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Book/Printed Material Resilience, adaptive peacebuilding and transitional justice : how societies recover after collective violence

About this Item

Title

  • Resilience, adaptive peacebuilding and transitional justice : how societies recover after collective violence

Summary

  • "When referring to biological, psychological, social and institutional aspects of people's lives, the term resilience is best used to describe processes whereby individuals interact with their environments in ways that facilitate positive psychological, physical and social development. While earlier definitions emphasised individual traits and the invulnerability of individuals who coped well with adversity (Anthony and Cohler, 1987), more contextualised research has challenged the neo-liberal bias of these earlier studies (Sanders et al., 2015). When resilience was described as a trait, even if those traits were malleable, the implication was that individuals had the responsibility to develop the qualities necessary for optimal development, whether physical, psychological or social (like attachments). Resilience as a process, however, shifts the focus from individual responsibility for change to the interactions between individuals and their environments (Birgden, 2015; Ungar, 2015). The environment, whether referring to legal institutions, community services or the availability of intimate bonds and other antecedents of mental health (e.g., a sense of coherence [Antonovsky, 1996; Mittelmark et al., 2017]), combines to provide individuals with the internal and external resources necessary to cope with exceptional and uncommon stressors. For this reason, when resilience is understood as a process involving multiple systems, the responsibility for optimal functioning (whether psychological wellbeing or peace and security) under stress is shared across many different systems and at different scales (Ungar, 2018)"-- Provided by publisher.

Names

  • Clark, Janine N. (Janine Natalya), editor
  • Ungar, Michael, 1963- editor

Created / Published

  • Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2021.

Headings

  • -  Atrocities--Psychological aspects
  • -  Ethnic conflict--Psychological aspects
  • -  Peace-building
  • -  Resilience (Personality trait)--Social aspects
  • -  Transitional justice
  • -  Victims of violent crime--Psychology
  • -  LAW / General

Notes

  • -  Includes index.
  • -  Description based on print version record and CIP data provided by publisher; resource not viewed.

Medium

  • 1 online resource

Call Number/Physical Location

  • HM1116

Digital Id

Library of Congress Control Number

  • 2021028140

Rights Advisory

Access Advisory

  • Unrestricted online access

Online Format

  • image
  • pdf

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Rights & Access

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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Ungar, Michael, Editor. Resilience, Adaptive Peacebuilding and Transitional Justice: How Societies Recover After Collective Violence. editeds by Clark, Janine N. Itor Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2021. Pdf. https://www.loc.gov/item/2021028140/.

APA citation style:

Ungar, M., Clark, J. N. I., ed. (2021) Resilience, Adaptive Peacebuilding and Transitional Justice: How Societies Recover After Collective Violence. Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. [Pdf] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2021028140/.

MLA citation style:

Ungar, Michael, Editor. Resilience, Adaptive Peacebuilding and Transitional Justice: How Societies Recover After Collective Violence. ed by Clark, Janine N. Itor Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2021. Pdf. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2021028140/>.