Photo, Print, Drawing For President Horace Greeley of New York and for Vice President Benjn. Gratz. Brown / Henry Brueckner painted ; lith. by S[vobodin] Merinsky.

[ digital file from original print ]

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[ b&w film copy neg. ]

About this Item

Title
For President Horace Greeley of New York and for Vice President Benjn. Gratz. Brown / Henry Brueckner painted ; lith. by S[vobodin] Merinsky.
Summary
Print shows an unusually elaborate and imaginative campaign banner for Liberal Republican-Democratic presidential candidate Horace Greeley. The print contrasts scenes of war and mayhem from Ulysses S. Grant's past as a Civil War general (right) to the world of letters, peace, and progress supposedly fostered by New York "Tribune editor Greeley (left). Wearing his trademark white coat and spectacles, Greeley appears in the foreground of a crowded urban scene, where newsboys--black and white--hawk the "Tribune," an orator preaches from a pulpit, and Indians, Irishmen, and a range of other peoples mingle. Smoking factory chimneys, churches, and telegraph wires stretch into the distance. Liberty or Columbia, accompanied by an American eagle, hovers above the city holding a laurel crown. At the top of the print is a bust portrait of George Washington, flanked by medallions of the seal of the United States. On either side fly streamers with the seals of the states. Below, in the center of the picture, are streamers with Democratic mottoes "Universal Amnesty, Liberty, Equality, Fraternity and Impartial Suffrage." Below that appear the words "The Pen is mightier than the Sword" with a crossed pen and sword. The saying "Be it Peace! And the Sword Has to Cease" which appears below this slogan is a play on Ulysses S. Grant's campaign slogan, "Let us have peace." At lower left is a small bust portrait of Greeley, on the right one of his running mate Benjamin Gratz Brown, and in the center a portrait of Abraham Lincoln. On the ground near the Lincoln portrait are attributes of the editor--a valise, a pen, books, and a newspaper, and (on the right) those of the soldier Grant--cannon shot and a broken saber. Below are the words: "In The Beginning Was the Word Then Followed the War. Yet We Shall Seal the Peace." In the lower margin is inscribed "No. 9. Original Composition."
Contributor Names
Merinsky, Svobodin.
Brueckner, Henry, artist
Created / Published
[New York] : Composed, lithographed, printed & published at Merinskys's Establishment, 319 Pearl St., New York, c1872.
Subject Headings
-  Washington, George,--1732-1799
-  Lincoln, Abraham,--1809-1865
-  Greeley, Horace,--1811-1872
-  Brown, B. Gratz--(Benjamin Gratz),--1826-1885
-  Liberal Republican Party
-  Political campaigns--United States--1870-1880
-  Presidential elections--United States--1870-1880
-  Liberty--1870-1880
-  Journalists--United States--1870-1880
-  Soldiers--United States--1870-1880
-  United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
Format Headings
Lithographs--1870-1880.
Portrait prints--1870-1880.
Genre
Broadsides--1870-1880
Lithographs--1870-1880
Notes
-  Title from item.
-  Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1872-5.
Medium
1 print on wove paper : lithograph ; image 40.8 x 48.1 cm.
Call Number/Physical Location
PGA - Merinsky--For President... (C size) [P&P]
Source Collection
Popular graphic art print filing series (Library of Congress)
Repository
Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
Digital Id
pga 03970 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pga.03970
cph 3a09843 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a09843
Library of Congress Control Number
2003690778
Reproduction Number
LC-DIG-pga-03970 (digital file from original print) LC-USZ62-7191 (b&w film copy neg.)
Rights Advisory
No known restrictions on publication.
Language
English
Online Format
image
Description
Print shows an unusually elaborate and imaginative campaign banner for Liberal Republican-Democratic presidential candidate Horace Greeley. The print contrasts scenes of war and mayhem from Ulysses S. Grant's past as a Civil War general (right) to the world of letters, peace, and progress supposedly fostered by New York Tribune editor Greeley (left). Wearing his trademark white coat and spectacles, Greeley appears in the foreground of a crowded urban scene, where newsboys--black and white--hawk the "Tribune," an orator preaches from a pulpit, and Indians, Irishmen, and a range of other peoples mingle. Smoking factory chimneys, churches, and telegraph wires stretch into the distance. Liberty or Columbia, accompanied by an American eagle, hovers above the city holding a laurel crown. At the top of the print is a bust portrait of George Washington, flanked by medallions of the seal of the United States. On either side fly streamers with the seals of the states. Below, in the center of the picture, are streamers with Democratic mottoes "Universal Amnesty, Liberty, Equality, Fraternity and Impartial Suffrage." Below that appear the words "The Pen is mightier than the Sword" with a crossed pen and sword. The saying "Be it Peace! And the Sword Has to Cease" which appears below this slogan is a play on Ulysses S. Grant's campaign slogan, "Let us have peace." At lower left is a small bust portrait of Greeley, on the right one of his running mate Benjamin Gratz Brown, and in the center a portrait of Abraham Lincoln. On the ground near the Lincoln portrait are attributes of the editor--a valise, a pen, books, and a newspaper, and (on the right) those of the soldier Grant--cannon shot and a broken saber. Below are the words: "In The Beginning Was the Word Then Followed the War. Yet We Shall Seal the Peace." In the lower margin is printed "No. 9. Original Composition."
LCCN Permalink
https://lccn.loc.gov/2003690778
Additional Metadata Formats
MARCXML Record
MODS Record
Dublin Core Record

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  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
  • Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-pga-03970 (digital file from original print) LC-USZ62-7191 (b&w film copy neg.)
  • Call Number: PGA - Merinsky--For President... (C size) [P&P]
  • Access Advisory: ---

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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Merinsky, Svobodin, and Henry Brueckner. For President Horace Greeley of New York and for Vice President Benjn. Gratz. Brown / Henry Brueckner painted ; lith. by Svobodin Merinsky. United States, ca. 1872. [New York: Composed, lithographed, printed & published at Merinskys's Establishment, 319 Pearl St., New York] Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2003690778/.

APA citation style:

Merinsky, S. & Brueckner, H. (ca. 1872) For President Horace Greeley of New York and for Vice President Benjn. Gratz. Brown / Henry Brueckner painted ; lith. by Svobodin Merinsky. United States, ca. 1872. [New York: Composed, lithographed, printed & published at Merinskys's Establishment, 319 Pearl St., New York] [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2003690778/.

MLA citation style:

Merinsky, Svobodin, and Henry Brueckner. For President Horace Greeley of New York and for Vice President Benjn. Gratz. Brown / Henry Brueckner painted ; lith. by Svobodin Merinsky. [New York: Composed, lithographed, printed & published at Merinskys's Establishment, 319 Pearl St., New York] Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2003690778/>.