Photo, Print, Drawing The result of the Fifteenth Amendment, and the rise and progress of the African race in America and its final accomplishment, and celebration on May 19th, A.D., 1870

[ digital file from original print ]

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[ color film copy transparency ]
[ b&w film copy neg. ]

About this Item

Title
The result of the Fifteenth Amendment, and the rise and progress of the African race in America and its final accomplishment, and celebration on May 19th, A.D., 1870
Summary
One of several large commemorative prints marking the enactment on March 30, 1870, of the Fifteenth Amendment, and showing the parade celebrating it which was held in Baltimore on May 19 the same year. The amendment declared that the right to vote "shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude." Here the parade winds down Monument Street from Baltimore's Washington Monument. In the left distance is the spire of the First Presbyterian Church. Heading the parade are a small troop of black Zouaves, holding rifles across their shoulders. They are followed by several men on horseback wearing top hats and sashes, several floats, and more soldiers. The sidewalks are lined with onlookers, many of them black. Framing the central image are a series of vignettes. At left are portrait busts of the late Pennsylvania representative and champion of black suffrage Thaddeus Stevens, Maryland representative Henry Winter Davis, author of the Wade-Davis Bill, and Massachusetts senator Charles Sumner. At right are busts of distinguished blacks Martin Robinson Delany, Frederick Douglass, and Hiram R. Revels. In the upper left corner of the print is an antebellum plantation scene, where a mustachioed overseer supervises slaves picking cotton. Nearby is an elegant house surrounded by palm trees. Beneath the scene are the words, "We are in bondage. O deliver us!" In contrast, the right hand corner holds a Civil War scene of black troops rushing into battle, with the words "We fought for Liberty, we now enjoy" below. In the center, above the parade scene, appear busts of (left to right) Lincoln, Baltimore jurist Hugh Lennox Bond, abolitionist martyr John Brown, Vice president Schuyler Colfax, and President Ulysses S. Grant. The three busts in the center rest on crossed laurel branches and flags. In the lower corners stand two parade groups of black men wearing Masonic sashes and aprons. They carry banners decorated with allegorical figures as well as the portraits of Lincoln, Grant, and Swiss patriot William Tell and his son. Between these groups are two small scenes: a black schoolroom with the words "Education will be our pride," and a black preacher before his congregation, with the words, "The day of Jubilee has come."
Contributor Names
Metcalf & Clark
Created / Published
[Baltimore] : Published by Metcalf & Clark, 687 W. Baltimore St., c1870.
Subject Headings
-  African Americans (portrayed), in the U.S. military
-  Baltimore, Md
-  Bond, Hugh Lenox
-  Brown, John
-  Colfax, Schuyler
-  Constitutional amendments, fifteenth
-  Davis, Henry Winter
-  Delany, Martin Robinson
-  Douglass, Frederick
-  Grant, Ulysses S., presidency
-  Masons
-  Plantations and planters
-  Revels, Hiram
-  Slaves and slavery
-  Stevens, Thaddeus
-  Sumner, Charles, as champion of equal rights
-  Voters and voting
Format Headings
Lithographs--1870.
Notes
-  Title from item.
-  "Entered ... 1870 A.D. by Metcalf & Clark ... Washington."
-  Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1870-2.
Medium
1 print on wove paper : lithograph ; image 48 x 62.6 cm.
Call Number/Physical Location
PGA - Metcalf & Clark--Result of the Fifteenth... (D size) [P&P]
Repository
Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
Digital Id
pga 02178 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pga.02178
cph 3g04658 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3g04658
cph 3a33279 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a33279
Library of Congress Control Number
2003690775
Reproduction Number
LC-DIG-pga-02178 (digital file from original print) LC-USZC4-4658 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-32761 (b&w film copy neg.)
Rights Advisory
No known restrictions on publication.
Online Format
image
Description
1 print on wove paper : lithograph ; image 48 x 62.6 cm. | One of several large commemorative prints marking the enactment on March 30, 1870, of the Fifteenth Amendment, and showing the parade celebrating it which was held in Baltimore on May 19 the same year. The amendment declared that the right to vote "shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude." Here the parade winds down Monument Street from Baltimore's Washington Monument. In the left distance is the spire of the First Presbyterian Church. Heading the parade are a small troop of black Zouaves, holding rifles across their shoulders. They are followed by several men on horseback wearing top hats and sashes, several floats, and more soldiers. The sidewalks are lined with onlookers, many of them black. Framing the central image are a series of vignettes. At left are portrait busts of the late Pennsylvania representative and champion of black suffrage Thaddeus Stevens, Maryland representative Henry Winter Davis, author of the Wade-Davis Bill, and Massachusetts senator Charles Sumner. At right are busts of distinguished blacks Martin Robinson Delany, Frederick Douglass, and Hiram R. Revels. In the upper left corner of the print is an antebellum plantation scene, where a mustachioed overseer supervises slaves picking cotton. Nearby is an elegant house surrounded by palm trees. Beneath the scene are the words, "We are in bondage. O deliver us!" In contrast, the right hand corner holds a Civil War scene of black troops rushing into battle, with the words "We fought for Liberty, we now enjoy" below. In the center, above the parade scene, appear busts of (left to right) Lincoln, Baltimore jurist Hugh Lennox Bond, abolitionist martyr John Brown, Vice president Schuyler Colfax, and President Ulysses S. Grant. The three busts in the center rest on crossed laurel branches and flags. In the lower corners stand two parade groups of black men wearing Masonic sashes and aprons. They carry banners decorated with allegorical figures as well as the portraits of Lincoln, Grant, and Swiss patriot William Tell and his son. Between these groups are two small scenes: a black schoolroom with the words "Education will be our pride," and a black preacher before his congregation, with the words, "The day of Jubilee has come."
LCCN Permalink
https://lccn.loc.gov/2003690775
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MODS Record
Dublin Core Record

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  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
  • Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-pga-02178 (digital file from original print) LC-USZC4-4658 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-32761 (b&w film copy neg.)
  • Call Number: PGA - Metcalf & Clark--Result of the Fifteenth... (D size) [P&P]
  • Access Advisory: ---

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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Metcalf & Clark. The result of the Fifteenth Amendment, and the rise and progress of the African race in America and its final accomplishment, and celebration on May 19th, A.D. , ca. 1870. [Baltimore: Published by Metcalf & Clark, 687 W. Baltimore St] Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2003690775/.

APA citation style:

Metcalf & Clark. (ca. 1870) The result of the Fifteenth Amendment, and the rise and progress of the African race in America and its final accomplishment, and celebration on May 19th, A.D. , ca. 1870. [Baltimore: Published by Metcalf & Clark, 687 W. Baltimore St] [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2003690775/.

MLA citation style:

Metcalf & Clark. The result of the Fifteenth Amendment, and the rise and progress of the African race in America and its final accomplishment, and celebration on May 19th, A.D. [Baltimore: Published by Metcalf & Clark, 687 W. Baltimore St] Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2003690775/>.