Photo, Print, Drawing Hidalgo, Texas's, Killer Bee Statue, a nod to a historical moment in October 1990 when the first known swarm of these "Africanized" bees was documented to have crossed into the United States from Mexico and into this little Rio Grande River community in far-south Texas

[ original digital file ]

About this Item

Title
Hidalgo, Texas's, Killer Bee Statue, a nod to a historical moment in October 1990 when the first known swarm of these "Africanized" bees was documented to have crossed into the United States from Mexico and into this little Rio Grande River community in far-south Texas
Contributor Names
Highsmith, Carol M., 1946-, photographer
Created / Published
2014-03-14.
Subject Headings
-  United States--Texas--Hidalgo
-  America
-  Killer bee statue
-  Killer bees
Format Headings
Digital photographs--Color--2010-2020.
Notes
-  Title, date, and keywords based on information provided by the photographer.
-  Sculpted by Jerome Vettrus (Source: A comprehensive guide to outdoor sculpture in Texas, p. 246)
-  Rather than downplay this event as a smear on its reputation, Hildalgo spent $20,000 to erect a statue to the event and to even promote itself as the "Killer Bee Capital," not just of America but of the world! The town even named its arena-league football team called the "Rio Grande Valley Killer Bees." The statue, built largely of styrofoam was used as a float. It traveled all over Texas, attending parades and promoting Hidalgo, before settling down in Hidalgo as a fixed tourist attraction.
-  Credit line: The Lyda Hill Texas Collection of Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith's America Project, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.
-  Gift; The Lyda Hill Foundation; 2014; (DLC/PP-2014:054).
-  Forms part of: Lyda Hill Texas Collection of Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith's America Project in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive.
Medium
1 photograph : digital, tiff file, color.
Call Number/Physical Location
LC-DIG-highsm- 26239 (ONLINE) [P&P]
Source Collection
Highsmith, Carol M., 1946- Carol M. Highsmith Archive.
Repository
Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Digital Id
highsm 26239 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/highsm.26239
Library of Congress Control Number
2014630439
Reproduction Number
LC-DIG-highsm-26239 (original digital file)
Rights Advisory
No known restrictions on publication.
Language
English
Online Format
image
Description
1 photograph : digital, tiff file, color.
LCCN Permalink
https://lccn.loc.gov/2014630439
Additional Metadata Formats
MARCXML Record
MODS Record
Dublin Core Record
IIIF Presentation Manifest
Manifest (JSON/LD)

Rights & Access

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For information about reproducing, publishing, and citing material from this collection, as well as access to the original items, see: Carol M. Highsmith - Rights and Restrictions Information

  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
  • Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-highsm-26239 (original digital file)
  • Call Number: LC-DIG-highsm- 26239 (ONLINE) [P&P]
  • Access Advisory: ---

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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Highsmith, Carol M, photographer. Hidalgo, Texas's, Killer Bee Statue, a nod to a historical moment in Octoberwhen the first known swarm of these "Africanized" bees was documented to have crossed into the United States from Mexico and into this little Rio Grande River community in far-south Texas. Hidalgo Texas United States, 2014. -03-14. Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2014630439/.

APA citation style:

Highsmith, C. M., photographer. (2014) Hidalgo, Texas's, Killer Bee Statue, a nod to a historical moment in Octoberwhen the first known swarm of these "Africanized" bees was documented to have crossed into the United States from Mexico and into this little Rio Grande River community in far-south Texas. Hidalgo Texas United States, 2014. -03-14. [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2014630439/.

MLA citation style:

Highsmith, Carol M, photographer. Hidalgo, Texas's, Killer Bee Statue, a nod to a historical moment in Octoberwhen the first known swarm of these "Africanized" bees was documented to have crossed into the United States from Mexico and into this little Rio Grande River community in far-south Texas. -03-14. Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2014630439/>.