Audio Recording Interview with Denis and Margie Dennehy about teaching Irish dance in Chicago, Illinois, part 1

About this Item

Title
Interview with Denis and Margie Dennehy about teaching Irish dance in Chicago, Illinois, part 1
Contributor Names
Moloney, Mick, 1944- (Collector)
Dennehy, Denis (Interviewee)
Dennehy, Margie (Interviewee)
Created / Published
Chicago, Illinois, May 5, 1977
Subject Headings
-  Irish Americans
-  Ethnography
-  Interviews
-  Illinois -- Chicago
Genre
Ethnography
Interviews
Notes
-  Denis & Margie Dennehy, part 1
-  Part 1 of 2-part interview with Denis and Margie Dennehy about teaching Irish dance in Chicago, history and methods; topics include how Denis Dennehy started dancing, when, who he learned from; how many dancing schools were around in the early l950's, how many pupils; how many others danced and/or played music in his family, how much travelling, hbw many competitions, contrasted with present; about other contexts for dancing in the past; about the kinds of costumes; change over time; about Denis Dennehy’s own success in competitions, about the problems male dancers faced from peers; how Denis Dennehy started his own school, with his wife Margie, how Margie started with Pat Roche; about Margie Dennehy’s own Irish background; Margie's and Denis’s roles in the school; about their school today, when held, where , how many pupils, ages, gender distribution; about teaching methods, how long for a course, where the students come from, which generation (from immigrant) are they. how information about the school is disseminated, the problems with crowded classes; about other Irish dancing schools in Chicago, availability of qualified teachers, how credentials are established, the nature of examinations; the Irish Dancing Commission tests for adjudicators (contest judges); about different kinds of competitions, qualification procedures for regional, national, world championships; about adjudicators in Chicago; about the teachers' and chidrens’ awareness of standards, qualification procedures; about the children dancing in Chicago, the initial motivations of children and their parents, what age they start, how long children keep up with dancing; about dance style, nature of steps , change over time, the development of more stylized routines, steps are becoming more complex; about who decides what's good and why, where aesthetic norms come from. "Norms are set by the successful”; novelty in dance and its limits; genius; introduction of ballet-like steps to girl’s dancing, how standards are set back in Ireland and emulated in America.
Medium
audiocassette, C-60
Call Number/Physical Location
Call number: AFC 1981/004: AFS 20580a
MBRS Shelflist: RYA 0642
Field Project Identifier: CH77-T057-C
Source Collection
Chicago Ethnic Arts Project collection (AFC 1981/004)
Repository
American Folklife Center
Online Format
audio

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Credit line

Chicago Ethnic Arts Project collection (AFC 1981/004), American Folklife Center, Library of Congress

Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Moloney, Mick, Denis Dennehy, and Margie Dennehy. Interview with Denis and Margie Dennehy about teaching Irish dance in Chicago, Illinois, part 1. Chicago, Illinois, May 5, 1977. Audio. https://www.loc.gov/item/afc1981004_afs20580a/.

APA citation style:

Moloney, M., Dennehy, D. & Dennehy, M. (1977) Interview with Denis and Margie Dennehy about teaching Irish dance in Chicago, Illinois, part 1. Chicago, Illinois, May 5. [Audio] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/afc1981004_afs20580a/.

MLA citation style:

Moloney, Mick, Denis Dennehy, and Margie Dennehy. Interview with Denis and Margie Dennehy about teaching Irish dance in Chicago, Illinois, part 1. Chicago, Illinois, May 5, 1977. Audio. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/afc1981004_afs20580a/>.