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2015 Homegrown Concerts

Online Archive of Past Homegrown Concerts

All of the materials from the Homegrown Concert Series are available to visitors in the Folklife Reading Room. Selected materials will be made available online as digital versions are available. Scroll down to see available webcasts and event essays for the 2015.

Treasures from the Archive Roadshow: Featuring the Down Hill Strugglers and John Cohen

September 25, 2015 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 10:03:19 and on Library of Congress YouTube

View the oral history Running time 00:53:57 and on Library of Congress YouTube

The Down Hill Strugglers and John Cohen play traditional American music they have learned directly from the amazing collections at the American Folklife Center (AFC) at the Library of Congress.  From Alan Lomax's pioneering field recordings of the 1930s and 1940s to newly acquired collections, AFC has inspired generations of American musicians.

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John Cohen playing a banjo
John Cohen
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John Cohen (b. 1932) is a founding member of the New Lost City Ramblers as well as a fieldworker, photographer and filmmaker. Some of his best known images document old-time musicians of Appalachia, Abstract Expressionist painters, Beat Generation writers, young Bob Dylan's arrival in New York, and the rural music and weaving traditions of highland Peru.  The title of Cohen's 1962 film, High Lonesome Sound, has become synonymous with the rural Appalachian music that he has documented in films, photographs and audio recordings. Cohen has been one of the most important "discoverers" of traditional Appalachian musicians and singers, meeting and recording Dillard Chandler, Roscoe Holcomb, and many banjo players, most notably on the album High Atmosphere. Beginning in 1958, his band the New Lost City Ramblers brought the diverse sounds of rural American string band music to audiences throughout the United States and the world for 50 years.  John Cohen’s collections of sound recordings, photographs, and film are part of the AFC archive.

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The Down Hill Strugglers: three men with instruments
The Down Hill Strugglers
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The Down Hill Strugglers is an old time string band based in Brooklyn, NY. They have released an album on Smithsonian Folkways Recordings and are featured on the soundtrack to the Coen Brothers film, "Inside Llewyn Davis" produced by T-Bone Burnett. The Down Hill Strugglers band formed while hanging out at the home of their mutual friend Peter Stampfel of the Holy Modal Rounders, where they also met friend and mentor John Cohen of the New Lost City Ramblers. By carrying the music of the old rural America forward with verve and creativity, The Down Hill Strugglers are extending the legacy of the New Lost City Ramblers by bringing archaic sounds into the present.


 

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Sones de México Ensemble performingg
Sones de México Ensemble
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Sones de México Ensemble: Mexican American Music & Dance from Chicago

September 16, 2015 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 01:09:08

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Sones de México Ensemble is a Mexican folk musical group that specializes in Mexican son, a genre encompassing the roots of mariachi music and other regional styles, including huapango, gustos, chilenas, son jarocho, and more. The ensemble was formed in Chicago in 1994 and soon incorporated as a non-profit organization to keep the tradition of Mexican ‘son’ alive in its many regional forms.  The current members of the ensemble are Juan Díes, Lorena Íñiguez, Juan Rivera, Zacbé Pichardo, Gonzalo Córdova, and Javier Saume-Mazzei.

As performers and recording artists, members of the ensemble have developed and popularized many original arrangements of Mexican traditional tunes. The group’s original work has included cross-culturally experimental projects with symphonic, Irish, Chinese, folk, blues, country & western, jazz, and rock musicians, though never abandoning its roots in Mexican son.

The group has released six CDs: ¡Que Florezca! (Let it Bloom); Fandango on 18th Street; the GRAMMY™ and Latin GRAMMY™ nominated  Esta Tierra Es Tuya (This Land is Your Land); Fiesta Mexicana (a children’s album); ¡Viva la Revolución!; and 13 B’ak’tun.

Photo: Elizabeth Fraiberg

 

1:00-2:00 p.m. Lecture: "Corridos: The Story of a Mexican Ballad Tradition about Outlaws and Heroes" (Free and open to the public)

2:30-5:00 p.m. Corrido (Tragic Ballad) Songwriting Workshop (Pre-registration required)

September 15, 2015
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast of the lecture Running time 01:05:30

And on Library of Congress YouTube

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Juan Díes
Juan Díes
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Ethnomusicologist Juan Díes presents an illustrated lecture on the Corrido, a 150-year-old Mexican ballad tradition that narrates tragic tales based on true events and honors folk heroes. The lecture is free and open to the public.

After the lecture, registered participants will learn to write a Mexican "corrido" in this free, 2 ½-hour workshop (conducted in Spanish), with Díes and musicians from his GRAMMY™ Nominated Sones de México Ensemble. By the end of this workshop, the group will have written an original song in corrido form. (Attendance at 1 p.m. lecture required for participation in the workshop.

Presented by the American Folklife Center; sponsored in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Spanish translation:

Corridos: Taller de composición de baladas trágicas mexicanas

Aprende a escribir un "corrido" original en esto taller gratuito de 2 ½ -horas (en español) con músicos del grupo Sones de México Ensemble, dos veces nominado a los premios GRAMMY™ y su cofundador y etnomusicólogo Juan Díes. Al finalizar de esto taller cada grupo habrá escrito una canción original en el estilo del corrido. El corrido es una tradición musical mexicana de mas de 150 años: un género de balada trágica que cuenta historias basadas en hechos y personajes heroicos de la vida real. Aprende sobre la historia de este género y sobre las reglas poéticas para escribir la letra de estas interesantes canciones. Entérate cómo entrar al Gran Concurso de Corridos de 2015 para ganar premios en efectivo. Este taller esta abierto a adultos, niños y familias. Este programa está patrocinado por un subsidio federal del Fondo Nacional Para las Artes.

 

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Dave Reed and Hugh Campbell.
Dave Reed and Hugh Campbell , photo by Edwin Remsberg.
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The Legacy of Ola Belle Reed: Featuring David Reed, Hugh Campbell, and Other Friends and Family

September 9, 2015 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the The Legacy of Ola Belle Reed: Concert webcast

And on Library of Congress YouTube

View the webcast of the interview and discussion of Ola Belle Reed's legacy with Cliff Murphy, Henry Glassie, Dave Reed, Hugh Campbell, Danny Paisley, Ryan Paisley, Michael Paisley, and T.J. Lundy. Running time 58 minutes.

And on Library of Congress YouTube

In celebration of the legacy of the pioneering old-time musician Ola Belle Reed (1916-2002), Reed’s son Dave Reed, her nephew Hugh Campbell, and members of the acclaimed bluegrass band Danny Paisley and Southern Grass gather to perform bluegrass and gospel songs of their Appalachian heritage.

Ola Belle Reed, an important singer, guitarist, banjo player, and songwriter, was born in North Carolina. Her family followed many other migrants from the southern Appalachians to the Pennsylvania-Maryland border area during the Great Depression, where they transformed the local culture; even today, the region is known for bluegrass music. Dave Reed and Hugh Campbell (above right), photo by Edwin Remsberg. 

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Publication cover showing a photo of Ola Belle Reed playing the guitar.
Cover: Ola Belle Reed and Southern Mountain Music on the Mason-Dixon Line
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Reed was a big part of this transformation, playing with some of the first southern-style string bands organized in the area during the 1930s. Her brother Alex Campbell joined her after his return from World War II, and they became central to the musical traditions of the area. They founded the popular band Alex & Ola Belle and the New River Boys and Girls, and also operated Campbell’s Corner, a general store in Oxford, Pennsylvania, which was equipped with a performance stage and a remote broadcasting booth, allowing them to reach large audiences.

In 1966, folklorist Henry Glassie, then based in Philadelphia, encountered Ola Belle in Oxford. Over the next two years, Glassie recorded the deep repertoire of Ola Belle Reed – folk ballads, minstrel songs, country standards, and originals such as "I've Endured," penned by Ola Belle herself. Glassie also chronicled the remarkable story of the pre-war migration of communities from the Blue Ridge Mountains toward the Mason-Dixon Line. Copies of Henry Glassie's Ola Belle Reed collections, as well as earlier recordings of Reed, are part of the AFC archive. Some four decades later, Maryland state folklorist Clifford Murphy struck out to discover if this rich musical tradition still existed in small Maryland, Delaware, and Pennsylvania towns, and began making audio recordings to document the descendants of Ola Belle’s musical legacy, including the musicians performing in this concert.

 

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Clockwise from upper left: Edward Poullard, Lawrence Ardoin, Rusty Metoyer, Sean Ardoin, and Andre Thierry.
Clockwise from upper left: Edward Poullard, Lawrence Ardoin, Rusty Metoyer, Sean Ardoin, and Andre Thierry.
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Creole United: African American Creole Music from Louisiana

July 29, 2015 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 01:10:30

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Creole United is a group representing three generations of Louisiana Creole music culture. The members consider themselves the keepers of the music culture of the Southwest Louisiana Creoles. This mix of musical styles originated among the French-speaking African Americans of the lower Mississippi, with influences of Cajun, African, and Spanish music. Sean Ardoin and Andre Thierry, who originated and manage the collaboration, believe that by using classic Creole music styles of the past, and being careful to include Creole French, they can create new Creole standards. All the musicians perform in bands of their own as well as in Creole United, and the current group includes several bandleaders.  As the group explains, “Creole United is not just a band, it's a movement!” The goal is to bring together active, retired, and upcoming Creole musicians of both traditional and emerging styles to collaborate on recording projects and concerts.  In 2013, Creole United completed a CD, whose title, Non Jamais Fait,  means "never been done," because a collaboration of this kind has never been done before. The current group includes Edward Poullard, Lawrence Ardoin, Rusty Metoyer, Sean Ardoin, and Andre Thierry.

 

Sharp’s Appalachian Harvest with Jeff Davis and Brian Peters

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Jeff Davis and Brian Peters
Jeff Davis and Brian Peters
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July 13, 2015, 7:00 to 9:00 PM
Mumford Room, Sixth floor
James Madison Building

View the webcast Running time 01:47:36

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Sharp’s Appalachian Harvest is a special multimedia folk music presentation performed and researched by English folk musician Brian Peters and American old-time musician Jeff Davis. Their presentation is devoted to the astounding collection of songs and music made by English collectors Cecil Sharp and Maud Karpeles in the Southern Appalachians over three summers in 1916, 1917 and 1918, one of the most extensive folk song collections ever made.

Brian Peters is a leading solo performer of English traditional songs and music who frequently tours in the United States. He has taught at song schools including The Swannanoa Gathering and The Augusta Heritage Center, both in the Appalachians, and played many festivals and concerts.  He’s also gaining a reputation as a researcher of song history. Jeff Davis was once a protégé of both Mike Seeger and Frank Warner, both collectors as well as musicians. He is a banjo player, fiddler, and singer with a rare authenticity gained from personal contact with old time musicians. In their presentation, they perform some of the brightest gems from Sharp’s harvest, including old ballads, dance tunes, children’s songs and gospel. They give readings from Sharp’s diaries describing vividly the hardships and triumphs of song collecting, and show his evocative photographs of the singers and of mountain life. Photo: Left to right, Jeff Davis and Brian Peters

This concert is presented with the generous support of the Folklore Society of Greater Washington.

 

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A couple dancing with musicians in the background.
Marinera Viva!!!
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Peruvian Marinera Dance with Marinera Viva!!!

June 30, 2015 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 01:07:52

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Marinera Viva!!! showcases a different way of living, feeling, and dancing the marinera—often called the national dance of Peru. The marinera originated on the Peruvian coast and was named "marinera" in 1879 to honor the Peruvian Navy during the War of the Pacific. The music has Spanish, Moorish, Andean, and Gypsy rhythmic influences while the dance includes Spanish, Incan, and African elements and takes the form of a stylized courtship using handkerchiefs.  The show displays every element of the dance, from the skirts and ponchos, to the intricate steps and overall romance.  Singer Julie Freundt, a diva of Peruvian criollo music, together with well-known virtuoso musicians will share the stage with national champion dancers of the marinera norteña and marinera limeña styles. Marinera Viva!!! is presented in collaboration with the 2015 Smithsonian Folklife Festival program, Perú: Pachamama.External link

 

Ara Dinkjian and Zulal: Traditional Armenian Music and Song

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Ara Dinkjian holding an oud
Ara Dinkjian
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May 28, 2015 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 01:02:08

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Ara Dinkjian is an American born artist who grew up with traditional Armenian music. His earliest professional musical experience was accompanying his father Onnik Dinkjian, a renowned Armenian folk and liturgical singer. Ara learned several western and eastern instruments (piano, guitar, dumbeg, clarinet) and in 1980 graduated from the Hartt College of Music, earning the country’s first and only special degree in the instrument for which he has become most well-known, the oud. For over forty years, he served as organist in the Armenian Apostolic Church. Throughout his musical life, Ara has continued to develop his highly personal compositional style which blends his eastern and western roots. In 1985, to help realize these compositions and musical concepts, Ara formed his instrumental quartet, Night Ark, which recorded four CDs for RCA/BMG and Universal/PolyGram. Night Ark’s recordings and concert tours were highly influential for musicians and music lovers throughout the world because they demonstrated how music can be progressive and creative while still retaining the dignity and soul of one’s culture.

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Zulal trio
Zulal
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In Armenian, Zulal means "clear water." Zulal, the New York-based a cappella trio, takes Armenia’s village folk melodies and weaves intricate arrangements that pay tribute to the rural roots of the music while introducing contemporary lyricism and energy. Zulal’s singers, Teni Apelian, Yeraz Markarian and Anaïs Tekerian have been singing together since 2002. The trio celebrates the trials and joys of old Armenian village life: Budding romances in elevated gardens, the disappointments of hapless suitors, secret messages placed upon the western winds, the moonlit faces of shepherd boys and their brides... These are the searing impressions of the past that come to life in Zulal's arrangements, reminders of a simpler past, tokens of comfort in the complex, modern world. The group has two albums, Zulal (2004), and Notes to a Crane (2012).

This concert is co-sponsored with the Library of Congress African Middle East Division.

 


Bing Xia: Traditional Chinese Guzheng Music

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Bing Xia playing the guzheng.
Bing Xia
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May 21, 2015 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast

Bing Xia, Director of the Washington Guzheng Society, is an accomplished soloist and teacher of the Chinese guzheng. The guzheng, or zheng, is a plucked zither that is thought to be about 2500 years old (“gu” means “ancient” and has been added to the name zheng to indicate the great age of the zheng). The instrument changed over time, as the earliest guzheng had twelve strings, while the modern instrument has twenty-one to twenty-five strings. The guzheng is the ancestor of all Asian long zithers. The instrument is traditionally tuned to a pentatonic scale, though other scales are sometimes used.

Born in China, Bing Xia began studying the guzheng at the age of eight and studied music and guzheng at Nanjing Normal University and the Shanghai Conservatory of Music. After moving to Maryland, Bing Xia became a featured performer in the "Music in the Age of Confucius" program presented by the Smithsonian Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in the summer of 2000, and in the "Asian Song Festival" at the Kennedy Center in May, 2003. Her performances have been broadcast by both NPR and Voice of America nationwide. She has performed as a soloist for many concerts and special events throughout the Washington DC metropolitan area, including the first Chinese Cultural Festival and the Washington Millennium Celebration in 2000, the Kennedy Center, the DC City Council, the Department of Energy, the IMF, the FCC, the FDA, the Smithsonian Institution, the University of Maryland, the Strathmore Music Center, the Export-Import Bank of the United States, the Secret Service, George Mason University, and the Black Rock Performing Arts Center. She was a featured performer in a concert held by the Embassy of the People's Republic of China for vice premier Qian Qichen and Secretary of State Colin Powell. She has also performed in Richmond, Virginia; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Bangor,  Maine.

The Sherman Holmes Project with Brooks Long and Phil Wiggins

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Sherman Holmes, Phil Wiggins, and Brooks Long.
Clockwise from the left: Sherman Holmes, Phil Wiggins, and Brooks Long. Photo of Sherman Holmes by Edwin Remsberg, 2014.
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April 15, 2015 at noon
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 00:59:00

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Wendell and Sherman Holmes were born and raised in Christchurch, Virginia, about fifty miles east of Richmond, where the Rappahannock empties into the Chesapeake Bay. They grew up playing the same mixture of music they draw from today: gospel, soul, R&B, country, and blues. In the 1960s, Sherman moved to New York City, where Wendell joined him to play with a variety of bands. In the 1970s, Wendell met and performed with drummer Willie "Popsy" Dixon, who was also a native Virginian.  The brothers and Popsy formed the Holmes Brothers band. The group performed to national, and later international, audiences and recorded with stars such as Van Morrison, Peter Gabriel, Odetta, Phoebe Snow, Willie Nelson, Freddie Roulette, and Rosanne Cash. Their latest album, Brotherhood, was released in 2014.  In 2014 the group received the prestigious National Heritage Fellowship Award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Through their long performing career with Popsy, the brothers came to call him a "brother in spirit."

In late 2013, Wendell began working with a young Baltimore rock'n'soul musician named Brooks Long, and for the past year, Wendell has been formally mentoring Brooks with the assistance of a Maryland Traditions Apprenticeship Award. The Award is a program of the Maryland State Arts Council’s folklife program, and is designed to honor master traditional artists, while enabling them to pass their skills on to the next generation. The result has been transformative, enabling Brooks to move beyond recordings and into a creative, collaborative space with one of R&B’s wisest and talented singers, songwriters, and instrumentalists. Maryland Traditions celebrated the Holmes Brothers’ National Heritage Fellowship with a concert in December  2014, and Wendell invited Brooks Long to join them for the performance. This show proved to be both Wendell Holmes and Popsy Dixon’s final stage performance;  Wendell is no longer performing for health reasons and Popsy Dixon passed away on January 9, 2015.  Wendell and Brooks’s apprenticeship was documented in a feature broadcast of WYPR’s “The Signal” in January  2015.

In this concert Sherman Holmes and Brooks Long are joined by the great blues harmonica player Phil Wiggins.  Wiggins, a native of Washington, DC, spent most of his career playing as a duo with the late John Cephas.  Besides being a renowned harmonica player, he is also a gifted songwriter and singer whose material helped to define the duo’s sound. As a harmonica-guitar duo, Cephas & Wiggins were uniquely able to exemplify the synthesis of African and European elements which co-exist in the blues.  Since the death of John Cephas, Phil Wiggins has continued to play, partnering with Corey Harris, Rick Franklin, Jerron Paxton, and other prominent musicians.

Photo:  Clockwise from the left, Sherman Holmes, Phil Wiggins, and Brooks Long.  Photo of Sherman Holmes by Edwin Remsberg.

Lubana Al Quntar & Kenan Adnawi: Traditional Music and Song from Syria

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Lubana Al Quntar
Lubana Al Quntar
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March 25, 2015 at noon
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 00:54:40

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Lubana Al Quntar comes from a Syrian family that is deeply rooted in classical Arabic music. She related to the singer and actress Amal Al Atrash (known by her stage name, Asmahan) and her brother is the renowned composer and singer Farid Al Atrash. These connections influenced her musical path and played an important role in her decision to seek a career as a professional singer. Born in Syria, she began singing at an early age and had an unusual gift for singing challenging sung poetry from childhood. Today Lubana performs classical Arabic pieces with a melancholy flavor, characteristic for this type of music. Her expressive voice allows her to add luster and richness to the singing styles of traditional Arabic Maqam.

In addition to traditional Arabic song, Lubana studied opera and became the first Syrian opera singer to attain international recognition, as she appeared in concerts throughout Europe. She returned to Syria to head the Department of Opera Singing and launched the Department of Classical Arabic Singing at the Syrian National Conservatory. This was a ground-breaking event because, for the first time, students could study both operatic and traditional singing at an accredited institution. She established the Arabic Music Singing Ensemble that performed across the Middle East. She came to the United States in 2012 and has since performed in numerous venues, including the Kennedy Center.

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Kenan Adnawi playing the oud
Kenan Adnawi
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Kenan Adnawi joined the High Music Institute in Damascus, Syria in 2003 where he studied oud with Azerbaijani expert Askar Ali Akbar and graduated in 2008. Adnawi has since accompanied Marcel Khalife in his Al-Mayadeen Ensemble in Morocco, United Arab Emirates, Austria, and Lebanon, and has played with the Qatar Philharmonic, under the direction of world renowned Maestro Lorin Maazel, for its inaugural concert in October 2008. He toured with the Qatar Philharmonic in 2009, and performed at the Kennedy Center in Washington DC, Theater des Champs-Elysees in Paris, La Scala in Milan, and Teatro Massimo in Palermo where he played the Arabian Concerto composed by Marcel Khalife. In 2009, he won first place in the International Oud Competition in Beirut, Lebanon. Adnawi is currently enrolled in an MA program in Contemporary Music at the New England Conservatory.

 

The Royal Harmonizers

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The Royal Harmonizers performing in a church
The Royal Harmonizers
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March 18, 2015 at noon
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 00:59:08

And on Library of Congress YouTube

A few years ago several men who were dedicated to their Religious faith came together with a desire -- a desire of expressing their faith in Christ to their community using music as their medium. Mr. Berkley Bell was instrumental in  organizing the original group called "The Royal Harmonizers." The members of that group were Berkley Bell, Fuller Ming, Victor Chance, William Ridgley and James Ridgley. These men through hard work, determination, and prayer worked on  perfecting their craft so that all who heard their songs would know and understand their love of Christ.  They also hoped that anyone who heard them sing would be filled in their hearts and soul with  Holy Spirit as  each member of this Gospel Group was. This desire continues to be the  driving force with this group and the Holy Spirit continues to be their fuel. 

The Royal Harmonizers have been singing for 59 years, Although the faces have changed the Spirit of the lord still works in and through this group. the current members of the group are Lionel Owens, Tony Layton, Terry Ridgley and William Ridgley (who is the last original member of the group). The other original members have found their way home and are singing in our Lord and Saviors Holy Heavenly Choir.  

 

Andrea Hoag & Loretta Kelley | Swedish and Norwegian Fiddling

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Andrea Hoag holding a violin
Andrea Hoag
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February 18, 2015 at noon
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

A Tour of Norwegian and Swedish Fiddle Styles with Andrea Hoag (Violin) and Loretta Kelley (Violin & Hardingfele/Hardanger Fiddle)

View the webcast Running time 01:02:27

And on Library of Congress YouTube

Andrea Hoag and Loretta Kelley are among the United States’ foremost performers of Scandinavian traditional music. Each of them has spent years studying with tradition-bearers in Scandinavia, and honing their own techniques at home. They have many acclaimed recordings, including Hambo in the Snow (with Charlie Pilzer), which was nominated for a 2007 GRAMMY Award as Best Traditional World Music Album. 

As the recipient of a fellowship from the Skandia Music Foundation, Andrea Hoag studied at Sweden’s respected Malungs Folkhögskola, becoming the first non-Swede to earn the certificate in Folk Violin Pedagogy, in 1984. Her program included in-depth study with elder tradition-bearers Pekkos Gustaf and Nils Agenmark, masters of the complex, demanding Bingsjö fiddling dialect; Leif Göras and Jonny Soling of Orsa; singers Maria, Britta, and Anna Röjås of Boda; Kalle Almlöf and Ville Toors of Malung; and Påhl Olle of Östbjörka, who is acknowledged as the foremost creator of the Swedish close-harmony playing style. Since that time, Andrea has taken every opportunity to work with several generations of fiddlers from many parts of Sweden, and has been called “like Pekkos Gustaf come to life again” for her faithfulness to the elder generation’s style. Hoag has long been acknowledged as a stateside expert of Swedish fiddle tradition. Her teaching credentials include the Festival of American Fiddle Tunes, Ashokan Fiddle & Dance Weeks, the Swannanoa Gathering, and the Berklee College of Music. She was director of the Seattle Skandia Spelmanslag for seven years, and led the group on an acclaimed performing tour to Sweden.  She has been featured on NPR’s All Things Considered and Performance Today, at the Kennedy Center and Library of Congress, and at numerous venues around the U.S., Sweden, and beyond. With a particular interest in in-depth musical conversations, She has collaborated across genres with many respected artists, from blues harmonica virtuoso Phil Wiggins to Kathak dancer Brinda Guha.

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Loretta Kelley holding a hardingfele
Loretta Kelley
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Since 1979 Loretta Kelley has made over twenty five trips to Norway to study with master hardingfele players. In 1979, while attending the Folk High School in Rauland in West Telemark, she studied privately for six months with Arne Øygarden, the leader of the Falkeriset Spelemannslag (fiddler's group) and a bearer of West Telemark tradition. In 1993 she  received a grant from the American-Scandinavian Foundation to study for six weeks with the Løndal-Fykerud tradition bearer Einar Løndal of Tuddal, Telemark, and in 2001 she spent eight weeks in Tinn, Telemark, studying the Dahle tradition of hardingfele playing with the master fiddler Olav Øyaland, sponsored by a grant from the Norway-America Association. In addition she has studied intensively with the important tradition bearers Hauk and Knut Buen in Telemark, Jens A. Myro in Hallingdal, and Olav Jørgen Hegge of Øystre Slidre, Valdres, as well as made numerous study visits with Gunnar Dahle, Leif Rygg, Hallvard Bjørgum, Knut Myrann, and many others. In cooperation with Knut Buen, the Telemark virtuoso hardingfele player, Loretta has authored a booklet, "Knut Buen's Telemarkspel," of transcriptions of the tunes from Buen's teaching cassette. She has contributed two chapters to books published in Norway, "Hardingfela i Amerika" in Hardingfela, Det norske nasjonalinstrumentet by Halvard Kaasa and Astrid Versto (Grøndahl Dreyer, 1997), and "Feleambassadøren Knut Buen", in Mellom hjertets slag og felas drag, Festskrift til Knut Buen (ed. Eivind Blikstad, Telemarksavisa, 1998). She has also written articles in print and online, and served as consultant and wrote extensive liner notes for an anthology of Knut Buen's playing, As Quick as Fire, published on CD by Rounder Records in 1996.

 

The Western Flyers: Classic Western swing, Hot jazz & Swing standards, toe tapping Cowboy songs and electrifying Old-time fiddle tunes.

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The Western Flyers
Western Flyers
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February 5, 2015 at noon
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 00:59:34

And on Library of Congress YouTube

After ten years of touring with one of the highlights of last year’s Homegrown series, The Quebe Sisters Band (as fiddle/vocal teacher, musical arranger and guitarist), Joey McKenzie has a new trio with Katie Glassman and Gavin Kelso, The Western Flyers.  Their swinging rhythm section, brisk fiddling, and sensitive singing is perfect for the Library’s Whittall Pavilion.  With versatility and deep musicianship, McKenzie has performed in forty-five U.S. states as well as Canada, Europe, Russia and South America. In addition to his signature arch-top rhythm guitar and his skill at arranging music, Joey is also a three-time World Champion Fiddler and sought-after instructor.  Glassman is a full-time performer and music teacher in Denver, Colorado. She is a two-time National Fiddle Champion and is an integral part of Colorado's thriving roots music scene. Kelso is gifted with a powerful dexterity on the bass and a lively musical imagination.

 

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