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2014 Homegrown Concerts

Online Archive of Past Homegrown Concerts

All of the materials from the Homegrown Concert Series are available to visitors in the Folklife Reading Room. Selected materials will be made available online as digital versions are available. Scroll down to see available webcasts and event essays for the 2014.

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Kevin Doyle dancing with musicians behind him
Kevin Doyle.
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Kevin Doyle: Irish Step Dance

September 18, 2014
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 01:00:35

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Irish step dancer Kevin Doyle of Barrington, Rhode Island, first learned Irish step dancing as a child from his mother, who learned the steps from her mother in Ireland's County Roscommon. From the age of ten, Doyle competed successfully in many East Coast feis (competitions), earning U.S. Irish Dance Champion honors. He teaches and performs with Rhode Island Celtic music performers Pendragon, folk performers Atwater-Donnelly, and international Irish dance ensemble Atlantic Steps. Doyle is a recipient of a 2014 National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellowship, the nation's highest honor in the folk and traditional arts. In today’s concert he will perform with an all-star lineup of Irish musicians, including 2013 Heritage Fellow Séamus Connolly. This concert is co-sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Council for the Traditional Arts.

Son Jarocho Master Musicians: César Castro, Artemio Posadas, and Luis Sarimientos

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A man and a woman standing, playing smal guitars
César Castro and his student, Xochi Flores, two of the artists who will be performing.
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September 11, 2014
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

Read the article: "Fandango: Convivial Sharing," by Russell Rodríguez and Quetzal Flores in Folklife Today, September 4, 2014.

View the webcast Running time 01:02:38

And on Library of Congress YouTube

During the 1970s the folk musical style called son Jarocho, from southern Veracruz, Mexico, underwent a revitalization. The central traditional social gathering, the fandango, was reinvigorated, widely popularizing the complex of music, song, dance, and poetry that are all part of this tradition. The revitalization ultimately spread beyond the region, becoming a popular manner for Mexican communities to gather. In the early 1990s, fandangos began spreading to Northern California and, by 2000, people throughout California were learning to play instruments, create verses, and learn  dances in order to participate in the fandango gatherings. For this performance The Alliance for California Traditional Arts will curate a presentation of some of the key master artists and their apprentices from Northern and Southern California who are deeply integrated into this transnational cultural phenomenon.

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The Quebe Sisters
The Quebe Sisters.
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The Quebe Sisters Band: Texas Fiddling and Swing

August 20, 2014
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

Read the article: "The Quebe Sisters: Western Swing & Texas-Style Fiddle," by Charles Lockwood. Posted in Folklife Today, August 15, 2014.

View the Webcast Running time 01:05:08

And on Library of Congress YouTube

The Quebe Sisters Band is composed of Grace, Sophia and Hulda Quebe (pronounced Kway-bee), who all sing and play the fiddle, and the Clark twins, Penny Lea (guitar and mandolin) and Katy Lou (banjo, piano, and accordion). They perform a refreshing blend of Texas-style fiddling, vintage country, bluegrass, and jazz & swing standards. The Quebes’ unique brand of music has taken the Americana music scene by storm. They have been awarded the Crescendo Award by the Western Music Association and the Western Swing Album of the Year from the Academy of Western Artists. They have appeared at the Grand Ole Opry, the Kennedy Center, NYC's Lincoln Center, the Ryman Auditorium, the Marty Stuart Show, the Eddie Stubbs Show on WSM, The Birchmere, the Ernest Tubb Midnite Jamboree (as host band), the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, multiple European tours and the National Folk Festival. They have appeared in concert with Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder, Merle Haggard, Asleep at the Wheel, Larry Gatlin & the Gatlin Brothers, Riders in the Sky, and Marty Stuart. They have also had the honor of performing for President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush.

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Penny Lea and Katy Lou Clark
Penny Lea and Katy Lou Clark.
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In 1998 the Quebes heard Texas-style fiddling for the first time at a fiddle contest in Denton, Texas. At ages seven, ten and twelve  they started taking fiddle lessons from Joey and Sherry McKenzie. Soon afterwards, the girls began competing in fiddle contests and won regional, state and national championships. Since then the Quebes' repertoire has grown to include a wide variety of styles. It was only natural to add three-part harmony vocals, and in January 2005 they debuted their singing at the National Cowboy Poetry & Music Gathering in Elko, Nevada. A short list of bands and musicians that influence and inspire the Quebes include Bob Wills & the Texas Playboys, Spade Cooley, Benny Goodman, Ella Fitzgerald, Quintet of the Hot Club of France, the Mills Brothers, the Sons of the Pioneers, Andy Parker and the Plainsmen, Connie Smith, Ray Price, Marty Robbins, Patsy Cline, the Boswell Sisters, the Andrews Sisters, the McGuire Sisters, the Beatles, and Hot Rize.

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Carlos Núñez
Carlos Núñez.
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Carlos Núñez: Galician Bagpipes and Flutes

August 19, 2014
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 00:59:26

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Carlos Núñez is a world-famous bagpiper and flutist fromGalicia in Spain. Galicians trace their ancestry not only to Iberians but also to Celtic peoples, and their musical traditions reflect a connection to Ireland, Scotland, and Brittany. Núñez  is a traditional bagpiper as well as a classically-trained flute and recorder virtuoso.  He has played with the Chieftains, Ry Cooder, Altan, Sinead O’Connor, Hector Zazou, Philip Pickett, and Tamiya Terashima, to name only a few.  He has also performed with symphony orchestras and classical ensembles, and has appeared on prestigious stages the world over.  In this performance Núñez is accompanied by a four-member band and is joined by special guests Judith Cohen, Stephen Winick, and Jennifer Cutting.

This concert features a special emphasis on the music collected by Alan Lomax in Galicia in the 1950s, which are part of the AFC Archive, and which have inspired numerous musicians including Miles Davis. Núñez has visited the American Folklife Center several times to research this important collection. In this concert, Núñez and band members Pancho Álvarez and Xurxo Núñez, are joined by Stephanie Cadman, Jennifer Cutting, Judith Cohen, and Stephen Winick.

Phil Wiggins and Friends: Acoustic Blues and Dance from Maryland

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Phil Wiggins
Phil Wiggins.
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August 6, 2014
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 01:01:08

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Phil Wiggins and Friends is an all-star blues and dance group including Phil Wiggins (harmonica), Rick Franklin (guitar and vocals) Marcus Moore (violin) and Junious Brickhouse (dance). According to the National Council for Traditional Arts, "Phil Wiggins is arguably America’s foremost blues harmonica virtuoso. While rooted in the melodic Piedmont or ‘Tidewater’ blues of the Chesapeake region, his mastery of the instrument now transcends stylistic boundaries.  Born in Washington D.C. in 1954, Phil Wiggins achieved worldwide acclaim over three decades as one half of the premier Piedmont blues duo of Cephas & Wiggins. Since the death of guitarist and singer John Cephas in 2009, Phil has brought his harmonica wizardry to bear in a variety of musical collaborations."  Rick Franklin has been entertaining D.C.-area audiences with his own mixture of traditional Piedmont blues and early commercial "hokum" blues for over thirty years, and is one of the area’s favorite blues musicians.  Marcus Childs Moore is a Marion, Alabama native who earned his bachelors in Jazz Violin Performance from City College of New York in 2009, has performed with numerous musical greats and legends, and was a member of the Harlem Symphony Orchestra for two years. Junious "House" Brickhouse is an award-winning urban dance educator, choreographer, community leader, and cultural preservationist whose latest project is called "The Meaning of Buck Dance."

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Junious "House" Brickhouse
Junious "House" Brickhouse.
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Junious "House" Brickhouse is an internationally established, award winning, urban dance educator, choreographer, community leader, and cultural preservationist. A Virginia Beach, Virginia native, Junious has a spent over twenty years in dance cyphers and on stages from Oakland, California to Helsinki, Finland to Durban, South Africa. Now based in Washington, DC, Junious furthers his global mission through lecturing, performing, promoting conflict resolution, and event production for Urban Artistry, Inc.  As Founder and Executive Director of Urban Artistry, Inc., Junious has inspired and created a movement of artists dedicated to the authentic preservation of urban dance culture and community while finding ways to responsibly innovate.

 

Sounds of Korea: Traditional Music and Dance from New York

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Sounds of Korea
Sounds of Korea.
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July 23, 2014
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 01:04:08

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Sounds of Korea is part of the New-York-based Korean Performing Arts Center (KPAC), consisting of a dance troupe, an instrumental chamber ensemble and a percussion ensemble. Korean performance art includes a wide range of styles and settings, such as classical court music, theatrical masked dance, popular storytelling songs, drama, popular narrative vocal arts, and solo instrumental folk genres, as well as the percussion music and dances of farmers. The group’s artistic emphasis is on the subtle grace and beauty found in Korean traditional dances in which the dancers with powerful, yet delicate, gestures and movements reveal a unique aesthetic beauty. The dance troupe was founded and developed by Sue Yeon Park at the organization's inception in 1993, and has maintained an active performance schedule over the past 20 years. Under Park’s direction, the organization has performed and hosted performances at major concert venues in the U.S., including Lincoln Center, national museums and national festival stages, introducing Korean music and dance to a wide array of audiences of diverse cultural backgrounds. In addition, Sounds of Korea performance troupe participates in community outreach programs, as well as cultural exhibitions. Its members consist of professionals of the highest caliber and individuals from the Korean community who are dedicated to promoting intercultural understanding and appreciation of Korea’s artistic heritage and history.

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Winyo seated with guitar
Winyo.
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Winyo: Benga and Traditional Music from Kenya

July 1, 2014
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

Read the flyer essay [PDF, 2 pp., 1.1MB]

View the webcast Running time 01:01:53

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Born Shiphton Onyango, Winyo adopted the artistic name "Winyo," which is a Luo word for "bird." (The Luo are a tribe from the Lake Victoria region of Western Kenya.) He says that he derives his music and musical strength from his forefathers, whose African music was rich in melody and traditional harmonies. His musical styles include traditional Luo songs infused with witty storylines, Afro fusion, Afro jazz, and Benga (a mix of contemporary music with traditional Kenyan Luo music in which the guitar is played to mimic a Luo eight-string lyre called a nyatiti). Winyo sings in Dholuo, Swahili, and English. He began his career as the lead singer and composer for the band Rateng and now performs with his own four-piece band. His album, Benga Blues, was released in 2012.

Winyo will be among the Kenyan artists performing at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival’s Kenya: Mambo Poa program. The festival will present the ways in which the people of Kenya are balancing protection of their valued cultural and natural heritage with the challenges and opportunities for change in the twenty-first century.

This program is produced in partnership with the Government of Kenya Ministry of Sports, Culture and the Arts. Learn more about the Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Mambo Poa Kenya.

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Andrei Pidkivka, Solomia Gorokhivska, and Kalin Kirilov
Andrei Pidkivka, Solomia Gorokhivska, and Kalin Kirilov
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Gerdan: Kaleidoscope of World Music

May 22, 2015 at noon
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

Read the flyer essay [PDF, 2 pp., 2MB]

View the webcast Running time 01:05:51

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Gerdan, which means "‘Necklace" in Ukrainian, combines the inspired musicianship of Andrei Pidkivka (flutes of the world), Solomia Gorokhivska (violin) and Kalin Kirilov to present musical traditions of Ukraine.

Andrei Pidkivka studied classical and world music at Lviv State College and Music Academy in Ukraine and holds a Doctorate of Music Arts Degree from Michigan State University. He has performed as a soloist and guest musician with a number of orchestras including the Seattle Symphony and the Baltimore Symphony. He is a preeminent performer, teacher, and maker of a variety of folk flutes of his native Ukraine, and has performed widely in the United States, Europe, Asia and South America.

Solomia Gorokhivska is also a native of Ukraine, and holds a Doctorate of Musical Arts Degree at the Catholic University of America. She has toured internationally, including Ukraine, Germany, Russia, Poland, Serbia, and the USA. From 2006-2010 she was a musicologist, journalist, author, and senior editor for the TV program “Along With The Music” on the National Broadcast Company of Ukraine.

Kalin Kirilov is an Assistant Professor of Music Theory at Towson University. Before coming to Towson University, he taught at the University of Oregon and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Kirilov received his BA from the Academy of Music and Dance in Plovdiv, Bulgaria, an interdisciplinary MA in Folklore from the University of Oregon. A master of multiple instruments, Kirilov has performed extensively in Bulgaria, Western Europe, and the United States. In 2003 and 2005, he toured the United States with Ivo Papasov, recipient of the 2005 BBC audience award in the "world music" category.

Spyros Koliavasilis & Karpouzi Trio: Music from Greece and Asia Minor

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Karpouzi Trio
Karpouzi Trio.
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May 7, 2015 at noon
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

Read the flyer essay [PDF, 2 pp., 390KB]

View the webcast Running time 01:01:55

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Karpouzi plays music on traditional instruments from the Greek mainland and islands. The band loves to play for dance parties and community celebrations, and always, even in concerts, invites the audience out of their seats and onto the dance floor! Karpouzi members are Spyros Koliavasilis (vocals, oud, and the Cappadocian lyra or kemane), Margaret Loomis (santouri) and Len Newman (laouto).

Dr. Spyros Koliavasilis is a gifted vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, playing and teaching oud, bouzouki, saz, kemane, laouto and lavta as well as canto. He plays over 18 instruments, some learned in his native Greece and some when a medical student in Romania. Music is his true passion (although he always says medicine and music have gone together since ancient times). 

In addition to his formal studies in Greece, Spyros studied voice and oud with the great masters Nikos and Yiasemi Saragoudas. He founded the band Ανατολιτικα Χρωματα (Anatolitika Chromata "Eastern Colors") which played concerts in Greece and around the world. He is honored to have performed with and learned from Saragoudas and great artists like Halil Karaduman, the great Turkish kanun master; Domna Samiou, the singer and folklorist who probably did most to preserve Greek traditional music for our generation; and Chronis Aidonidis, the most renowned and respected singer of Greek Thracian repertoire in our era. Spyros is proudly dedicated to carry on the traditions of Nikos Saragoudas and is the only student on whom the master saw fit to bestow an academic certificate, attesting to his outstanding qualifications and dedication to carry on these traditions. 

Spyros’s research focuses on the music, composers and singers of the past. His area of special scholarship has been the Asia Minor region called "Mikrasia," but his interests and expertise are panhellenic. He loves everything original and is passionate about keeping traditions alive for the coming generations. An M.D., Spyros also has been awarded an honorary degree from the University of Tulsa for his musical scholarship. His next research project will focus on the clarinet traditions in and around Mesogeia in Attica, near his birthplace in Markopoulo.

Spyros also composes music. His CD, "Mediterranean Thoughts," contains his compositions as well as original arrangements and improvisations on traditional music.

Dr. Koliavasilis teaches in the Metropolitan DC area. His studio is a place of local interest, not only because of his lessons and many workshops, year round, but also because he restores and exhibits old instruments of great beauty, value and variety.

Margaret Loomis first heard the magical sound of Greek santouri in 1983 at a Balkan music and dance workshop in upstate New York. She began teaching herself to play from Greek recordings, with annual lessons from master player John Roussos. Margaret also enjoys occasional forays into Romanian music, inspired by the wonderful late Romanian fiddler, George Caba, and plays bunkula with the Resia Valley Girls.

Len Newman has loved Balkan traditional music and dance since his student days. He also performs with other ensembles, most notably Lyuti Chushki, playing the Bulgarian stringed instrument, tambura.

Torcuato Zamora: Flamenco guitar with dancers from Furia Flamenco

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Torcuato Zamora
Torcuato Zamora.
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April 23, 2015 at noon
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

Read the flyer essay [PDF, 2 pp., 691KB]

View the webcast Running time 00:55:25

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Torcuato Zamora was born amidst the rhythms and legends of Granada in Spain. At the age of five he moved to Barcelona where he began studying classical guitar; by age fifteen he began giving concerts professionally with Ramón Delgado and Graciano Tarragó. He has performed for the King and Queen of Spain. His has also performed in Luxembourg, France, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Canada. In the 1960s he came to the U.S., and since then he has devoted himself to presenting flamenco and classical, South American music, and his own compositions. He has toured the U.S. with the José Molina Spanish Dance Company. Credited for bringing flamenco to the DC Metro area, over the years he has appeared at El Bodegón, El Caribe Restaurant, El Caminante, Torremolinos, and Andalucia Restaurant, the Embassy of France, and theaters too numerous to mention. He has his own Academy of Spanish and Classical guitar in Silver Spring, Maryland. In 2010, his autobiography El Cortijo was published.

Dr. Nader Majd & Farshid Mahjour: Traditional Classical Persian Music

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Nader Majd
Nader Majd.
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April 16, 2015 at noon
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

Read the flyer essay [PDF, 2 pp., 176KB]

View the Webcast Running time 00:57:37

And on Library of Congress YouTube

An economist by training, Nader Majd is one of the founders of the Iranian Cultural Society in Washington D.C., and the co-founder of the Saba and Rouholah Khaleghi Ensembles. He was born in Sari, Iran in November 1944, and learned Santur (hammered dulcimer) and violin at the age of six. A year later, he received his education in Tar and Setar (plucked instruments) from his father and uncles, who were all gifted musicians. At the age ten, he learned Kamancheh (spike fiddle). In 1997, Nader established the Center for Persian Classical Music in Vienna, Virginia where he serves as director. He is also the music director and conductor of the Chakavak Ensemble. Nader has participated in several concerts and radio and TV shows. He has composed many songs including pieces for orchestra and vocal, overture, and reng (dance songs). Nader has written numerous articles, and his poetry book, Tajan (the name of a river in his native land), was published in 1984. He lives with his wife and two children in Ashburn, Virginia. Farshid Mahjour was born in Isfahan, Iran in 1968. He graduated from the school of electrical engineering in Isfahan. Farshid started playing Tombak at the age of seven. His teachers were renowned Iranian Tombak players: Farhang Far and Rajavi. He has participated in many concerts and events with different groups and Nader Majd in venues such as the Hill Center in Washington, D.C., and Virginia Tech. Presently he teaches Tombak and Daf at the Bahai Center in Virginia.

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Amadou Kouyate playing the kora
Amadou Kouyate.
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Amadou Kouyate: Traditional Music of Senegal and Mali

March 26, 2015 at noon
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

Read the flyer essay [PDF, 2 pp., 1.81MB]

Amadou Kouyate is the 150th generation of the Kouyate family of Manding Diali (oral historians/musicians of West Africa). Amadou performs on the 21-string Kora, as well as Djembe and Koutiro drums. His repertoire ranges from traditional songs from the 13th century to original compositions incorporating blues and jazz riffs. In addition to his solo work, Amadou performs with his world rock ensemble Proper SKANKS as well as with Farafina Kan, Manding Jata, Spank Rock, Urban Afrikan, and The Kouyate Family/Memory of African Culture. His credits include performances at The Kennedy Center, Smithsonian Institution, Bristol Academy and Isle of Wight in England, Tim Festival in Brazil, as well as the Lowell, East-Lansing and Dayton National Folk Festivals, Carnegie Hall with Sweet Honey in The Rock, National Geographic, and the Victoria World Rhythm Festival. He has received awards from the Maryland State Arts Council, Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County, DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, Howard University and Levine School of Music. Amadou has studied in Mali, Senegal, Guinea and Cote d’Ivoire with master musicians of the Diali tradition including Djimo Kouyate and Toumani Diabate. Amadou was most recently an Adjunct Lecturer of African Music and Ethnomusicology at the University of Maryland before pursuing his career as a full-time professional musician.

 

Tzvetelina Dosseva Weiner, Valeri Georgiev, and Varol Saatcıoğlu: Traditional Turkish and Bulgarian Instrumental and Vocal Music

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Tzvetelina Dosseva Weiner, Valeri Georgiev, and Varol Saatcıoğlu
Varol Saatcıoğlu, Tzvetelina Dosseva Weiner, and Valeri Georgiev.
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March 5, 2015 at noon
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 00:57:13

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Tzvety Weiner (vocals) was born in Plovdiv, Bulgaria, and raised in a family steeped in Bulgarian folk music, but she didn't start singing it until coming to the United States in 1998. Tzvety's parents are both well-known and highly respected musicians in Bulgaria, and since she began singing in Washington, D.C. with the traditional Bulgarian band Lyuti Chushki she has also collaborated with her parents on CD projects in Bulgaria. In addition, Tzvety sings with the traditional Macedonian band Luk Na Glavata, and with a local women's group, Slaveya.

Valeri Georgiev (kaval) was born in the village of Nikopol in northern Bulgaria and has been playing kaval since his youth. After completing his studies at the National School for Folk Arts in Kotel and at the Academy of Music and Dance Arts in Plovdiv, Valeri organized and worked with Folk Theater Naiden Kirov and Orchestra Horo in Russe, North Bulgaria. He regularly performs with Lyuti Chushki in Washington, D.C., and is a guest performer for many other traditional Bulgarian artists

Varol Saatcıoğlu (gaida, dumbek, vocals) was born in Edirne, Turkey. At the age of five, Varol was accepted into the prestigious Municipal Conservatory of İstanbul, where he studied music theory and piano performance. After immigrating to the United States, he began studying the gaida (Bulgarian bagpipe) under the expert guidance of Georgi Doichev, former principal soloist with the Filip Kutev Bulgarian National Ensemble. Varol currently lives in Washington, DC and performs with a number of ensembles along the East Coast.

 

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