Skip to main content

Exhibition Comic Art: 120 Years of Panels and Pages

Raina Telgemeier (b. 1977). Take-Out, no. 2. New York: Raina Telgemeier, 2002. Heidi MacDonald Mini-Comics Collection, Serial and Government Publications Division, Library of Congress (046.00.00) Courtesy of Raina Telgemeier © 2002, used with permission.
Enlarge
Raina Telgemeier (b. 1977). Take-Out, no. 3. New York: Raina Telgemeier, 2002. Heidi MacDonald Mini-Comics Collection, Serial and Government Publications Division, Library of Congress (047.00.00) Courtesy of Raina Telgemeier © 2002, used with permission.
Enlarge
Eleanor Davis. I’ve Lost My Spots. Athens, Georgia: E. Davis, 2003. Matt Dembicki Mini-Comics Collection, Serial and Government Publications Division, Library of Congress (047.01.00)
Eleanor Davis and Drew Weing. Bugbear, no. 1. Athens, Georgia: Little House Comics, 2006. Heidi MacDonald Mini-Comics Collection, Serial and Government Publications Division, Library of Congress (046.01.00) © Eleanor Davis and Drew Weing, used with permission
Enlarge

Minicomics

Minicomics are self-published, limited edition, and usually small-sized publications. They grew out of the Underground Comix movement of the 1960s and 1970s and helped cultivate the work of now renowned comics artists, such as Trina Robbins and Art Spiegelman. Known for her award-winning graphic novels, including Smile and Sisters, Raina Telgemeier started her comics career creating minicomics that were sold and distributed at conventions such as SPX. Telgemeier’s publisher plans an initial print run of one million for her next book. Eisner Award winning artist Eleanor Davis, whose recent graphic novel Why Art? won an Ignatz Award in 2018, started her comics career making self-published minicomics that were sold and distributed at conventions such as the annual Small Press Expo in Bethesda, Maryland.

 Back to top