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2016 Homegrown Concerts

Online Archive of Past Homegrown Concerts

All of the materials from the Homegrown Concert Series are available to visitors in the Folklife Reading Room. Selected materials will be made available online as digital versions are available. Scroll down to see available webcasts and event essays.

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Dale Ann Bradley with a guitar.
Dale Ann Bradley
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The Dale Ann Bradley Band: A Bluegrass Concert Celebrating the Library’s Collections from Kentucky

December 7, 2016
Coolidge Auditorium
Thomas Jefferson Building
8:00 PM

View the webcast Running time 01:32:06

Also on Library of Congress YouTube

Dale Ann Bradley was born and raised in the coal fields of Kentucky. She fell in love with bluegrass music as an early teen and was determined to pursue her dreams.  She first played with a regional band called Backporch Grass. After being contracted to perform at the Renfro Valley Barndance in Renfro Valley, Kentucky, she became part of the leading Bluegrass band  The New Coon Creek Girls, and began recording and traveling extensively. In 1997, she began leading the “Dale Ann Bradley Band,” with whom she has recorded seven albums. Dale Ann writes songs about her upbringing, combining many genres of music, including country and gospel. She has received the International Bluegrass Music Award for female vocalist five times, the Society for the Preservation of Bluegrass Music of America award for female vocalist twice, and many other awards for collaborations. Her most recent album, which she produced, is entitled Pocket Full of Keys. It was nominated for a Grammy Award in 2016 for Best Bluegrass Album.

Greg Blaylock was born and raised in Dickson, Tennessee, and started playing music around 9 years old. His grandfather was Billy Powers, who played with Flatt and Scruggs in the 1960s and was known as the singing bus driver. Billy taught Greg to play guitar, dobro, and banjo. Greg and Billy played contests all over the country and won many state championships. At the age of 17, Greg went on a tour with the Southern Arts Federation and met Dale Ann Bradley for the first time. He has since played in several bands in addition to hers.

Scott Powers’s love ofmusic started at an early age, as his family would always gather and sing and play. He learned to play the guitar at 12 and later took up the mandolin. He has traveled with several different bands and played with a several musical icons. When he’s not on the road he continues to perform for his church.

Tim Dishman wasborn in Valparaiso, Indiana, with family roots in Alabama and West Virginia. He grew up playing in his family’s gospel band. He turned to bluegrass at thirteen when he received his first guitar and his first Tony Rice album. He started his bluegrass career playing guitar with The Porter County Bluegrass Band. He has also played with The Kenny Stone Unit, Special Consensus, and the Tina Adair Band. He played bass on Alan Jackson’s “The Bluegrass Album.”

Artemio Posadas: Mexican music and dance from California
National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellow, 2016 Bess Lomas Hawes award recipient

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Artemio Posadas with a harp.
Artemio Posadas
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September 28, 2016 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 00:58:22

Also on Library of Congress YouTube

Artemio Posadas is a musician, dancer, teacher, and tireless cultural organizer, and this year’s Bess Lomax Hawes National Heritage Fellow for his commitment to the Mexican tradition of son huasteco.

The son of a traditional violinist, he was born in 1948 and raised in the northeastern Mexican state of San Luis Potosí, in the cultural region known as La Huasteca. As a youth, Posadas became fascinated with the region’s music known as son huasteco, with its singing style embellished with falsetto breaks and a rich practice of poetic, instrumental, and dance improvisation. He learned the music’s three instruments—huapanguera (large rhythm guitar), jarana (small guitar), and violin—as well as traditional repertoire and dance style. He sought out the region’s best groups as teachers and performed with the Grupo de la Universidad de San Luis Potosí. He worked with the late Beno Liberman to record regional sones for the milestone Antología del Son Mexicano. After touring to the San Francisco Bay area in 1973, he was invited back in 1974 to give workshops to local music and dance enthusiasts in the Mexican-American community. He resettled in the Bay Area in 1979 and later became a United States citizen.  

In northern California, he performed with local musicians and since 1990 has taught the son huasteco (along with the son jarocho and other regional forms of son) at Richmond’s East Bay Center for the Performing Arts, helping to anchor the growth and understanding of authentic son in the greater San Francisco Bay Area. During this time, Posadas served as master teacher under apprenticeship grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. He accompanied several ballet folklórico companies, including the prominent Los Lupeños de San José, and consulted with them on traditional son huasteco music and dance styles. A major contribution to the burgeoning practice of traditional Mexican music in California was his insistence on keeping the son huasteco part of social life as well as staged performance. He rented halls, recruited musicians, and organized fandango events that invited people to eat, drink, and perform son huasteco as a social experience. Musician, anthropologist, and Posadas disciple Russell Rodriguez sums up Posadas’s contributions: “The arrival of Artemio Posadas to the Bay Area of California was a blessing. He modeled how traditional arts, such as the dance, poetry, and music of the son mexicano, are significant in our daily lives.”

Posadas produced two recordings of the renowned trío huasteco Los Camperos de Valles. One of these recordings, El Ave de Mi Soñar, featuring Artemio’s original poetry, was released in 2005 by Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, and one track of which appeared in the movie A Better Life. In 2005 and 2009, he participated as a dancer with Los Camperos de Valles in the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. In 2014, he was featured in the Homegrown concert series as a member of Son Jarocho Master Musicians -- view a webcast of that concert here 

In collaboration with the Hispanic Division and the Hispanic Cultural Society of the Library of Congress to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month.

Gabriel Muñoz and Melodias Borinqueñas: Puerto Rican Folk Music from New Jersey

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Gabriel Muñoz with his cuatro
Gabriel Muñoz
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September 22, 2016 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the concert webcast Running time 01:06:44

Also available on Library of Congress YouTube.

View the oral history with Gabriel Muñoz and Dan Sheehey
Running time 00:54:12

Also available on Library of Congress YouTube

Gabriel Muñoz was born in Puerto Rico in 1976. When he was 2, his family moved to New Jersey, where he grew up and still resides. He was introduced to the cuatro—a traditional Puerto Rican musical instrument similar to the mandolin—at the age of 14. Gabriel fell in love with the instrument’s sound, and asked his father to purchase one for his upcoming birthday. So on his 15th birthday, he received his first cuatro as a gift, which he says changed his life forever. He then began honing his skills on the instrument through constant practice and immersing himself in the cuatro and in Puerto Rican music. He sought advice and wisdom from other cuatro players, including the well known master Alvin Medina, in order to perfect his craft. Approximately 6 years ago he co-founded the musical ensemble Melodias Borinqueñas (Melodies from Puerto Rico), who will be performing at this concert. The band features Gabriel Muñoz on cuatro, Anibal Ortiz on guitar, Mariano Medina on congas, Ivan Rodriguez on bongos, Ana Ortiz on guiro, and Hector Hernandez on vocals. Using these unique sounds, they hope to introduce Puerto Rican folk music to many people around the world, and also to provide a nostalgic experience to Puerto Ricans living away from their homeland. 

Yvette Landry Trio: Cajun Music and Louisiana Honky-Tonk

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Yvette Landry
Yvette Landry. Photo by Amos Perrine.
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September 7, 2016 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor

Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 01:04:26

Also on Libary of Congress YouTube

View the oral history interview Running time 00:49:43

Also on Library of Congress YouTube

Yvette Landry grew up in Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, not far from the levees of the Atchafalaya Basin, North America’s largest swampland. It was in and around that swamp where she learned to hunt, fish, ride horses, dance, understand French, and tell stories. After earning a master’s degree in education and developing a successful teaching career, she began telling stories through song. She is now a Grammy-nominated, award-winning vocalist, multi-instrumentalist, and songwriter. Her debut award-winning album titled Should Have Known was released in 2010. Yvette has traveled the world and played countless cultural festivals, from the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival to the GrassRoots Festival of Music and Dance in New York. She toured Russia where she served as Cultural Ambassador on behalf of the Library of Congress, performing at the Festival of Traditional American Music. Elected as Governor to the Memphis Chapter of the Recording Academy, she is a member of The Lafayette Rhythm Devils, Balfa Toujours, and several other Cajun bands. When not playing music, Yvette stays busy as a mother, private homeschool teacher, an adjunct professor at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, a noted children’s author and a sign language interpreter.

Yvette will be joined by Richard Comeaux on pedal steel and Beau Thomas on fiddle.

Rahim AlHaj Trio: Middle Eastern Music from New Mexico — Rahim AlHaj: Iraqi oud, Sourena Sefati: Iranian santur, Issa Malluf: Palestinian percussion

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Rahim AlHaj holding an oud
Rahim AlHaj
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July 28, 2016 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor

Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 01:07:55

Also on Library of Congress YouTube

View the interview with Daniel Sheehy and Rahim AlHaj
Running time 01:24:05

Also on Library of Congress YouTube

Rahim AlHaj (oud) was born in Baghdad, Iraq and began playing the oud (Arabic lute) at age nine. Early on, it was evident that he had a remarkable talent for playing the oud. He studied under the renowned Munir Bashir and Salim Abdul Kareem, at the Institute of Music in Baghdad, Iraq. He graduated in 1990 with a diploma in composition. He holds a degree in Arabic Literature from Mustunsariya University in Baghdad. In 1991, after the first Gulf War, he was forced to leave Iraq due to his activism against the Saddam Hussein regime and lived for some years in Jordan and Syria. He moved to the US in 2000 as a political refugee and has resided in Albuquerque, New Mexico ever since. Rahim has performed around the globe (including Europe, China, India, and Russia) and is considered one of the finest oud players in the world. He has won many accolades and awards including two Grammy nominations. Rahim has recorded and performed with other master musicians of varied backgrounds and styles including guitarist Bill Frisell, modern accordion innovator Guy Klucevsek, Indian sarod maestro Amjad Ali Khan, and indie rock pioneers REM. He has composed pieces for solo oud, string quartet, symphony orchestra, and beyond. Rahim’s music delicately combines traditional Iraqi maqams with contemporary styling and influence. His compositions evoke the experience of exile from his homeland and of new beginnings in his adopted country. In 2015 Rahim was awarded the National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellowship, the highest honor for traditional arts in the USA.

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Sourena Sefati
Sourena Sefati
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Sourena Sefati (santour) was born in Ramsar, Iran. He started playing santour (hammered dulcimer) at the age of eleven. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Iranian Music from University of Tehran (2002) and his Master’s degree in Iranian Music Performance from Art University of Tehran (2008). He won the award for best composer of Iranian music at Art University in 2006. He was music instructor at Art University and Elmi-Karbordi University in Tehran from 2008 to 2014. Sourena is the author of a book of etudes for santour, has performed in Europe, Asia, and Africa, and was soloist at Iran Broadcasting Symphony Orchestra (2009 to 2014), Iranian Chamber Orchestra (2009), and Mehrnavazan National Orchestra (2011). Sourena moved to the United States in 2014, and teaches Iranian music in Albuquerque.

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Issa Malluf holding a hand drum
Issa Malluf
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Issa Malluf (percussion) is a Palestinian-American native of New Mexico. Originally self-taught, Issa has become a highly skilled and internationally recognized specialist in Middle Eastern, Arabic, and North African percussion. He has performed nationally and internationally at venues as noteworthy as the Kennedy Center, ¡Globalquerque!, the National Folk Festival, the Chicago World Music Festival, and the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. He has recorded and toured with an array of artists including Grammy-nominated oud virtuoso and composer Rahim AlHaj, indie-rock guitarist Peter Buck of R.E.M., Indian sarod master Amjad Ali Khan and Eastern European, Balkan, and Turkish influenced indie-world act A Hawk and a Hacksaw, and many more.

Co-sponsored with the African and Middle Eastern Division of The Library Of Congress.

The Legendary Ingramettes: African American Gospel Music from Virginia

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The Legendary Ingramettes
The Legendary Ingramettes with the late Maggie Ingram (seated)
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July 21, 2016 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 01:04:35

Also on Libary of Congress YouTube

For more than five decades, The Ingramettes have been bringing their music and ministry to congregations in the Tidewater and Piedmont. Their commanding, spirit-filled performances demonstrate the extraordinary depth of talent in American gospel music. The group is one of Virginia’s premier gospel ensembles.

Born July 4, 1930, on Mulholland’s Plantation in Coffee County, Georgia, founder Maggie Ingram (1930-2015) worked in the cotton and tobacco fields with her parents. She began playing the piano and singing at an early age, and developed a great love for the church and the ministry of the Gospel. She formed Sister Maggie Ingram and the Ingramettes, a singing group that became sought after for appearances throughout Florida. In 1961 Maggie moved her family to Richmond, where she worked in the home of Oliver W. Hill, the prominent civil rights attorney who represented the Virginia plaintiffs in the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case. The family joined Love’s Temple Church of God in Christ and began singing in and around the city. With her children, Maggie also began a prison ministry, partnering with the Mount Gilead Baptist Church in the 1970s to institute programs like family day in Virginia prison camps.

The Ingramettes are gospel icons in Richmond and have received numerous awards, including the prestigious Virginia Heritage Award in 2009. Maggie was awarded a doctor of music degree from Virginia Triumphant College and Seminary in 2011. The Virginia Folklife Program’s production of Maggie Ingram and the Ingramettes: Live in Richmond received the Independent Music Awards fan’s choice award for Gospel Album of the Year in 2012.

NOKA: Basque Song and Music from California

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Andréa Bidart, Begoña Echeverria, and Cathy Petrissans
NOKA: Andréa Bidart, Begoña Echeverria, and Cathy Petrissans
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July 6, 2016 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the Webcast Running time 00:59:53

Also on Libary of Congress YouTube

View the Oral History Running time 00:43:39

Also on Library of Congress YouTube

NOKA is a trio composed of Andréa Bidart, Begoña Echeverria, and Cathy Petrissans, the daughters and granddaughters of Basque immigrants who grew up together in Chino, California. They are members of the Chino Basque club and were raised speaking and singing in Basque. In 1997, they formed the singing trio NOKA and have since recorded three CDs and toured internationally. As NOKA, they specialize in songs about Basque culture, gender, and identity. They are particularly interested in songs that use Noka, a familiar form of address historically used in speaking to a girl or woman in whom one had konfiantza or trust. Noka has almost disappeared from everyday speech, but it is still used among some immigrants. By singing in Noka, they hope to bring more awareness to this important aspect of the Basque language and, perhaps, increase its use. Informed by life experiences and academic research, NOKA’s concerts are intended to entertain but also to educate their audiences. All songs are sung in Basque (an endangered language), and as often as possible in Noka (a unique gendered grammatical form of speech). Those who attend this NOKA performance will leave with a catchy tune in their heart and a bit of Basque knowledge in their head.

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Erramun Martikorena and Mikel Markez
Erramun Martikorena and Mikel Markez
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Mikel Markez, a singer from the Basque Country, will join NOKA for this concert. He is a more modern folk singer and songwriter, whose most popular song is "Zure Begiek (Your Eyes)." The poet-singer from Errenteria, Gipuzkoa started singing at 15, has recorded  several albums, and has written songs for various other Basque musicians.

Co-Sponsored by the Smithsonian Folklife Festival


Billy McComiskey with Family and Friends:
Irish Traditional Music and Dance from Maryland

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Billy McComiskey
Billy McComiskey
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June 28, 2016 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 01:02:59

Also on Library of Congress YouTube

View the oral history Running time 01:28:00

Also on Library of Congress YouTube

Billy McComiskey is one of the nation’s leading players of Irish traditional music. He has won the All-Ireland championship on the button accordion, and is a veteran of bands such as The Irish Tradition, The Green Fields of America, and Trian, He is a native of Brooklyn, New York, and learned to play from Sean McGlynn, a master and proponent of the East Galway style that now characterizes the playing of many of the country’s finest Irish accordion players. He moved to the Washington, D.C. area in the mid-1970s, and eventually settled in Baltimore. In 1976, his band The Irish Tradition played at the party celebrating the creation of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. For AFC’s 40th Anniversary, Billy will perform with his children, Patrick, Sean, and Michael, who are now themselves among the leading traditional Irish musicians in our region. They will be joined by other family and friends for a unique concert of jigs, reels, airs, and other traditional music from the strong Irish American community of the Washington DC and Baltimore region.

Nakotah LaRance: Native American Hoop Dancing from Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo, New Mexico

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Nakotah LaRance dancing with five hoops.
Nakotah LaRance
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May 18, 2016 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 00:50:58

Also on Libary of Congress YouTube

Nakotah LaRance began dancing as a fancy dancer, at the age of 4. During his travels to Pow Wows, he met a world champion hoop dancer from his tribe, Derrick Davis. Mr. Davis helped Nakotah by making his first set of hoops and teaching him the basics of hoop dancing. Nakotah’s father Steve LaRance took him to the annual World Championship of Hoop Dance, which is sponsored by the prestigious Heard Museum in Phoenix, AZ. During his competitions at this event through the years, Nakotah garnered 3 youth division championship titles and 3 teenage division championship titles.

In 2004 Nakotah was invited to perform on NBC's "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno" as "The Most Interesting Person in Arizona.” This gave him national exposure. He followed that by competing on PAX network's "America's Most Talented Kids," which he won with the highest score in the history of the show. This led to opportunities for acting in TV & film, including Steven Spielberg's Into the West miniseries, for which he won a best new actor award. He has also appeared in HBO's Bury My Heart as Wounded Knee and AMC's Longmire. In 2009 Nakotah received a contract offer to be a principal dancer in the Cirque Du Soleil show Totem. He performed hoop dance as part of the theme of the show: the evolution of man. Nakotah traveled the world performing for Cirque Du Soleil for 3 years, and is still called upon by them for special events, most recently as the principal dancer for the 2015 opening ceremonies of the Pan American Games held in Toronto, Canada.

Since returning to New Mexico, Nakotah has returned to compete in the World Championship of Hoop Dance at the Heard Museum and won the adult division championship title for both 2015 and 2016. He has also been the master instructor for the Pueblo of Pojoaque Youth Hoop Dancers for the past 3 years. In the first year of teaching, Nakotah led his young dancers on a European hoop dance tour and performed with them in France, Italy, and Switzerland at the invitation of U.S. Ambassador Keith Harper. Nakotah has been invited to return to Geneva to perform for the entire diplomatic community at the United Nations as part of the U.S. Independence Day celebrations. Nakotah most recently returned from his debut performance in Japan, which earned him rave reviews and cult status there.

Soumya Chakraverty and Devapriya Nayak: Traditional Hindustani Music from Virginia

May 6, 2016
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 01:06:29

Also on Libary of Congress YouTube

View the oral history webcast Running time 01:47:42

Also on Libary of Congress YouTube

The Sarod is a fretless stringed instrument with a skin head like a banjo and an extended air chamber under the fingerboard. These features give the Sarod a unique and clearly identifiable depth of sound. The Sarod is believed to have its origins in the Afghan Rabab, a smaller stringed, lute-style instrument played while marching or riding into battle. The tabla is the best known classical Indian percussion instrument, consisting of a pair of hand drums capable of a wide variety of sounds.

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Soumya Chakraverty playing the sarod (stringed instrument)
Soumya Chakraverty
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Soumya Chakraverty’s musical training began with lessons on the tabla as a child. He took up playing the sarod when he was eleven under the tutelage of Pt. Samarendranath Sikdar, a senior disciple of the late Pt. Radhika Mohan Maitra of the Shahjahanpur Gharana. For nearly thirty years he has received extensive training in a multitude of north Indian ragas, some of which are very rare. Soumya played frequently on All India Radio Calcutta between 1990 and 1995. While pursuing his education in Australia, he began to collaborate with other forms of world music, and performed live with a flamenco dancer in a production that combined the Gypsy roots of the dance with Latin American percussion, Middle Eastern vocals, and Indian classical instrumental music. For more than a decade, Soumya has been performing throughout the US and neighboring countries. His focus remains on traditional Hindustani instrumental music, and he continues to work with other music genres such Classical Carnatic (south Indian), compositions of Rabindranath and Nazrul, flamenco, jazz, and Latin American percussion.

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Devapriya Nayak playing the tabla (drums)
Devapriya Nayak
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Devapriya Nayak (Debu) was born in West Bengal, India, and began learning tabla at the age of three from his grandfather, Chaudhury Kausalya Nandan, an accomplished tabla player of the Punjab Gharana. Later, Debu became a disciple of Pt. Radhakanta Nandi of the Benares Gharana. In 1981, Debu continued his tabla training in the US from Maestros Ustad Zakir Hussain, Pandit Anindo Chatergee and Pt. Samir Chaterjee. His performance at the Kennedy Center with Gaurav Majumdar earned him wide accolades in Washington music circles. Debu is the Director of the DC Chapter of Chhandayan, a tabla school dedicated to the promotion of tabla and Indian Classical Music. With over 30 years of performance experience, he is a much sought after accompanist on the East Coast in Indian classical music.

Cosponsored with the Library of Congress Asian American Association in celebration of Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month.


Esma Redzepova & Folk Masters: Romani (Gypsy) and Macedonian Music

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Esma Redzepova
Esma Redzepova
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April 20, 2016 at noon
Coolidge Auditorium, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 01:03:19

Also on Libary of Congress YouTube

Esma Redzepova is internationally acclaimed as the “Queen of Romani Songs” and is one of NPR’s “50 Greatest Voices.”  Born in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia, she began her professional career at the age of 13.  She was the first Balkan performer to make Romani music popular with non-Romani audiences on elite concert stages in the early 1960s.  Esma, who sings in over 10 languages, earned the title “Queen of Romani Songs” at the World Festival of Romani Music in India in 1976.  At the Festival of Roma Experiences in Moscow in 2000, Esma was proclaimed Laureate and Roma Singer of the Century.  In 2013 she represented Macedonia in the Eurovision Song Contest. Esma has performed for many heads of state and has toured for more than four decades, giving more than 8,000 concerts in over 30 countries. She has played in plazas, stadiums, and opera houses, for villagers as well as world leaders. Her Ensemble has performed over 400 musical pieces on dozens of recordings, several of which achieved "gold" status in the former Yugoslavia.

In addition to her stage work, Esma is a dedicated humanitarian.  Over the past thirty years she has fostered forty-nine children and educated them in music and career development. She will be accompanied by some of these protégés, including master accordionist and ensemble arranger Simeon Atanasov. During the last decade, Esma has been building a "Home of Humanity and Museum of Romani Music" which includes an archive, theater, recording studio, and an outpatient clinic for underserved populations. Esma has been a major contributor to many advocacy and assistance programs for women and underserved populations, including disabled and Romani refugees from Kosovo. She has received numerous honors, including the Macedonian Order of Merit, and in 2013 she was proclaimed a National Artist of Macedonia.       

Folk Masters include: Simeon Atanasov, accordion; Filip Nunevski, trumpet; Aleksandar Stamenkovski, guitar; Nikola Mitrovikj, bass, and Safet Demirov, drums.

Presented in collaboration with Voice of the Roma and the Center for Traditional Music and Dance

Carmen Agra Deedy and Karla Campillo-Soto:
Lado a Lado (Side by Side): Contemporary Latin American Storytelling

April 7, 2016
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast of the oral history Running time 00:49:04

Also on Libary of Congress YouTube

(this performance was not recorded for webcast)

Carmen Agra Deedy and Karla Campillo-Soto will share their own stories of growing up Cuban and Mexican, respectively, in small-town U.S.A. They will share this narrative stage as friends, and the stories will be presented in the form known in Latin cultures as "sobre mesas," or, stories that are told informally, "over the table."

Note: This program is aimed at general adult audiences and is not recommended for children.

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Carmen Agra Deedy
Carmen Agra Deedy
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Carmen Agra Deedy is best known for her beloved children’s books, which include The Library Dragon, Martina the Beautiful Cockroach and the New York Times Bestseller, 14 Cows for America. An award-winning author and storyteller, Deedy is also an accomplished lecturer, having been a guest speaker for the TED Conference, the Library of Congress, and Columbia University. She is also the host of the four-time Emmy-winning children’s program Love That Book! Deedy spends much of the year traveling across North America and the Caribbean performing for children. They remain, unapologetically, her favorite audiences.

 

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Karla Campillo-Soto
Karla Campillo-Soto
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Born in Mexico in 1973, Karla Campillo-Soto came to the U.S. in her twenties. She became an elementary school teacher, and then a School Improvement Specialist. A traditional storyteller, Karla began telling stories publicly some years ago when an author visiting her school district became enchanted with her narrative style and encouraged her to add her stories to those of other traditional American storytellers. Karla currently lives in Douglas, Arizona with her husband and their two children.


Cheick Hamala Diabate Ensemble

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Cheick Hamala Diabate
Cheick Hamala Diabate
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March 23, 2016
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 01:02:29

Also on Library of Congress YouTube

Cheick Hamala Diabate is a West African historian in the Griot tradition, a sought after performer, lecturer, storyteller and choreographer.  Diabate was born into a griot family in Kita, Mali. In West African tradition, the griot is a male troubadour-historian whose hereditary role is to preserve and share the history, genealogy, and oral traditions of his people, as well as providing advice and practicing diplomacy. As a child, Diabate learned to play the n’goni, a stringed instrument which is the precursor to the American banjo. His knowledge grew to include the history of Mali, passed down in his family for more than 800 years. Though Diabate plays the traditional trio of griot instruments—the n’gonikora (gourd harp lute), and balafon (wooden xylophone)—he also embraces the panoply of sound he discovered in America. Like many American string players, Diabate was intrigued by the similarities between the n’goni and the banjo. Seeking to mesh the two instruments, Diabate collaborated with banjo player Bob Carlin on From Mali to America, which earned a Grammy nomination for Best Traditional World Music Album in 2007.  Cheick Hamala began touring in the U.S. in 1995 and has performed throughout Africa, Europe, Asia and Canada. Recent performances include such notable venues as the 2010 Earth Day Celebration on the Washington Mall, the Smithsonian Institution, the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

The Anchiskhati Ensemble with Ethnomusicologist Dr. John A. Graham

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The Anchiskhati Ensemble with instruments
The Anchiskhati Ensemble
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March 10, 2016
Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor
Thomas Jefferson Building

View the webcast Running time 01:30:53

Also on Libary of Congress YouTube

The Anchiskhati Ensemble (Tbilisi, Georgia) present a program of Easter and Lenten music from the Orthodox paschal cycle in Georgia, introduced by Dr. John A. Graham (Yale University). In addition to unaccompanied polyphonic chants from the Paschal cycle, the performance will include several para-liturgical songs from the folk repertory, accompanied by traditional instruments such as the goatskin bagpipe (chiboni) and a four-string lute (chonguri).

The Anchiskhati Ensemble is the undisputed leader of the widespread contemporary revival of the polyphonic chant of the Orthodox Church in the country of Georgia. Their members also include leading scholars of the history and theory of this globally significant medieval repertory. Georgian Orthodox Chant has been sung since the fourth century, and was an exclusively oral tradition for most of that time. It was saved from extinction by its transcription into European notation at the turn of the last century. Starting in 1988, members of the Anchiskhati Church Choir accessed transcriptions in state archives, and begin to chant in the manner inherited through pre-Soviet oral practice. This achievement paved the way for further advances such as the publication of more than fifteen compact disk recordings of chant as well as a dozen books of chant notation.

Directly following the performance, Dr. John A. Graham (Yale University), author of a forthcoming book on this tradition, will lead a discussion on the theme of oral transmission and improvisational practice, demonstrating how Georgian liturgical polyphony may be based on a distant monophonic chant tradition. 

 

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