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Exhibition Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote

Leaflet and pledge form, “Votes for Women Inaugural Parade, Washington, D.C., March 3, 1913.” NWP Records, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (063.00.00)
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Harris & Ewing. “Distributing hand bills advertising Inaugural Suffrage Parade. . . . Washington, D.C., 1913.” Photograph. NWP Records, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (062.00.00)
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“The Most Conspicuous and Important Demonstration”

Alice Paul (1885–1977) and Lucy Burns (1879–1966), graduate students studying abroad who met in a British prison during that country’s suffrage campaign, sought to inject more militancy into the American movement. They began planning a massive national parade, modeled on the elaborate pageants in Britain and the marches in New York, to be held in Washington, D.C., on the eve of President Woodrow Wilson’s inauguration. Handbills and pledge cards, with helpful logistical details, were widely distributed for this “most conspicuous and important demonstration.”

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