Photo, Print, Drawing [Emily Howland photograph album]

[ digital files from original album ]

About this Item

Title
[Emily Howland photograph album]
Summary
Photograph album with portraits of Harriet Tubman, John Willis Menard, and others.
Contributor Names
Howland, Emily, 1827-1929, collector
Lacy, Caroline N., 1838-1898, inscriber
Created / Published
[ca 1861-ca.1880]
Notes
-  Title devised by Library staff.
-  An inscription located on the front flyleaf reads: "To Miss Emily Howland, from her Friend Carrie Nichols, January 1st, 1864, Camp Todd, Virginia."
-  Album most likely presented to Emily Howland by her friend Caroline N. Lacy (1838-1898) who was working at Camp Todd, Virginia during the time Howland was there. Lacy's portrait appears on p. 13 of the album.
-  Includes 43 albumen cartes de visite, 4 tintypes with paper frames mounted into album pages and 1 matte collodion print (depicting Harriet Tubman) loosely inserted at the back of the album.
-  Album has gauffered edges and two buckle clasps. Covers are leather on embossed boards.
-  This album is owned jointly by the Library of Congress and the National Museum of African American History, Smithsonian Institution.
-  Emily Howland (1827-1929) was born near Sherwood, New York, to Quaker parents Slocum and Hannah Howland. Her lifelong activism was formed early on by the influences of her abolitionist parents. Slocum Howland used the family home in upstate New York as a waystation on the Underground Railroad. Emily's eagerness to contribute to the welfare of African Americans brought her to Washington, D.C., in the late 1850s, where at age 30, she began teaching at Myrtilla Miner's school for African American girls. From 1864 to 1867 she volunteered at freedmen's camps near Washington, D.C., nursing and teaching former slaves. This experience led her to purchase property at Heathsville, Virginia where she offered land to newly freed families and built a school within the community. The Howland Chapel School, opened in 1867, existed, with her unwavering support and the efforts of the local African American residents, until it was subsumed under Virginia's public school system. The building is registered as one of Virginia's historic landmarks.
-  Purchase; Swann Galleries; 2017; (DLC/PP-2017:061).
Medium
1 album (48 photographs)
Call Number/Physical Location
LOT 15020 (DAG)
Repository
Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Digital Id
ppmsca 54604 //www.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.54604
Library of Congress Control Number
2017656258
Reproduction Number
LC-DIG-ppmsca-54604 (digital files from original album)
Rights Advisory
No known restrictions on publication.
Access Advisory
Please use digital images in the online catalog to preserve the fragile album. Digital images of each album page along with associated identifying information are available online.
Online Format
image
Description
1 album (48 photographs) | Photograph album with portraits of Harriet Tubman, John Willis Menard, and others.
LCCN Permalink
https://lccn.loc.gov/2017656258
Additional Metadata Formats
MARCXML Record
MODS Record
Dublin Core Record

Rights & Access

Rights assessment is your responsibility.

The Library of Congress generally does not own rights to material in its collections and, therefore, cannot grant or deny permission to publish or otherwise distribute the material. For information about assessing rights, see the Rights and Restrictions Information page.

  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
  • Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-54604 (digital files from original album)
  • Call Number: LOT 15020 (DAG)
  • Access Advisory: Please use digital images in the online catalog to preserve the fragile album. Digital images of each album page along with associated identifying information are available online.

Obtaining Copies

Generally, catalog records for Groups of Images in High Demand describe multiple items, from which a selection must be made. The individual items in the group may or may not be represented online.

  1. 1. Determine whether the desired materials can be retrieved online.
    • Select the "About this Item" tab
    • Select the "Check for online items from this group" link
    • Select the "Obtaining Copies" tab for any retrieved items that are of interest.
  2. 2. If the desired material cannot be retrieved online:
    Select images for reproduction through one of these methods:
    • Visit the Prints & Photographs Reading Room and request to view the group (general information about service in the reading room is available at: http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/info/001_ref.html). OR
    • P&P reading room staff can provide up to 15 quick copies of items per calendar year (but many original items are too old or fragile to make such copies). For assistance, see our Ask a Librarian page. OR
    • Hire a freelance researcher to do further selection for you (a list of researchers is available at: http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/resource/013_pic.html).

Access to Originals

Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

  1. Is the item digitized? (A thumbnail (small) image will be visible on the left.)

    • Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.
      As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)
    • No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.
  2. Do the Access Advisory or Call Number fields above indicate that a non-digital surrogate exists, such as microfilm or copy prints?

    • Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.
    • No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.
  3. If you do not see a thumbnail image or a reference to another surrogate, please fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room. In many cases, the originals can be served in a few minutes. Other materials require appointments for later the same day or in the future. Reference staff can advise you in both how to fill out a call slip and when the item can be served.

To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.

Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Howland, Emily, Collector, and Caroline N Lacy. Emily Howland photograph album. , None. [ca 1861-ca.1880] Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2017656258/.

APA citation style:

Howland, E. & Lacy, C. N. Emily Howland photograph album. , None. [ca 1861-ca.1880] [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2017656258/.

MLA citation style:

Howland, Emily, Collector, and Caroline N Lacy. Emily Howland photograph album. [ca 1861-ca.1880] Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2017656258/>.