Washington, Hamilton, Jefferson, Webster and Lincoln. The issue is a preservation of the American form of government, with its incomparable blessing of...
    • Contributor: Butler, Nicholas Murray - Nation's Forum Collection (Library of Congress) - A.F.R. Lawrence Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1920