Map Brazil, which Coast is a Portuguese Possession, Divided into Fourteen Captaincies, Showing the Middle of the Country Inhabited by Many Unknown Peoples. Le Bresil, dont la Coste est possedée par les Portugais et divisée en quatorze Capitanieres, le Milieu du Pays est habité par un trés grand Nombre de Peuples presque tous Incogneus

About this Item

Title

  • Brazil, which Coast is a Portuguese Possession, Divided into Fourteen Captaincies, Showing the Middle of the Country Inhabited by Many Unknown Peoples.

Other Title

  • Le Bresil, dont la Coste est possedée par les Portugais et divisée en quatorze Capitanieres, le Milieu du Pays est habité par un trés grand Nombre de Peuples presque tous Incogneus

Summary

  • This coastal map of Portuguese Brazil is by one of the greatest of the French cartographers, Nicolas Sanson (1600-67). Sanson gave geography lessons to both King Louis XIII and King Louis XIV. He also was named official geographer to the king, and his two younger sons succeeded him in this position. Until Sanson, the field of cartography was dominated by the Dutch, whose maps favored aesthetics over exactness. Sanson's maps, notable for accuracy as well as elegance, marked a shift in the dominance of the field of cartography from the Netherlands to France, one that coincided with the decline of Dutch naval prominence and the rise of France as a world power. Unlike the earlier Dutch maps, Sanson's maps focused heavily on coastlines and continental boundaries.

Names

  • Sanson, Nicolas, 1600-1667 Creator.

Created / Published

  • Paris : Chez Pierre Mariette, 1656.

Headings

  • -  Brazil
  • -  1656
  • -  Indians of South America
  • -  Indigenous peoples
  • -  Jesuits
  • -  Missions

Notes

  • -  Title devised, in English, by Library staff.
  • -  Original resource extent: 1 hand colored map ; 39 x 54 centimeters.
  • -  Original resource at: National Library of Brazil.
  • -  Content in French.
  • -  Description based on data extracted from World Digital Library, which may be extracted from partner institutions.

Medium

  • 1 online resource.

Digital Id

Library of Congress Control Number

  • 2021668385

Online Format

  • compressed data
  • image

Additional Metadata Formats

IIIF Presentation Manifest

Rights & Access

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Credit Line: [Original Source citation], World Digital Library

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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Sanson, Nicolas, Creator. Brazil, which Coast is a Portuguese Possession, Divided into Fourteen Captaincies, Showing the Middle of the Country Inhabited by Many Unknown Peoples. Paris: Chez Pierre Mariette, 1656. Map. https://www.loc.gov/item/2021668385/.

APA citation style:

Sanson, N. (1656) Brazil, which Coast is a Portuguese Possession, Divided into Fourteen Captaincies, Showing the Middle of the Country Inhabited by Many Unknown Peoples. Paris: Chez Pierre Mariette. [Map] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2021668385/.

MLA citation style:

Sanson, Nicolas, Creator. Brazil, which Coast is a Portuguese Possession, Divided into Fourteen Captaincies, Showing the Middle of the Country Inhabited by Many Unknown Peoples. Paris: Chez Pierre Mariette, 1656. Map. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2021668385/>.