Book/Printed Material The Vermontville colony, its genesis and history, with personal sketches of the colonists,

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Title
The Vermontville colony, its genesis and history, with personal sketches of the colonists,
Summary
This is a detailed history of the founding and development of Vermontville, Michigan. Under the leadership of a Congregational minister named Sylvester Cochrane, a group of men from Bennington, Poultney, Benson, Orwell and other Vermont communities signed a compact pledging to honor the Gospel and the Sabbath, to provide jointly for certain community services, and to pool their money to purchase land "in the western country." Arriving in Michigan's Thornapple River Valley in 1836, the colony gave each member a farm lot of 160 acres and a village lot of ten acres to develop with his family. A church, a school and an academy were also part of the master plan from the outset. Vermontville's economic growth exemplified that of many small Michigan towns. At first, the settlers were heavily dependent on the Indians for food. In time, they produced enough to feed themselves and to exchange for the other goods and services they needed. A doctor arrived; a store opened; eventually Vermontville had its own weekly newspaper. Attracted initially by the projected Clinton and Kalamazoo canal, the residents found themselves fully integrated with other Michigan communities as railroad routes proliferated throughout the region. Besides its account of major local events, this work offers thumbnail sketches of Vermontville's founding citizens.
Contributor Names
Barber, Edward W.
Created / Published
Lansing, Mich., Robert Smith Printing Co. [1897]
Subject Headings
-  Vermontville (Mich.)
Notes
-  Caption title.
-  Also available in digital form on the Library of Congress Web site.
Medium
93 p. illus. 23 cm.
Call Number/Physical Location
F574.V5 B2
Digital Id
http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gdc/lhbum.07056
Library of Congress Control Number
20007056
Online Format
online text
image
pdf
Description
This is a detailed history of the founding and development of Vermontville, Michigan. Under the leadership of a Congregational minister named Sylvester Cochrane, a group of men from Bennington, Poultney, Benson, Orwell and other Vermont communities signed a compact pledging to honor the Gospel and the Sabbath, to provide jointly for certain community services, and to pool their money to purchase land "in the western country." Arriving in Michigan's Thornapple River Valley in 1836, the colony gave each member a farm lot of 160 acres and a village lot of ten acres to develop with his family. A church, a school and an academy were also part of the master plan from the outset. Vermontville's economic growth exemplified that of many small Michigan towns. At first, the settlers were heavily dependent on the Indians for food. In time, they produced enough to feed themselves and to exchange for the other goods and services they needed. A doctor arrived; a store opened; eventually Vermontville had its own weekly newspaper. Attracted initially by the projected Clinton and Kalamazoo canal, the residents found themselves fully integrated with other Michigan communities as railroad routes proliferated throughout the region. Besides its account of major local events, this work offers thumbnail sketches of Vermontville's founding citizens.
LCCN Permalink
https://lccn.loc.gov/20007056
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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Barber, Edward W. The Vermontville colony, its genesis and history, with personal sketches of the colonists. [Lansing, Mich., Robert Smith Printing Co, 1897] Pdf. https://www.loc.gov/item/20007056/.

APA citation style:

Barber, E. W. (1897) The Vermontville colony, its genesis and history, with personal sketches of the colonists. [Lansing, Mich., Robert Smith Printing Co] [Pdf] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/20007056/.

MLA citation style:

Barber, Edward W. The Vermontville colony, its genesis and history, with personal sketches of the colonists. [Lansing, Mich., Robert Smith Printing Co, 1897] Pdf. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/20007056/>.