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Internships and Fellowships

Display Day 2023

Welcome to the Junior Fellows Program Display Day 2023

The Library of Congress Junior Fellows Program enables emerging professionals (undergraduate, graduate students and recent graduates) to gain career experience by working with analog and digital collections and supporting the services of the world’s largest library. Under the direction of curators and specialists in various divisions, Junior Fellows further Library initiatives and increase access to the institution’s unparalleled collections, programs and resources.

Display Day 2023

The Junior Fellows Program 2023 Display Day took place on July 19 and is presented here in its virtual format.

In 2023, the program’s 49 Junior Fellows participated in internships either remotely or onsite. The cohort came together on Display Day to present their projects and share their contributions to the Library.

The Junior Fellows Program has been a signature program of the Library of Congress since 1991. It is made possible by a gift from the late James Madison Council member Nancy Glanville Jewell through the Glanville Family Foundation and the Knowledge Navigators Trust Fund and by an investment from the Mellon Foundation.

2023 Junior Fellows: Project Videos & Personal Statements

Destiny Abercrumbie, North Carolina Central University

Office of Communications
The Legacy of Daniel A.P. Murray: Mapping the Writings of The Founding Fathers’ Opposition to Slavery

2023 Junior Fellow Destiny Abercrumbie worked with the Office of Communications to create a visual presentation mapping out the writings on the Opinions of the early Presidents, and of the fathers of the Republic, upon slavery and upon African Americans as men and soldiers from the Daniel A.P. Murray Pamphlet Collection. Daniel Alexander Payne Murray worked for the Library of Congress for 52 years and served as the 2nd African American to become an assistant librarian. He gathered books and pamphlets that show the progress of African American culture and history that formed what is today known as the Rare Books & Special Collections Division and the Daniel A.P. Murray Pamphlet Collection. Out of this collection, 184 pamphlets focused on the abolition movement and slavery. The purpose of this project is to highlight the thoughts of the early Presidents’ opinions on the practice of slavery, the use of all justifiable endeavors to loosen the bonds of slavery, and to promote a general agreement of the blessings of freedom.

View: Project Video – Destiny Abercrumbie, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Pheolyn Allen, Pennsylvania State University

National Audio-Visual Conservation Center
American Archive of Public Broadcasting: The Odyssey of Black Studies in Public Broadcasting

2023 Junior Fellow Pheolyn Allen’s curated project, The Odyssey of Black Studies in Public Broadcasting, is an online exhibit to be launched in 2023 on the website of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (https://americanarchive.org/ External) showcasing the history of what we know as Black and Afro-Diasporic Studies in American higher education and public schools. The exhibit examines the radical organizing and acts of political dissent that led to the founding of these programs, the political and theoretical foundations of this field of study, and their influence on a national and global scale, through the lens of public broadcasting programs that feature discussions and addresses of key figures. Tracing this history from the student protests of 1969 at San Francisco State University that led to the founding of the nation’s first ethnic studies program, to the 50th year anniversary of Black Studies’ founding itself, this exhibit aims to give voice to the scholarship of Black life that has had a bold history within public broadcasting.

View: Project Video – Pheolyn Allen, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Mateo Arango, University of Maryland, College Park

Latin American, Caribbean and European Division
Cine Latine: Shaping Latino Representation at the Movies

The Cine Latine: Shaping Latino Representation at the Movies project is the first resource in the Library's history dedicated to Latino films. The Latino Film Research Guide will connect users to moving image collections as part of the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center featuring Latino characters and stories. Latino voices have been historically underrepresented in many forms of media but in recent years there has been a shift to have more diverse stories portrayed in movies. In consultation with the Moving Image Research Center, Mateo Arango and other Junior Fellows worked to survey the Library's collections and curate a chronological filmography and related resources. They prepared  a list of influential Latine filmmakers to be part of the guide, and conducted a series of interviews with emerging and established Latino filmmakers.

The Latino Film Research Guide will contain a chronological list of Latine films and will also be organized thematically into categories like Borderlands, Migration, Identity, Latine Protagonist, Latine Director, etc. This resource will allow researchers and the general public to explore the vast collection of Latine narratives and interrogate the ways in which Latino representation has been shaped through the medium of film. The Interview Series of the Cine Latine project is an opportunity to hear directly from the voices and perspectives of Latine filmmakers today. These 30-40-minute video interviews will provide a more nuanced understanding into the lives of these filmmakers and their thoughts on Latine representation in film. Ultimately, the Latino Film Research Guide will increase accessibility to the underrepresented voices and stories of the Latine community by celebrating the rich cultural history of Latine films.

View: Project Video – Mateo Arango, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Sara Augustin, Emory University

Office of Communications
And a Little (Black) Child Shall Lead Them: The Stories of Black Children in the Daniel A.P. Murray Collection

Daniel A. P. Murray was the second African American librarian to work at the Library of Congress. His collection highlights the important narratives, achievements and depictions of African Americans within history, marking his invaluable influence on the Library of Congress. 2023 Junior Fellow Sara Augustin looked to amplify the presence, involvement and voice of Black children within the collection. Although there are over 300,000 documents in the Daniel A.P. Murray collection, less than one percent of these documents are focused on the experiences of children. Too often, the imprint of a child is far removed from history. Yet, their influence echoes within the voids of their erasure.

Sara Augustin centered two specific documents that offer unique detailing into the experiences of Black children within the 19th and early 20th century: Little Dansie’s One Day at Sabbath School by N.F. Mossell and Zina, The Slave Girl, Or Which The Traitor by A. Thompson. She also wished to display the photographs of unidentified children in order to provide both a verbal and visual homage to the unrecognized stories and faces of Black children within the archives. Through her presentation, one is introduced to the way in which the depiction and representation of Black children serve as an often overlooked, but informative window into the Daniel A.P. Murray Collection.

View: Project Video – Sara Augustin, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Callie Beattie, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Rare Book and Special Collections Division
Artists and Archives: Processing the Archive of Russell Maret

As a 2023 Junior Fellow, Callie Beattie worked on processing the archive of contemporary book artist Russell Maret. Comprised of twenty-nine boxes and over forty different book projects, the archive spans several decades and provides a window into the mind and creative practice of an accomplished letter designer, letterpress printer, author and book artist. Along with her co-Fellow, Callie developed an archival arrangement and knowledge schema that fully honors Maret’s creative process while also considering the needs of future researchers in the collection.

When compared to more traditional archives, artist archives are considered distinct due to the variety of non-traditional materials, as well as the highly personal nature of the materials. The Maret Archive reflects these unique qualities and serves as a standout example of American creativity. Russell Maret is still very active in his practice and is a leading contemporary artist in the field. With this in mind, the archive was arranged chronologically by book project. This arrangement gives each book singular consideration and makes it easier to explore the similarities, differences, and growth across Maret’s practice over the years. The arrangement also provides the most accessible discoverability for researchers of all levels.

Once available, the Maret Archive will pair nicely with the Artist Book and Fine Press Collections within the Rare Book and Special Collection Division, which holds an almost complete run of Maret’s books. Uniting the Maret Archive with these existing book editions will allow researchers to follow the complete creative process, from prints and proofs to final books; an invaluable and unique research experience.

View: Project Video – Callie Beattie, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Kate Bennett, The University of Alabama

Rare Book and Special Collections Division
Artists and Archives

Over the past several decades the Rare Book & Special Collections Division (RBSCD) has built one of the strongest book arts collections in the country. These collections are bolstered by archival collections in book arts that provide significant opportunities for research. Artist archives are deeply connected to the creative process and studio practices of modern and contemporary American artists working in the genre of book arts, and document the nation’s cultural record.

Russell Maret, a New York based letterpress printer, type designer, artist, and author has become a celebrity in the field of book arts in a relatively short time. He was awarded the Rome Prize in Design from the American Academy in Rome in 2009, and has been the recipient of several prestigious artist residencies. His archive offers both researchers and students the opportunity to understand his creative process, from all stages of print and book design, to print production and binding. This is a window into the actual process of book making and typographical design, making the archive a complement to RBSCD’s other archives of printers and typographers, including: Frederic Goudy, Victor Hammer, Bruce Rogers, and Claire Van Vliet.

When it was acquired, the Russell Maret archive was in a variety of non-archival boxes. Kate Bennett and Callie Beattie inspected the Maret collection in depth, and organized it chronologically according to project publication. Items were housed in archival-quality boxes, and at-risk items were separated by acid-free envelopes to protect the rest of the objects. They maintained extensive notes about the organization so that a finding aid can be written and published for the collection, making it useable by library patrons.

View: Project Video – Kate Bennett, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Karla Berrios, University of North Carolina, Wilmington

Center for Learning, Literacy and Engagement/Professional Learning and Outreach Initiatives Office
Culturally Relevant Pedagogy with LC Digital Collections: Exploring the Struggles and Triumphs of African Americans in the Post-Civil War Era (1865-1900)

As a 2023 Junior Fellow, Karla Berrios worked with the Library’s Professional Learning and Outreach Initiatives Office (PLOI) on "Culturally Relevant Pedagogy with LC Digital Collections," a project to develop K-12 teaching materials that support culturally relevant instruction. For this project, Karla focused on creating teaching materials that explore the African American experience in the post-Civil War era using primary sources from various Library of Congress digital collections. She carefully selected primary sources specifically to highlight the struggles and triumphs of African Americans as they navigated the challenges of emancipation, citizenship, and the pursuit of social and economic opportunities during and after Reconstruction (1865-1877). By incorporating these primary source-based learning activities that emphasize African Americans’ perseverance, agency, and achievements, teachers can help students develop a more inclusive understanding of this pivotal period in U.S. history. Additionally, the interactive nature of the suggested activities can help facilitate students’ engagement, critical thinking, and ability to draw connections between historical events and their own lives. Collectively, these teaching materials can also serve as a valuable resource for guiding student discussions of historical topics related to race, equality, and social justice. Karla hopes that sharing this project with the Library’s 225+ partner organizations and more than 14,000 educators through the Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) Teachers Network will help realize the Library’s Of the People: Widening the Path goal of connecting all Americans to a deeper and more enriched understanding of the country’s cultural record.

View: Project Video – Karla Berrios, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Abigail Bingham, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University

Congressional Research Division
9-1-1 Service in Rural & Remote Regions

Abigail Bingham studied with the Congressional Research Service as a summer 2023 Junior Fellow. Her research focused on 911 services in rural and remote regions, and the lack of wireless coverage that could inhibit people’s ability to access 911 services. The research examined how new satellite-connected smartphones could fill coverage gaps, create redundant networks, and enable access to 911 in remote and rural regions—areas that are typically underserved and unserved by telecommunication services. The project focused on specific issues regarding new satellite-enabled smartphones—how they work and how they may connect to 911 centers. Abigail studied wireline and wireless communication networks, satellite communication networks and services, new satellite-enabled smartphones, and handling of 911 phone calls across different networks. As Congress considers new funding (nearly $15 billion) for 911 centers, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has proposed new rules to facilitate satellite-to-cellular coverage to extend coverage in rural regions and improve access to 911. The goal of this research is to explore these new technologies, the benefits and challenges of the technology, and how these emerging satellite/cellular technologies may address rural and remote regions of the country unique communication challenges that persist—including access to 911.

View: Project Video – Abigail Bingham, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Easton Brundage, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Office of the Chief Information Officer
Year of Keyboard Accessibility

The Year of Keyboard Accessibility project was created to raise awareness of the needs of individuals with disabilities. It is a project of The Digital Accessibility Team in the Office of the Chief Information Officer. This initiative especially focuses on the importance of the keyboard as an assistive technology for people with motor, visual, and cognitive disabilities. Easton Brundage collaborated with co-fellow Bailey White to create new resources, trainings, and outreach efforts to improve library operations and overall accessibility.

On this team, Easton created a comprehensive assistive technology guide to educate staff on the diverse ways people navigate and engage with Library of Congress websites, apps, and more. This guide includes explanations, video demonstrations, and related resources for various hardware and software assistive technology. Easton also created documentation and workflows to help the team develop lessons; this included a detailed lesson plan framework, a complementing reference guide, and an example lesson plan. These materials streamline future lesson planning and improve current training materials.

Easton also added instructions and explanations to the Year of Keyboard Accessibility activities, so people could have multiple options to participate. It was important to Easton that everyone was given the opportunity to learn more about incorporating accessibility into their daily lives, regardless of their current knowledge about accessibility. Easton’s project created tangible elements to increase people’s options for access and engagement, while raising staff awareness of the needs of people with disabilities.

View: Project Video – Easton Brundage, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Karla Camacho, Yale University

Latin American, Caribbean and European Division
Cine Latine: Shaping Representation at the Movies

As a 2023 Junior Fellow, Karla Camacho, her co-fellows Madeline Griffin and Mateo Arango, and the project mentor Dani Thurber worked with the Latin American, Caribbean, and European Division (LACE) on Cine Latine: Shaping Representation at the Movies. Cine Latine is a two-facet project.

For the first phase of the project, the team developed a Latino Film Research Guide that consists of a curated filmography of Latine films, list of Latine filmmakers, historiography of Latine representation in film, and a compilation of relevant resources for filmmakers and researchers such as organizations, networks, film festivals, and reading material. Karla, Madeline, and Mateo surveyed the library’s collections, conducted extensive research to identify a full list of Latine films and filmmakers, spoke to experts and professionals in the field, read academic texts on Latine film, and wrote essays for the guide.

For the second phase of the project, Karla and her co-fellows created the Cine Latine Interview Series with emerging and established Latine filmmakers. For the interview series, Karla and her co-fellows initiated relationships with filmmakers and their agents, conducted in-depth research into the filmmakers’ careers and projects, drafted interview questions personalized for each filmmaker, and conducted six interviews with filmmakers via Zoom. These efforts resulted in an interview series with Alexis C. Garcia, Aitch Alberto, Alejandra Vasquez, and Patricia Cardoso.

Latine voices have been historically underrepresented in film and filmmaking. In recent time, however, there has been increasing representation of Latine experiences in movies and an increasing amount of Latine film directors, writers, and producers. Aiming to document, highlight, and facilitate users’ access to these histories, films, and voices, the Cine Latine presents an important curated multimedia guide to the past, present, and future of Latine film.

View: Project Video – Karla Camacho, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Noelle Charbonneau, Grand Valley State University

Science, Technology and Business Division
Science & Business Pamphlet Collection

As a 2023 Junior Fellow in the Science, Technology & Business Division, Noelle Charbonneau worked on the Science & Business Pamphlet Collection: an 82-box collection of pamphlets, manuscripts, and other paper-based ephemera transferred to the division for review and processing. Noelle examined the collection’s contents for relevance to either Science, Technology & Business or other Library divisions, consulting with reference librarians to locate the proper home for the materials within the Library. She also began working on inventorying items kept by Science, Technology & Business as a precursor to a formal collection processing plan. More than 350 trade publications across more than 100 different companies were inventoried, and over a thousand pieces of science and business ephemera were sorted for further processing. After identifying notable items within the collection, Noelle also wrote a post for the Library’s Inside Adams blog, which highlights the collections and work of the Science, Technology & Business Division.

As a result of this project, the Science, Technology & Business Division has expanded its collection of materials related to 20th century American industry. This project also called attention to the curation and use of ephemeral materials at the Library of Congress.

View: Project Video – Noelle Charbonneau, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Lum Chi, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Center for Learning, Literacy and Engagement
National Book Festival Literary Programming: Elevating Diverse Voices

The Literary Initiatives Office develops signature literary programs at the Library of Congress, including the National Book Festival. As a Junior Fellow, Lum Chi assisted with the development of Festival programming and promotion, particularly with a focus on elevating diverse voices, and writing public-facing content about the authors and their events. She wrote session descriptions specifically for the marginalized authors in attendance and their books. Then, she assigned tags to their events to help National Book Festival attendees find them and support their work. The final part of her project was writing blog posts that spotlighted the diverse authors attending the National Book Festival. She drafted a blog post that focused on the Black authors and another on the Asian American, Pacific Islander and Indigenous authors. Overall, with this project she hoped to increase visibility, accessibility and opportunities for diverse voices to be amplified and shared with D.C.’s community of readers and nationwide.

View: Project Video – Lum Chi, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Erika Cooley, University of South Florida

National Audio-Visual Conservation Center
Tracing the Evolution of Music Through Innovations in Sound Recording Formats

Junior Fellow Erika Cooley worked at the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center (NAVCC) on the Universal Music Group lacquer disc processing project, a collections-oriented project that involves the creation of metadata for unprocessed master music recordings on 16-inch lacquer discs. The Universal Music Group collection is comprised of over 200,000 recordings on various sound formats that contain the work of influential artists such as Ella Fitzgerald, Tommy Dorsey, and Judy Garland.

These recordings reflect many genres and contain some of the earliest interpretations of standards from the Great American Songbook, a widely accepted catalog of jazz standards, popular songs, and show tunes from the 20th century. Musical compositions were established as “standards” due to their popularity with musicians who would go on to perform, record, and release their own versions of such tunes.

This project explores the role of technological advancements in sound recording, the impact of recording techniques, album releases, and the dissemination of jazz music through various mediums. Erika’s research contributes to a deeper understanding of recorded sound formats and technologies as well as the Great American Songbook's enduring legacy.

View: Project Video – Erika Cooley, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Abigail Cottingham, University of Nebraska, Kearney

Music Division
Martha Graham Legacy Project: Helen McGehee & Umaña Papers

Abigail Cottingham, a 2023 Junior Fellow in the Music Division, organized the papers of choreographer Helen McGehee and artist Umaña, her spouse. The couple contributed appreciably to the artistic legacy of modern dance icon Martha Graham and her company during some of her most innovative and creative years. From amongst the performance programs, sheet music, choreographic notes and costume designs, and photographs in the Helen McGehee and Umaña Papers, Abigail chose a self-published cookbook created by Umaña, through which the intersections of their personal and professional lives emerged. What did food and dance have in common? The stories and recipes inside the cookbook seemed simple, but the people and places described were found throughout the collection’s correspondence, postcards, photographs, and brochures. An old friend’s favorite Spanish paellla dish, a birthday feast that also celebrated a dance performance, and a traditional dinner full of Southern charm were just a few of the connections that could be made through the cookbook. Helen and Umaña were not only represented by the performances and art they created, but by the people they were outside of their professional lives. By uniting conventional materials with their artistic legacy, Abigail shared a way to enrich our understanding of the humanity of the people whose legacies the Music Division collects.

View: Project Video – Abigail Cottingham, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Mark DeSantis, Cheyney University

Office of Communications
The Legacy of Daniel A.P. Murray: The Background of Poetry

2023 Junior Fellow Mark DeSantis explored the power of storytelling in poetry by examining two pieces and their significance within the Daniel A.P. Murray Collection. By looking into the background information of the poets and poems, we are able to gain insight to the motivation for the creation of these works.

However, this project went further than just looking into these poems; it emphasizes the importance of the whole collection. Just through the select poems we are able to view a vast and intense set of emotions, all on important topics and themes. Mark DeSantis argued that in exploring the collection, one can gain a deeper appreciation of not only the poetry, but other works written by African American authors.

In conclusion, Mark highlighted the power of poetry in conveying messages through the exploration of the select poems and their historical context. By understanding this, one is better able to appreciate the poet’s voices and recognize the significance of the collection. This would not only help encourage the listener to view the collection more in-depth but also help develop a better appreciation and interest in the world of poetry and its ability to tell a story.

View: Project Video – Mark DeSantis, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement

Victoria Dey, Northeastern University

Office of the Chief Information Officer/Connecting Communities Digital Initiative
If We Tweet, Will They Come? Guide for Institutional Work with Underrepresented Communities

The Connecting Communities Digital Initiative (CCDI) supports and provides resources to individuals and institutions who use Library digital materials to create projects that center communities of color. As a part of this work, Victoria Dey created a guide to help institutions collaborate with and co-create mutually beneficial outcomes with community partners and interviewed users to learn more about challenges they may face.

In recent years, there has been a substantial effort to reimagine diversity within academic settings and institutions. This important work is often supported by generous grants that provide the necessary financial resources to accomplish such endeavors. One particular area of focus for these grants is the documentation of the histories of underrepresented groups within the emerging field of digital humanities. The introduction of digital platforms for historical purposes has opened up new opportunities for sustainable information recording. However, despite the potential of the digital world, there are several crucial aspects that need to be considered in order for institutional and community work to be truly effective, collaborative, and well-rounded.

This guide aims to address these considerations from the outset and during the initial stages of project development. By doing so, it seeks to foster an environment that promotes efficiency, beneficial outcomes for the institution (specifically the Library of Congress), its grantees, and the targeted community. The guide takes a proactive approach by identifying potential areas of concern and providing tentative solutions to address them.

By addressing these considerations early on, this guide can serve as a roadmap for institutions, grantees, and communities who are embarking on projects to document underrepresented histories using digital tools and methods. It promotes a holistic approach that values collaboration, diverse perspectives, and the active involvement of students. Ultimately, this guide aims to help institutions create an environment that maximizes the potential for impactful and sustainable outcomes, leading to a more inclusive and comprehensive understanding of history.

View: Project Video – Victoria Dey, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Nikki Dobbins, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

Center for Learning, Literacy and Engagement
National Book Festival Literary Programming: Engaging National Audiences

The Literary Initiatives office’s mission is to produce onsite and online literary events that promote reading and connect people with authors and the Library’s collections and experts. One primary focus is programming the National Book Festival.
Nikki Dobbins’ 2023 Junior Fellowship project was to create a virtual attendee guide for the 2023 National Book Festival. The guide’s goal is to help increase the Festival’s visibility and discoverability, encourage digital engagement, and reinforce the “National” aspect of the National Book Festival. The guide encourages national engagement by highlighting and directing virtual attendees to the multiple access points for engaging with Festival programming before, during, and after the Festival date.

The virtual guide will provide guidance on how virtual attendees can use the “Add to Calendar” feature to build their own Festival schedule, find all livestreamed programs, be notified when recorded author presentations become available, discover local watch parties, explore “Great Reads from Great Places” book selections from each state and connect with other virtual attendees nationwide through the hashtag #NatBookFest.

The Virtual Attendee Guide is located on the Library of Congress’ National Book Festival website at loc.gov/bookfest.

View: Project Video – Nikki Dobbins, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Emily Evans, Davidson College

Manuscript Division
Mary Wolfskill Trust Fund Internship: The History of Reproductive Health: Resources in the Manuscript Division

As a Junior Fellow, Emily Evans spent her summer fellowship working onsite in the Manuscript Division. She provided reference services for patrons of the Manuscript Reading Room, and pulled Manuscript Division materials for researchers. She also answered reference questions online through Ask a Librarian.

For Display Day, Emily created a LibGuide of Manuscript Division resources related to the history of reproductive health. The Manuscript Division holds over 73 million items in more than twelve-thousand collections related to American history; this includes the papers of Margaret Sanger, Gregory Pincus, and Min Chueh Chang, all who are major figures in the history of reproductive rights and the creation of the birth control pill. Emily highlighted less well-known figures and collections in order to create a more robust guide for navigating collections related to the history of reproductive health in the Manuscript Division. The LibGuide is a tool to navigate the history of birth control through legal, activist, and medical lenses. It includes general search tips and additional resources held at the Library of Congress. The guide is not intended to be comprehensive, but rather a starting point for researchers interested in the history of reproductive health. Once published, it will be available on the Manuscript Division website alongside other LibGuides.

View: Project Video – Emily Evans, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

David Fiora, Indiana University

U.S. Copyright Office/Office of Copyright Records
Copyright Card Catalog Metadata Capture Project

In the U.S. Copyright Office, Junior Fellow David Fiora collaborated with Junior Fellows Madison Price and Rosalia Garcia to review and update the metadata of digitized, pre-1977 copyright registration records. With over 40 million cards from 1870-1977, a vendor used optical character recognition and other tools to extract the metadata needed to make the cards searchable online. Junior Fellows assisted in this process by providing quality assurance on the extracted card metadata, by editing and reviewing each image in assigned catalog drawers. This work involved correcting mistakes and conducting research in the Catalog of Copyright Entries on specific metadata points for cards. Junior Fellows also assisted in the creation and enhancement of training guides and learning materials to be used by staff for the Copyright Card Catalog Metadata Capture Project. This work has helped to improve the searchability and overall quality of the copyright records in the Copyright Public Records System, the catalog of copyright public records the U.S. Copyright Office (USCO) is in the process of developing.

By providing efficient online access to copyright records that previously had to be obtained in person, individuals can easily engage with the USCO and reflect on a more fully represented American cultural heritage while working to weave a more inclusive American story for the future. This project provided Junior Fellows great insight into the world of copyright law, contracts, database management, the research process, extensible markup language, and instruction design. The work done by the Junior Fellows played an important role in assisting the U.S. Copyright Office achieve their own goals of improving the access to and the discoverability of copyright records by assisting in the development of an online resource that individuals will be able to benefit from for many years to come.

View: Project Video – David Fiora, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Jasper Forster, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Music Division
Enhancing Visibility: American Music Manuscripts

RISM, or the International Inventory of Musical Sources, is an international database that documents extant musical sources worldwide. Previously, RISM only accepted sources created prior to 1800, but have recently changed this to now include manuscripts from any era. This change inspired the following project focused on publishing records of American music manuscripts from the 19th and 20th century held within the Library of Congress to RISM.

As a Junior Fellow in the Music Division, Jasper Forster researched the Music Division’s extensive collections for works in manuscript by African American composers prominent during the 1920s to 1950s. Jasper located these works, reviewed their contents, and gathered metadata to create digital records for each manuscript. This information included location of the source, its call number, how it was acquired, the scoring, any unique attributes, and more. In addition, Jasper encoded music incipits for each manuscript, and sometimes multiple if the work had multiple movements. Once this information was gathered and reviewed, working with their mentor Paul Sommerfeld, Jasper published these digital records to RISM, allowing for further discoverability of these manuscripts by both scholars and performers. This project sheds further light on an important piece of American legacy - specifically African American musical legacy. Composers reported to RISM include Florence B. Price, William Grant Still, Lillian Hardin Armstrong, J. Rosamond Johnson, Billie Holiday, and more.

View: Project Video – Jasper Forster, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Evangeline Gahn, University of Maryland, College Park

Office of the Chief Information Officer
Effective User Research at the Library of Congress

Effective user research remains an important tool for the Library of Congress, in order to ensure user-friendly experiences of the tools used to support internal operations and external access by users. Junior Fellow 2023 Evangeline Gahn, with the support and guidance of Project Mentor Libby Bawcombe, conducted a user research study which focused on the development of a Digital Submission Portal for the Veterans History Project, a congressionally mandated initiative in the American Folklife Center Archive which collects oral histories recording the experiences of American veterans. The research project, which consisted of a comparative review of other institutions' digital submission portals for oral histories, was focused on understanding the way museums, other government agencies, and various veterans’ associations requested biographical metadata from veterans, particularly regarding requests for service history information. The goal of this research was to gain insight into how others account for variations in service history, and how the flexibility of a web-based form can be used to encourage diverse and inclusive collections. It is also the intention of this research to make the metadata collection at the time of donation robust and thorough, in order to ensure accurate and true metadata for each donation to the archive. This is part of a larger initiative to modernize existing digital tools and create equitable, digital alternatives for existing analog processes. Overall, we aim to create digital tools that will help encourage diverse and representative collections at the Library for the American people.

View: Project Video – Evangeline Gahn, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Rosalia Garcia, University of North Texas

U.S. Copyright Office/Office of Copyright Records
Copyright Card Catalog Metadata Capture Project

The U.S. Copyright Office (USCO) Card Catalog Records provides an index to copyright registrations and records from 1870-1977. These records showcase a snapshot of U.S. culture, represented by the materials they reference. Physical access to these records is limited, due to geographic constraints and the risk of deterioration. To address this issue, the U.S. Copyright Office strives to provide online access to U.S. Copyright records, as part of their strategic goal of copyright for all.

2023 Junior Fellow, Rosalia Garcia, supported the U.S. Copyright Office’s goals through her work in the Copyright Card Catalog Metadata Capture Project. The goal of the Copyright Card Catalog Metadata Capture Project is to improve the online discoverability of U.S. Copyright records by enhancing their current metadata. Rosalia’s role within the project was to support the Card Catalog Data Capture (CCDC) clean-up process by reviewing and updating Extensible Markup Language (XML) metadata for copyright records in the Copyright Public Records System (CPRS). This process involved examining and comparing digitized copyright records to their captured metadata records, referencing the Catalog of Copyright Entries (CCE) for accurate metadata, and updating inaccurate metadata. Her updates to the metadata have improved the records’ online searchability, providing greater access to these historical records.

View: Project Video – Rosalia Garcia, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Madeline Griffin, University of New Mexico

Latin American, Caribbean and European Division
Cine Latine: Shaping Latino Representation at the Movies

Cine Latine: Shaping Latino Representation at the Movies seeks to connect Library of Congress users with the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center’s movie collections, as well as highlight films central to the history of Latine representation in U.S. cinema. Latine actors, stories, and characters stretch back to the beginning of cinema, so this project aims to highlight their importance in cinematic history. The culmination of this project is a research guide intended for researchers on Latine history and representation in U.S. cinema, in addition to an interview series targeting emerging and established Latine filmmakers whose work is making a significant impact on the industry.  The research guide involved researching, surveying Library collections, compiling, and creating a full filmography of Latino impact in U.S. cinema. It contains a curated list highlighting relevant film themes, an extensive selection of external resources, in addition to a section dedicated to the potential of Latinx Futurism.

The interview series involved researching films and directors, reaching out to potential interviewees, writing interview questions, as well as leading interviews with filmmakers that will be posted to the Library’s website and within the research guide. This expansive project is the work of three junior fellows: Madeline Griffin, Karla Camacho, and Mateo Arango. Madeline drafted the general interview script and questions used throughout the series in addition to leading interviews with Alexis C. Garcia and Alex Rivera. Within the research guide, Madeline researched films added to the filmography and authored the external resources and latinx futurism sections of the research guide. The combination of the research guide and interview series enables the Library to target a much broader audience than either project alone would permit, with the intention of reaching not only researchers but also curious minds and future filmmakers – aiming to be a lasting resource for the public.

View: Project Video – Madeline Griffin, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Sabrina Gunn, San José State University

National Audio-Visual Conservation Center
American Archive of Public Broadcasting

2023 Junior Fellow Sabrina Gunn explored and implemented digital preservation workflows and methodologies within the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB), a collaboration between the Library of Congress and GBH, a public broadcasting station in Boston, onsite at the Packard Campus of the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center (NAVCC) in Culpeper, Virginia. With over 70 years of materials documenting American political, social, and cultural history, the AAPB serves as a rich source of high-quality public broadcasting programming. Guided by her project mentor, Rachel Curtis, Sabrina learned digital preservation workflows, employed best practices for digital preservation of both moving image and sound recordings, and assisted with digitization initiatives of the Library’s analog collection of Public Broadcasting Service/National Educational Television (PBS/NET) material. Directly applying her knowledge in and experience with A/V archiving and digital moving image and recorded sound formats, Sabrina prepared a broad range of digital files in various file formats for ingestion. She generated and cleaned metadata, edited and executed Python scripts, performed quality control on digitized materials, diagnosed and solved any issues, and produced thorough documentation materials of her processes. Sabrina also reviewed the content of the collection, assessed and selected files appropriate for inclusion in the AAPB Online Reading Room. She created several proposals for potential special collections to add to the AAPB website to enhance the discoverability of historically significant programming.

View: Project Video – Sabrina Gunn, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Isabel Hernandez-Marquez, Florida Gulf Coast University

Office of the Chief Information Officer
Effective User Research at the Library of Congress

Engaging in effective user research continues to be a principal element to understand end users, stakeholders, internal staff, and other communities. During the summer of 2023, Isabel Hernandez-Marquez focused on conducting effective user research to aid the ongoing development of a digital submission tool. Isabel worked under the IT Design and Development Directorate and with various stakeholders. To conduct effective user research to design and develop digital products, Isabel became familiar with current processes, applied best practices, gathered background information, and worked with stakeholders to build approaches that improve digital products. Isabel and her project mentor, Libby Bawcombe, planned and conducted a user research study to review twenty-eight websites on a smartphone. This study complements a previous study that also sought to understand the digital submission experience for users, stakeholders, and for implementation in other projects. This study applied effective user research aiding the development of tools that donors can use and to streamline an efficient submission experience regarding digital media content. The purpose of this project seeks to improve access to digital products and realize a modernization goal of the Library of Congress that is more user-centered.

View: Project Video – Isabel Hernandez-Marquez, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Olivia Hewang, Wellesley College

Office of the Chief Information Officer/Connecting Communities Digital Initiative
If We Tweet, Will They Come? Building Identity and Solidarity: Asian American Activism in the 1960s and 70s

The Connecting Communities Digital Initiative (CCDI) supports and provides resources to individuals and institutions who use Library digital materials to create projects that center communities of color. As a part of this work, Olivia created a guide to help present day Asian American activists and artists draw connections to a history of Asian American activism in the 1960s and 70s. The guide highlights interracial solidarity and empowers artists and activists to take inspiration from and remix historical materials in their work.

Beginning in the late 1960s, Asian Americans emerged as a pan ethnic identity group that was experiencing a political awakening. This movement was highly intersectional in nature, as Asian American activists often aligned themselves with other “Third World” people of color in order to resist oppression and racism together. Instances of interracial solidarity highlighted in the guide include the Third World Liberation Front strikes for ethnic studies and the Delano Grape Strike. As part of the guide, Olivia compiled an extensive list of resources on her topic, bringing Library collections into conversation with external archives. Olivia hopes that her guide will help Asian Americans feel connected to a history of activism and will provide insight into finding and using Asian American materials in the Library’s Digital Collections.

View: Project Video – Olivia Hewang, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Carter Jackson, Boston University

Prints and Photographs Division
Paul Marvin Rudolph Architectural Archive  

Carter Jackson’s Junior Fellowship in the Prints and Photographs Division was focused on inventorying a selection of the Library’s material from the archive of Paul Marvin Rudolph (1918-1997), one of the most controversial American architects. While he designed buildings ranging from mid-century beachfront homes to 1980s office towers, Rudolph is most famous for his concrete Brutalist projects from the 1960s. These highly expressive buildings are products of unique, post-war social and political circumstances, which can make them challenging to appreciate and adapt, often leading to their neglect and demolition. Carter’s project, in collaboration with his co-fellow, Robert Johnson, specifically involved generating metadata for an overlooked selection of the drawings, prints, photographs, and manuscripts within the Library’s Paul M. Rudolph archive that are believed to have been used by the architect to produce publications highlighting his own work.

This portion of the archive provides insight into how Rudolph himself wanted his often-polarizing projects to be seen and understood, but these materials represent only a small part of the collection. Carter’s Display Day presentation provides an example of the stories that can be revealed through looking deeper into the archive. He considers the range of prints, photographs, and manuscript materials related to the Boston Government Service Center, one of Rudolph’s most controversial projects of the 1960s, to show that this now dilapidated and unfinished building was once part of a very progressive vision intended to provide assistance to Boston’s unemployed population and people with mental illness. The Library’s work to process and make the Rudolph archive more accessible will enable researchers to uncover other hidden histories, which can help the public more thoughtfully preserve and modify Rudolph’s buildings. The process of organizing a collection to improve its accessibility has been valuable for Carter, as he prepares for a career as a curator.

View: Project Video – Carter Jackson, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Robert Johnson, University of Maryland, College Park

Prints and Photographs Division
Paul Marvin Rudolph Architectural Archive

In 1997, the Prints & Photographs Division acquired the archive of the architect Paul Marvin Rudolph (1918-1997). The collection contains over 150,000 drawings, prints, photographs, and manuscript items related to Rudolph’s work. His style evolved over his career, starting with modern residences and growing to large, institutional buildings in the brutalist style. Many of Rudolph’s buildings are being reevaluated as they age, and decisions must be made about whether to maintain the original designs, redevelop them, or even demolish them entirely.

Robert Johnson, along with co-fellow Carter Jackson, reviewed and organized a selection of the Rudolph visual materials that were published in books and magazines. He enhanced their description by inputting data such as title, date, media, size, and condition of each item. These metadata assist both the Prints & Photographs staff and researchers in easily locating items. Architectural materials have unique considerations. An architect produces many types of drawings, from early design sketches to polished renderings, which convey a variety of information. These drawings are created in different media types, some of which require special handling. By recording this descriptive information, the collection is made more accessible to researchers.

The Rudolph archive is a valuable resource for the study of modernist architecture. The materials provide insight into Rudolph’s original vision and preserve his artistic output. Researchers will be able to evaluate his projects in their original context and use the items to inform how the buildings are understood and maintained in the present and into the future. As a future archivist, this project gave Robert valuable experience handling a variety of materials and describing specialized content within a very large collection.

View: Project Video – Robert Johnson, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Yeji Kim, Yale University

Office of Chief Information Officer/Connecting Communities Digital Initiative
If We Tweet, Will They Come? Threads of Asia

The Connecting Communities Digital Initiative (CCDI) supports and provides resources to individuals and institutions who use the Library’s digital materials to create projects that center communities of color. As a part of this work, Yeji Kim created a guide to help Asian American designers and textile artists create works based on historically and culturally significant fabrics from Asian communities and interviewed users to learn more about challenges they may face. Yeji decided to choose this audience because of both her personal interest in Asian textiles as well as the lack of centralized resources for this group. In the project, she first set historical context by looking into migration patterns and how fabrics have moved from Asia to America and studied how those fabrics were historically used in both countries. She also examined examples of how these kinds of materials were used in the US and how designers could potentially use them in the future. Throughout the guide, she discussed appreciation versus appropriation in utilizing culturally historical fabrics and designs. Some of the sources she looked into include books about Asian textiles, images of Korean hanbok and traditional Hmong clothing, and conducted interviews with Library staff to get a better sense of these materials in the context of the American fashion industry. Several other themes touched on in this guide include the ideas of displacement and diaspora in the context of being Asian American, utilizing digital prints and photographs, and the importance of using culture and history in clothing pieces.

View: Project Video – Yeji Kim, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Ester Luna, Yale University

Signature Programs Office/National Book Festival
Archiving the National Book Festival

Ester Luna’s 2023 Junior Fellowship project aimed to highlight events and activities offered at the National Book Festival other than the author panels and book signings. For instance, the Festival also features booths for each of its sponsors and interactive activities for children and families alike, and media sponsors like PBS host livestreamed discussions with some of the authors in the weeks leading up to the Festival. Ester’s project consisted of writing a series of posts for the Library of Congress blog “Bookmarked,” each of which documented a different component of the 2023 Festival—thus drawing attention to and generating enthusiasm for aspects of this year’s Festival that are not as heavily publicized on the main National Book Festival website, and centralizing all of this information on one online platform. Hence, the blog series encouraged individuals and groups of all ages and interests to attend and facilitated participation in virtual events for those who could not come in person, enhancing the accessibility and broadening the outreach of the Festival.

View: Project Video – Ester Luna, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Amina Malik, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Asian Division
Inventory of South Asian Serial Titles

Junior Fellow Amina Malik was tasked to inventory serials in South Asian languages housed with the Asian Division. A main goal of this project was to enhance discoverability of the Library of Congress’ online catalog for patrons. Each serial held unique attributes, which shaped the way Amina created and updated their records. The diversity in language, publication frequency, set size, and numbering systems resulted in each serial having a different workflow than their companions on the shelf.

Amina’s comprehension of South Asian languages supported the workflow of inventorying serials, especially when assessing the gaps and discrepancies they held. In addition to enhancing the discoverability of serials for patrons on the public-facing library catalog, Amina created detailed inventories so staff in the Asian Division would have better access to collections on the back-end.

This project required multiple sources of collaboration, notably the Acquisitions and Bibliographic Access (ABA), cataloging colleagues with South Asian language and subject specialties, and colleagues from New Delhi and Islamabad LC offices. Towards the project’s conclusion, Amina inventoried approximately 60 serials and 1300 volumes in 13 languages.

In addition to serial inventory, Amina produced a blog post for 4 Corners of the World, a social media platform the Asian Division frequently contributes to. Amina’s blog post highlighted some of the Urdu serials she encountered during her time at the Asian Division, looking specifically towards women’s serials published in Pakistan, and examined the historical and social trends in the lives of their consumers.

View: Project Video – Amina Malik, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Hannah Meyer, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Science, Technology, and Business Division
Adding Diversity to the Business History Record

While working in the Science, Business and Technology Division, Junior Fellow Hannah Meyer wrote and published “This Month in Business History” entries for the Business Reference Section. These entries highlight the important contributions made by individuals and organizations from historically underrepresented groups whose work often goes unrecognized in U.S. business history.  Focusing on the contributions of historically marginalized groups expands opportunities for diverse audiences to engage with the Library. To prepare, Hannah did extensive research using Library of Congress materials, which she synthesized into a research guide featuring a substantive biography or organizational profile depending on the topic. The entries also highlighted a variety of resources which included print resources, Library of Congress digital resources, and internet resources. By making these resources more discoverable, this project enhances understanding of the country’s historical record.

Hannah specifically focused on the contributions of A. Philip Randolph and the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters in creating just working conditions for the Pullman porters, advancing civil rights, and contributing to the rise of the Black middle class. In addition, Hannah created an entry on the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union which represented workers in the clothing industry who were primarily young immigrant women. This union conducted strikes to bring about safer working conditions, fewer hours, and more pay. Bringing awareness to this history is useful for understanding the current American atmosphere towards race and workplace rights. This project will hopefully support and encourage additional research on these important subjects.

View: Project Video – Hannah Meyer, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Natalie Miller, Cornell University

Center for Learning, Literacy and Engagement
National Book Festival Literary Programming: Amplifying Latino Voices

As a 2023 Junior Fellow, Natalie Miller worked in the Literary Initiatives Office whose mission is to produce onsite and online literary events that promote reading and connect people with authors and the Library’s collections and experts. She assisted with the development of National Book Festival programming and promotion, with a specific focus on amplifying Latino voices through the written public-facing festival content. Through this fellowship, she worked to develop program content for the Festival by writing and editing session descriptions and author biographies, organizing content for the Festival’s digital presence, and researching and assigning tags to sessions. Increasing Latino audiences is a goal of both the Office and the Festival. Through her project, Natalie hopes to draw new audience members for the current and future Festivals.

View: Project Video – Natalie Miller, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Courtney Murray, Pennsylvania State University

Serial and Government Publications Division
Researching the 19th and Early 20th Century Black Press in Chronicling America

The Chronicling America historic newspapers online collection is a product of the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) and jointly sponsored by the Library of Congress and the National Endowment for the Humanities. In 2021-2023, the Library of Congress made a collection of nineteenth and twentieth century miscellaneous African American newspapers accessible for research in Chronicling America.

2023 Junior Fellow Courtney Murray worked with the Serial and Government Publications Division to provide more context for these important newspapers. Courtney wrote ten title essays on newspapers from the collection that are crucial in understanding the African American Press and African American history. Her essays covered single-issue antebellum and postbellum newspapers, a part of the Colored Conventions Movement, long-running newspapers significant to the Midwest press scene, newspapers with African American women as editors and reporters, first of their kind East Coast newspapers like the Colored American published in Augusta, Georgia, and so on. These essays also provided more details about how these newspapers served their local, regional, national, and political communities. Once added to Chronicling America, Courtney’s essays will help researchers, families, and students understand the diverse contexts, networks, and communities represented by the African American press in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

View: Project Video – Courtney Murray, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Lindsay Musil, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Manuscript Division
Elizabeth Brown Pryor Internship: Enhancing Engagement with Manuscript Collections by Exploring Intersectional Perspectives

2023 Junior Fellow Lindsay Musil collaborated with the Manuscript Division’s librarians, historians, and archivists to produce a series of blogs that spotlights the division’s diverse collections. Along with these blogs, Lindsay created resources focused on engaging students in orienting themselves and their research with the Manuscript Reading Room.

The blog series supports the Manuscript Division’s strategic goal of enhancing the accessibility and discoverability of over 73 million items related to American history and culture across more than 12,000 collections. During her internship in the Manuscript Reading Room, Lindsay’s work provided reference services to researchers online and in person at the reference desk that informed her research for the blog series.

In addition to writing and publishing at least three full-length posts, Lindsay queued up between 5-10 stub posts for future authors to expand upon and add to the series. Lindsay was ideally situated to recommend additional content for inclusion in pre-existing LibGuides and potential topics for future guides.

Lindsay’s blog posts can be found on Unfolding History, the Manuscript Division’s blog.

View: Project Video – Lindsay Musil, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Elle Nicoletti, Boston University

Researcher & Reference Services Division
Local History of U.S. Immigrant Communities, 1880-1924

As a 2023 Junior Fellow, Elle Nicoletti worked with the Humanities and Social Sciences Section of the Researcher and Reference Services Division on a project titled “Local History of U.S. Immigrant Communities from 1880-1924,” an ongoing project aimed at creating a more centralized, accessible, and diverse set of resources relating to immigrant history at the Library of Congress. The arrival of new populations to the United States during this period of intensive immigration resulted in the emergence of unique immigrant communities depending on nationality, ethnicity, religion, location, and many other factors. Using resources from across the Library, Elle worked to create a substantial research bibliography, as well as Today in History entries for the Library’s website. The project module she developed, “Working Together: Immigrant Solidarity in the Garment Industry,” looks at the intersection of immigration and the labor movement in the early 20th century by comparing two major labor strikes: the “Uprising of the 20,000” among garment workers in New York City (1909), and the “Bread and Roses” strike among textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts (1912). Together these strikes highlight the essential role of immigrant workers, and particularly young female workers, within the history of labor unions and the movement for workers’ rights. By examining immigrant communities through the lens of these events, Elle’s module seeks especially to foreground individual immigrant stories and experiences against the larger backdrop of cultural, historical and economic forces of the era.

View: Project Video – Elle Nicoletti, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Madison Price, Emporia State University

U.S. Copyright Office/Office of Copyright Records
Copyright Card Catalog Metadata Capture Project

This project aimed to capture metadata for all of the Office of Copyright Record’s digitized copyright application cards and make them available through the Copyright Public Records System (CPRS). The current priority is records created between 1938 and 1945. To accomplish this, a vendor captured specific metadata from the cards. Madison Price, 2023 Junior Fellow, and two other interns acted as first level reviewers. They were the human side of an automated process, cleaning up errors and illegible text in the metadata for these cards before sending the files to second and final level reviewers. This involved referencing the extracted data file, the scanned image, and the Catalog of Copyright Entries to ensure the accuracy of the pulled information. The accuracy they ensure increases the findability and usability of these copyright records, some of which are the only digitized records available for a number of works. What Madison and the other reviewers can provide that a computer program cannot is historical context and a human perspective to the information on the cards. The goal is to provide library users with a historically important snapshot of the culture of the United States. These records are a gateway to millions of creative works from books to periodicals to music to sculptures and more. Through this project, Madison reviewed 6,000 cards to be uploaded for access by the public.

View: Project Video – Madison Price, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Vierra Queen, Spelman College

Office of Communications
The Legacy of Daniel A.P. Murray: Back to Africa: The Reconstruction Campaign that Sent Freed African Americans Back to Africa Between 1820 and 1900

The Back-to-Africa movement was based on the widespread belief among some European Americans in the 18th and 19th century that African Americans would want to return to the continent of Africa. Although the political movement was considered a widespread failure as many few former freed slaves wanted to move to Africa, it energized an abolitionist movement in the United States in the 1850s. This push to go back to Africa also inspired U.S. interest in Liberia, one of the first countries founded by free people of color in the United States. The Daniel A.P. Murray archive currently has dozens of documents analyzing the stories of those involved in the organization of the colony of Monrovia, Liberia, those opposed to this movement, and the stories of African Americans who participated in this venture. It is essential to share these stories and bring light to a movement not often discussed in abolitionist and civil rights era banter.

View: Project Video – Vierra Queen, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Erica Quinones, University of Delaware, Newark

Office of the Chief Information Officer/Connecting Communities Digital Initiative
If We Tweet, Will They Come? Designing Liberation: Printing Queer Latinx Activism in the 1970s

The Connecting Communities Digital Initiative (CCDI) supports and provides resources to individuals and institutions who use the Library’s digital materials to create projects that center communities of color. As a part of this work, Erica Quinones designed a guide to help queer Latinx create zines about and inspired by the 1970s gay liberation movement, and interviewed users to learn more about challenges they may face. Sparked by the 1969 Stonewall Uprisings, the gay liberation movement wasn’t the first gay rights movement in the United States, but it was one of the largest. A new, younger generation of activists mobilized across the country, demanding the end of discriminatory policies, dispelling of homophobic attitudes, and the freedom to be openly queer. Among the plethora of blossoming gay rights groups was the Gay Liberation Front (GLF), a national organization of radical activists who not only demanded civil rights but liberation. Their liberatory purview connected gay liberation to racial justice, feminism, and other civil rights movements of the time, leading them to work in coalition with likeminded organizations, like the Black Panther Party and the Young Lords Party. Their youthful face and intersectional focus attracted many queer and trans people of color (QTPOC) to their ranks, who created their own subgroups, like Third World Gay Revolution (TWGR), which gave space to voices of color and focused on their unique needs. TWGR certainly wasn’t the only gay liberation group to focus on QTPOC’s experiences, nor were they the longest lasting, but they are iconic for their use of graphic design. Studying TWGR’s members and advocacy helps us not only understand how Latinx identity and experiences uniquely shaped their politics and communities, but how contemporary QTPOC print culture continues these traditions.

View: Project Video – Erica Quinones, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Amanda Roberts, Simmons University

Center for Learning, Literacy and Engagement/Informal Learning Office
Engaging Families at the Library

As a 2023 Junior Fellow, Amanda Roberts worked in the Informal Learning Office creating a discovery box for The Source, a new experiential learning space for kids, teens, and families. The Source will be located in the Southwest Corridor of the Thomas Jefferson building of the Library of Congress. Discovery boxes allow visitors to follow a Library user’s research from the initial research question to the final creative takeaway. The discovery boxes introduce children (ages 9-13) to the Library’s primary sources and collections.

The box that Amanda created invites children to explore female activists related to labor in the 20th century. In addition to the box, Amanda has developed a blog post for Minerva’s Kaleidoscope, the Library’s blog for kids and families. She has also served as a mentor for the teens participating in the Informal Learning Office’s High School Summer Internship.

View: Project Video – Amanda Roberts, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Suzanne L. Schulz, Hunter College, City University New York

Center for Learning, Literacy and Engagement/Professional Learning and Outreach Initiatives
Culturally Relevant Pedagogy with LC Digital Collections: African American Writers and Artists for Sovereignty: The U.S. Occupation of Haiti and Its Aftermath

2023 Junior Fellow Suzanne L. Schulz worked with the Library’s Professional Learning and Outreach Initiatives Office (PLOI) on the project, “Culturally Relevant Pedagogy with LC Digital Collections.” Drawing on digital resources from loc.gov, Suzanne created teaching materials for the Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) Teachers Network that highlight Library items focusing on African American artistic and intellectual movements that promoted sovereignty for Haiti before, during, and after the U.S. occupation (1915-1934). This set of sources featuring Haiti represents just one example of the efforts of African Americans to connect with colonized peoples abroad during this time. Guided by tenets of culturally relevant pedagogy, Suzanne’s project highlighted the historical significance and wider interconnectedness of African American and Haitian communities whose contributions have been marginalized in textbooks, syllabi, and public discourse. Suzanne’s suggested teaching activities invite students to explore the Library’s digital collections for primary source-based stories of African Americans who shared arts and ideas about freedom, justice, and sovereignty across borders. Suzanne believes that teaching with primary sources aligns well with culturally relevant pedagogy, an approach that respects students’ unique knowledge, experience, and skills.

View: Project Video – Suzanne L. Schulz, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Savannah Scott, Bridgewater College

Office of the Chief Information Officer/QA and Testing Division
Quality Assurance and Testing Using the Agile Methodology

The Quality Assurance (QA) and Testing team of the IT Design and Development Division is responsible for evaluating and testing updates to essential LOC websites, such as Congress.gov. As a part of the project Quality Assurance and Testing Using the Agile Methodology, Savannah Scott explored using test automation to modernize the bill summary workflow for Congress.gov. A helpful website for both researchers and the average citizen, Congress.gov is used to communicate the legislative process and congressional information to the public. By optimizing testing through automation, it will be easier for the QA and development teams to maintain and add new features to the site. After executing manual tests to gain an understanding of the workflow, Cypress with Cucumber (an open-sourced Javascript based frontend testing application) was used to write and implement automated tests for the site. Throughout the project, Savannah and the team utilized the Agile methodology to coordinate tasks, streamline communication, and optimize team efficiency. The Agile methodology breaks tasks into manageable tickets to be completed during the three-week sprint (working period). Agile uses different meetings throughout the sprint lifecycle to create multiple points for team communication, and is focused on producing deliverables for the user. Savannah and her team members participated in the sprint review, a team-wide demonstration of the tasks and deliverables completed during the sprint. She presented her working code, which automated logging in, user assignment, and analyst intake tests for congress.gov webpages. With both Agile methodology and the Cypress framework, Savannah was able to automate different tests for Congress.gov that will make a significant impact on future releases and schedules helping the team transition the regression tests from manual to automated.

View: Project Video – Savannah Scott, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Kathleen Senn, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Preservation Services Division
Inventory Review Protocols for International Collection Materials

This project examined how quality control measures could be standardized and refined so that international collection materials are able to be found, used, and enjoyed by all users of the Library of Congress.

At the Library of Congress, titles and authors of books in non-Roman scripts are converted into the Roman alphabet in a process called romanization. The Roman alphabet is used to write the English language. Romanized titles and authors are used in the records for these items in the Library catalog. This helps people to find (and help others find) items quickly even if they are not fluent in a language. Quality control involves comparing a physical item and the record associated with it to make sure that they match. If they match, the item can be discovered by Library staff and patrons. If not, an item can be difficult to locate.

Kathleen’s role in the project was to understand the current state of quality control procedures in cataloging across different departments in the Library, look at the data being collected about these procedures, and make suggestions about how to proceed with quality control in the future.

View: Project Video – Kathleen Senn, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Grace Shao, Georgia Institute of Technology

Office of the Chief Information Officer/QA and Testing Division
Quality Assurance and Testing Using the Scaled Agile Framework

As a 2023 Junior Fellow, Grace Shao worked in the Office of the Chief Information Officer with the User Experience Design Team and Quality Assurance Team. Grace’s internship focused on Software Quality Assurance and automation testing, learning to use technologies such as Cypress (with JavaScript), Cucumber, and Gitlab to automate test cases for congress.gov sites. Grace created automated test cases to test user functionality and simulate user writing summaries for bills in a site called Bill Summary Workflow, which manages senate bills that are ultimately published to congress.gov. This project reinforces the functionality of the congress.gov site so users can have a flawless experience using the site.

Grace also had the opportunity to develop an understanding of the Scaled Agile Framework, which is a form of project management for large teams. She had the opportunity to shadow the SCRUM master, learning how a large UI/UX and Quality Assurance team manages their project with SCRUM meetings and “Story Grooming” meetings, where tickets or tasks are assigned to developers. Grace also learned to use project management tools such as Jira and Confluence, a project tracking software that creates SCRUM boards to manage issues and delegate tasks, to communicate and take tasks from her team.

View: Project Video – Grace Shao, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Samiah Sudler-Brooks, Howard University

Office of the Chief Information Officer/Connecting Communities Digital Initiative
If We Tweet, Will They Come? The Journey to Our Rights: African American Activism from the 1900s- Present Day

The Connecting Communities Digital Initiative (CCDI) supports and provides resources to individuals and institutions who use the Library’s digital materials to create projects that center communities of color. As a part of this work, Samiah Sudler-Brooks created a guide to help K-12 students create collages and black-out poetry to engage with African American activism from the 1900s to the present, and interviewed users to learn more about challenges they may face.

Over the years, the pivotal moment of black history has evolved in today’s world. From slavery to Jim Crow, black history has become even more significant. With the recent #BlackLivesMatter protests, Samiah wanted to analyze the history and development of African American organizations from the 1900s to the present day to make it accessible for K-12 students. Today, K-12 students are not exposed to the vast array of African American activists who participated in the Civil Rights Movement. While students learn about Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks, there are many more African American activists they should be aware of. While exploring the Library’s collections, “NAACP: A Century in the Fight for Freedom,” Samiah learned about other activists such as W.E.B. DuBois, Ida B. Wells, and Stokely Carmichael. She also explored materials on the National Association for the Colored People (NAACP), Black Panther Party (BPP), #Black Lives Matter (#BLM), and Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) for her research and created collages for each organization. By using her guide, K-12 students will be able to learn about the history of these organizations and activists and engage with them through the creation of collages and black-out poetry.

View: Project Video – Samiah Sudler-Brooks, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Majestie Varnado, Texas Woman's University

Office of the Chief Information Officer/Connecting Communities Digital Initiative
If We Tweet, Will They Come? Heavy is the Hair: Evolution of African Hair in America from the 17th c. to the 20th c.

The Connecting Communities Digital Initiative (CCDI) supports and provides resources to individuals and institutions who use the Library’s digital materials to create projects that center communities of color. As a part of this work, Majestie Varnado created a guide to help benefit creatives in media, historians, and individuals with an interest in Black hair to create films, television, art, and informed scholarship, andinterviewed users to learn more about challenges they may face.

Heavy is the Hair: Evolution of African Hair in America from the 17th c. to the 20th c. is a curatorial guide to African haircare/hairstyling in the Americas over the course of 400 years. This guide will chronicle the ways in which Africans adapted hair expression amidst legal and discriminatory policing, barriers to haircare products and tools, assimilation, and resistance. This guide is intended to benefit creatives in media, historians, and individuals with an interest in Black hair by creating a more robust understanding of African-American hair throughout 400 years of history.

2023 CCDI Junior Fellow Majestie Varnado incorporated materials from LOC digital collections including the Gladstone Collection of African American Photographs, the Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers’ Project collection, the African American Photographs Assembled for the 1900 Paris Exposition collection, and the Images of African American Slavery and Freedom collection—as well as other items found throughout the library, the American Folklife center, and more.
This project intended to help create a timeline of Black hairstyling and haircare while investigating the perspectives of African-American hair history available in tandem with perspectives not included or lost to time. African-American hair has historically been a topic of political and cultural intrigue, and this project examined the ways in which scholarship and anecdotal history collide.

View: Project Video – Majestie Varnado, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Hannah Whitaker, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

National Audio-Visual Conservation Center
Preservation of Early Recorded Sound Materials from the Universal Music Group Collection

For her project, Hannah Whitaker worked at the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center (NAVCC) processing 16” lacquer discs from the Universal Music Group (UMG) collection. Lacquers are grooved-disc formats of recorded sound, similar to vinyl, that were primarily used to record live sessions throughout the 1930s, ‘40s, and ‘50s. They were created by coating an aluminum disc with a thin, malleable layer of nitrocellulose, which grooves were then etched into using a lathe machine. Due to the age of the discs, coupled with the fragility of lacquer, many of the materials from the collection were in poor condition, requiring timely interventions in order to mitigate any further damage and preserve the music.

As an avid record collector herself, Hannah became especially interested in learning the best practices for audio preservation, which led her on a journey across the NAVCC to speak with specialists in preservation, digitization, and restoration. These conversations with experts made clear the importance of timely damage mitigation and continuous preservation, as well as highlighted the cutting-edge technology used at the NAVCC to preserve and digitize music for generations to come. 

View: Project Video – Hannah Whitaker, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Bailey White Foster, Texas Woman's University

Office of the Chief Information Officer/User Experience Design Section
Year of Keyboard Accessibility

The Year of Keyboard Accessibility Program is an initiative by the Office of the Chief Information Officer's (OCIO) Digital Accessibility Team. It is an initiative to raise awareness at the Library of Congress about how to create accessible experiences. It focuses on the importance of the keyboard in supporting individuals with motor, visual, and cognitive disabilities.

Junior Fellows Bailey White and Easton Brundage collaborated on several projects. They created staff resources, wrote accessibility tips for the OCIO’s weekly newsletter, and designed activities for the Year of Keyboard Accessibility homepage.

Bailey contributed to this initiative in different ways. She created and wrote sections of a guide that introduces different types of assistive technology. This guide educates staff about the different ways that people interact with digital content and the importance of creating accessible web pages. She also co-wrote several accessibility tips for the weekly newsletter. One tip explained the importance of CamelCase and hashtag accessibility. Bailey also drafted an activity that explains the importance of accessible structure and reading order within web pages.

These resources created for the Year of Keyboard Accessibility provide guidance and support to staff. They raise awareness of the importance of creating accessible digital content. Despite the short time period of the internship, the resources created by Bailey and Easton will live on within the Digital Accessibility Team's Intranet site and will assist staff for years to come.

View: Project Video – Bailey White Foster, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Alexandra Yaralian, University of Maryland, College Park

Asian and Middle Eastern Division
Access for Newly Acquired Armenian-American Materials Project

2023 Junior Fellow Alexandra Yaralian worked on the Access for Newly Acquired Armenian-American Materials Project in the Asian and Middle Eastern Division. This project involved processing and creating initial bibliographic control records for about 160 materials published in the Americas from the Antranig Poladian Collection. Poladian was an Armenian-American journalist and his collection includes over 1,962 serials and monographs published in the 19th - 21st centuries. Gifted by Gevork and Zepure Koushagjian, the Poladian Collection comprises works ranging from Armenian history to Armenian poetry.

The materials are published in the Armenian, English, and Spanish languages. This project contributes to the accessibility of monographs about the Armenian diaspora and Armenian history, literature, and music. By making these materials accessible to the public, the Access for Newly Acquired Armenian-American Materials Project strives to create a deeper understanding of Armenian history and culture.

View: Project Video – Alexandra Yaralian, Summer 2023 Junior Fellow, personal statement.

Legacy Links

The Junior Fellows Program is now in its 32nd Year. View sample links of this legacy program.

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The Junior Fellows summer intern program has been a signature initiative of the Library of Congress since 1991.The Junior Fellows Program is made possible by a gift from the late James Madison Council member Nancy Glanville Jewell through the Glanville Family Foundation and the Knowledge Navigators Trust Fund and by an investment from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.