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Exhibition Join In: Voluntary Assocations in America

The Jewish Immigrant, January 1909. New York: Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, 1909. African and Middle Eastern Division, Library of Congress (045.00.00)
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The Jewish Immigrant, January 1909. New York: Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, 1909. African and Middle Eastern Division, Library of Congress (045.00.00)
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The Jewish Immigrant, January 1909. New York: Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, 1909. African and Middle Eastern Division, Library of Congress (045.00.00)
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The Jewish Immigration Bulletin, vol. 5, no. 7, July, 1915. General Collections, Library of Congress (046.00.00)
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The Jewish Immigration Bulletin, vol. 5, no. 7, July, 1915. General Collections, Library of Congress (046.00.00)
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Marilynn K. Yee (b. 1950), photographer. Svetlana and Manashe Babayev with Their Children, Larisa, 8 years old, Zina, 7, and Oxsana, 4, at Rear, after Arriving Recently at Kennedy International Airport [from the Soviet Union], 1989. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress (047.00.00)
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Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society

Following a wave of pogroms—violent anti-Jewish riots—that took place in the Russian Empire in 1881, a group of Jewish Americans in Manhattan organized the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS) to help Jewish refugees from Russia manage their arrival and adjustment to America. Its first efforts were providing immigrants with meals, transportation, jobs, and information. In the twentieth century, it grew to include worldwide resettlement efforts for Jewish people attempting to escape from Europe, Iran, and the Soviet Union. In the twenty-first century, HIAS has expanded to supply aid and relief to refugees of all religions, nationalities and ethnicities.