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Exhibition Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote

Sunflower Ribbon Pin. Alice Park Collection. On loan from Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and transferred from the NAWSA Records, Library of Congress (066.01.00)
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Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage. Metal pin with enameled sections owned by Alice Paul. Inc. On loan from Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. Gift of Alice Paul Centennial Foundation (118.00.00)
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Pin It! “Show Your Colors All Day Long”

Pins and buttons proliferated as the suffrage movement matured. As California suffragist Alice Park (1861–1961) suggested, pins aroused “curiosity among strangers,” and wearing one’s “colors all day long” provided opportunities to lobby tradesmen, salespeople, and passersby. This sunflower pin, owned by Park, was a nod to the 1867 Kansas referendum, during which the state flower and its yellow color became synonymous with suffrage. The Congressional Union (CU) for Woman Suffrage pin belonged to Alice Paul, who formed the group as a NAWSA auxiliary in April 1913. The CU became independent in February 1914 and eventually merged in March 1917 with the National Woman’s Party, founded the previous June.

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