Photo, Print, Drawing How Columbia receives McClellan's salutation from the Chicago platform.

[ digital file from b&w film copy neg. ]

About this Item

Title

  • How Columbia receives McClellan's salutation from the Chicago platform.

Summary

  • Columbia repudiates Democratic presidential candidate George Brinton McClellan's endorsement of the platform devised at the August 1864 Democratic convention in Chicago. McClellan and his running mate George Hunt Pendleton are shown standing on a platform labeled "Right of Secession. Anti Coercion. The War [...] a Crime and a Failure. Cessation of Hostilities. Pity (Not [...] Honor) for the Soldier", which is resting on (i.e., supported by) the shoulders of several Democrats--many of them New Yorkers. Pendleton stands at right, his thumbs in his lapels, boasting, "Little Mac's popularity will carry me in, all safe; and then, if he should happen, by any chance, to die before the 4th of March, or during his term of office,--'how are you Dixie?'--I will be President, and will make everything sweet for my Southern friends. They can count on me, however, in any event, and they know it." McClellan, standing at center, facing left, in uniform, raises his sword. "(Standing on his letter, with which he fancies he has concealed the Platform.) He salutes Columbia, courting her smiles; but is dismayed at her manner, and drops the copy of a set speech, which his friend Barlow had written for him, for presentation to her." Although McClellan ran on a peace plank, his letter accepting the Democratic nomination defended the war. Columbia says, "What a shame that a man who was educated at my expense, and whom I have since honored and petted, should have allowed himself to be allured by ambition into such company, and upon such a Platform! His Letter cannot conceal his real position, nor hide those odious 'planks;' neither can it reconcile me to his traitorous companions. I discard both him and them forever." Sixteen men support the Democratic platform on which McClellan and Pendleton stand. They are (clockwise from lower right): New York governor Horatio Seymour; former President Franklin Pierce; Clement Laird Vallandigham, author of the peace plank; New York congressman Fernando Wood, an organizer of the Peace Democrats; former President James Buchanan; C. Chauncey Burr; Maryland congressman Benjamin G. Harris; Ohio congressman Samuel Sullivan Cox; Indiana congressman Daniel W. Voorhees; banker August Belmont; "Judge Woodward"; Ohio congressman Alexander Long; James Brooks, publisher of the "New York Express"; Maryland senator Reverdy Johnson; New York congressman Benjamin Wood; and Isaiah Rynders.

Names

  • Printed Ephemera Collection (Library of Congress)

Created / Published

  • New York : [Publisher not identified], 1864.

Headings

  • -  McClellan, George B.--(George Brinton),--1826-1885
  • -  Pendleton, George H.--(George Hunt),--1825-1889
  • -  Belmont, August,--Sr.,--1813-1890
  • -  Brooks, James,--1810-1873
  • -  Buchanan, James,--1791-1868
  • -  Burr, C. Chauncey--(Charles Chauncey),--1817-1883
  • -  Cox, Samuel Sullivan,--1824-1889
  • -  Harris, Benjamin G.--(Benjamin Gwinn),--1806-1895
  • -  Johnson, Reverdy,--1796-1876
  • -  Long, Alexander,--1816-1886
  • -  Pierce, Franklin,--1804-1869
  • -  Rynders, Isaiah
  • -  Seymour, Horatio,--1810-1886
  • -  Vallandigham, Clement L.--(Clement Laird),--1820-1871
  • -  Voorhees, Daniel W.--(Daniel Wolsey),--1827-1897
  • -  Wood, Benjamin,--1820-1900
  • -  Wood, Fernando,--1812-1881
  • -  Woodward, George W.--(George Washington),--1809-1875
  • -  Democratic National Convention--(1864 :--Chicago, Ill.)
  • -  Columbia (Symbolic character)--1860-1870
  • -  Political platforms--1860-1870
  • -  Presidential elections--1860-1870
  • -  Criticism--1860-1870

Headings

  • Political cartoons--1860-1870.
  • Wood engravings--1860-1870.

Genre

  • Political cartoons--1860-1870
  • Wood engravings--1860-1870

Notes

  • -  Title from item.
  • -  The text below the picture provides the dialogue, descriptive notes, and identification of the main characters.
  • -  Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1864-21.
  • -  LAC knj 2021-04-22 update (1 card)

Medium

  • 1 print : wood-engraving with letterpress ; 18 x 19.7 cm. (image)

Call Number/Physical Location

  • Broadside Collection, portfolio 158, no. 31

Repository

Digital Id

  • cph 3a41121 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a41121

Library of Congress Control Number

  • 2008661664

Reproduction Number

  • LC-USZ62-40791 (b&w film copy neg.)

Rights Advisory

  • No known restrictions on publication.

Online Format

  • image

Additional Metadata Formats

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  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
  • Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-40791 (b&w film copy neg.)
  • Call Number: Broadside Collection, portfolio 158, no. 31
  • Access Advisory: ---

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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Printed Ephemera Collection. How Columbia receives McClellan's salutation from the Chicago platform. Chicago Illinois, 1864. [New York: Publisher not identified] Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2008661664/.

APA citation style:

Printed Ephemera Collection. (1864) How Columbia receives McClellan's salutation from the Chicago platform. Chicago Illinois, 1864. [New York: Publisher not identified] [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2008661664/.

MLA citation style:

Printed Ephemera Collection. How Columbia receives McClellan's salutation from the Chicago platform. [New York: Publisher not identified] Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2008661664/>.