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Exhibition Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote

Harris & Ewing. Some of the Picket Line of Nov. 10. Photograph. November 10, 1917. NWP Records, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (100.00.00)
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Cora A. Week’s (1861–1951) name badge with tricolor ribbon, Congressional Union Convention, December 1915. NWP Records, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (099.00.00)
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Tricolor sash, Congressional Union/National Woman’s Party. NWP Records, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (099.01.00)
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“Votes for Women” pinback button, designed by Sylvia Pankhurst for the British Women’s Social and Political Union. NWP Records, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (099.02.00)
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“Votes for Women,” Women’s Political Union, New York, pinback button. NWP Records, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (099.03.00)
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Cora A. Week’s (1861–1951) pinback buttons, circa 1915: “Vote Yes Woman Suffrage October 19,” New Jersey, 1915.” NWP Records, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (099.04.00)
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Cora A. Week’s (1861–1951) pinback buttons, circa 1915: “Vote for Woman Suffrage Nov. 2, 1815–1915, Elizabeth Cady Stanton Centennial.” NWP Records, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (099.07.00)
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Cora A. Week’s (1861–1951) pinback buttons, circa 1915: “Third Liberty Loan.” NWP Records, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (099.08.00)
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Suffrage Prisoner Cora A. Week

Wisconsin-born New York artist Cora Alice Week (fifth from left), daughter of Norwegian immigrants, was nearly fifty-six when arrested on November 10, 1917, as part of a massive picket protesting the “wanton persecution” of NWP leader Alice Paul, who was serving a seven-month sentence for “obstructing traffic.” Week was released without sentence on November 12, and within hours, returned to the picket line, only to be rearrested. Her tricolor sash, delegate badge, and her buttons reflect suffrage organizations in Washington, New Jersey, New York, and London, and her support for the war effort via liberty loans.
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