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  • Film, Video
    Dorie Ann Ladner and Joyce Ladner oral history interview conducted by Joseph Mosnier in Washington, D.C., 2011-09-20. Doris and Joyce Ladner discuss organizing for the March on Washington with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). Dorie Ladner recalls her work with SNCC in Natchez, Mississippi, and the murder and trial of Medgar Evers. They both remember growing up in Palmers Crossing, Mississippi, their family history, joining the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) youth chapter led by Clyde ...
    • Contributor: Civil Rights History Project (U.S.) - Mosnier, Joseph - Ladner, Dorie - Ladner, Joyce A.
    • Date: 2011-09-20

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  • Film, Video
    James "Super Chikan" Johnson and Richard Christman James "Super Chikan" Johnson and Richard Christman performs Mississippi blues songs and music at the Library of Congress, May 23, 2006. videorecording | videorecording ; 62 min | Homegrown Concert Series. (Source). May 23, 2006. (Date). Videorecording (Form).
    • Contributor: Library of Congress - Super Chikan - Christman, Richard
    • Date: 2006
  • Film, Video
    Lawrence Guyot oral history interview conducted by Julian Bond in Washington, D.C., 2010-12-30. Lawrence Guyot recalls growing up in Pass Christian, Mississippi, and the influence of his family, and attending Tougaloo College. He remembers meeting members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), joining the organization, and participating in Freedom Summer. He discusses his opinions and memories of Mississippi politics, the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, and his later life in Washington, D. C.
    • Contributor: Civil Rights History Project (U.S.) - Bond, Julian - Guyot, Lawrence
    • Date: 2010-12-30

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    We Had Sneakers, They Had Guns: The Kids Who Fought for Civil Rights in Mississippi As an illustrator and journalist, Tracy Sugarman covered the nearly one thousand student volunteers who traveled to the Mississippi Delta to assist black citizens in the South in registering to vote. Two white students and one black student were slain in the struggle, many were beaten and hundreds arrested, and churches and homes were burned to the ground by the opponents of equality. Yet ...
    • Contributor: Sugarman, Tracy - American Folklife Center - Archive of Folk Culture (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 2009-05-05