U.S. Citizen Junior Fellows Summer Internship Program

  • Hosting Service Unit: All Library of Congress
  • Program Contact: juniorfellows@loc.gov
  • Interests/Areas of Study: STEM; Collections Conservation and Preservation; Law; Business; Humanities, Art and Culture; Library Information Science; Communications; Chemistry and Science; Congressional Relations; Geography and Maps; Government and Business Administration; Information Technology; Legislative Information; Policy Analysis; Public Relations; Cataloguing; Copyright; Digital Stewardship; Education; Finance; Outreach; Project & Project Management; Research; Web Services
  • Citizenship: U.S. Citizen
  • Application Period: Annually
  • Application Notes: See below for: A. General FAQ on all the programs available at the Library; B. Specific FAQ on the Junior Fellows Program; C. Specific information on the program including project descriptions D. <a href="https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/550595900">Apply for the 2020 internship at USAJobs in November 2019</a>.
  • Compensation: $4,500.00 (taxable income of $450.00 per week)
  • Academic Credit: The Library does not provide academic credit, but you may arrange with your school in advance to receive credit.
  • Available Benefits: Transit. LC Internal Discounts.
  • Program Duration: Short-term. May 26, 2020 – July 31, 2020
  • Qualifications: Currently Enrolled Students (Undergraduate, Graduate) or have graduated in the months of December 2019 - June 2020
  • Frequently Asked Questions

Please see below for the following information on the program:

Program Overview

The Library of Congress Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program enables undergraduate and graduate students to experience the integrated analog and digital collections and services of the world's largest, all-inclusive library. Working under the direction of Library curators and specialists in various divisions, fellows explore digital initiatives and increase access to the institution’s unparalleled collections and resources. Fellows are exposed to a broad spectrum of library work: copyright, preservation, reference, access, and information technology. In the past, summer fellows have identified hundreds of historical, literary, artistic, cinematic and musical gems representing the Library’s rich cultural, creative and intellectual assets. No previous experience is necessary, but fellowships are competitive and special skills or knowledge are usually desired. Selections are based on academic achievement, reference calls, and an interview with a selection official

Program Focus

The focus of the program is to increase access to special, legal and copyright collections, and to promote awareness and appreciation of the Library's services to researchers including Congressional members, scholars, students, teachers, and the general public. Fellows encourage the use of collections and services − ensuring that the Library of Congress is known as a living, dynamic center for scholarly work and connections. Program participants inventory, catalog, arrange, preserve, and research collections in varied formats, as well as assist in digital library initiatives. Upon completion of their assignments, fellows work closely with Library curators and specialists to plan and present a display of their most significant discoveries and accomplishments.

The Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program is made possible by a generous gift from James Madison Council member Nancy Glanville Jewell through the Glanville Family Foundation and from the Knowledge Navigators Trust Fund, which was established with a lead gift from H. F. (Gerry) Lenfest, former chairman of the Madison Council, and with major support provided by members of the Council. The program was originally made possible through the generosity of the late Mrs. Jefferson Patterson.

The Junior Fellows Program offers a paid ten week internship for undergraduate and graduate students working with Library of Congress collections. The fellows explore digital initiatives and inventory, catalog, arrange, preserve and research a backlog of special, legal or copyright collections in many different formats.

 

Applications for the 2020 Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program will be available November 1, 2019 through December 20, 2019 on USAJOBS.gov: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/550595900. Incomplete application packages will not be considered.

Selection Process

Applications will be forwarded to selecting officials in the Library who will arrange telephone interviews with promising applicants, based on materials submitted. After completion of the selection process those selected will be provided with detailed information on reporting for their fellowship.

The Library of Congress is an equal opportunity employer. Women, minorities, and persons with disabilities who meet eligibility requirements are strongly encouraged to apply.

Projects for 2020

 

Project Descriptions

Junior Fellows 2020 Projects

  • #01 – Audio Engagement Fellow Hispanic and Indigenous Languages (Hispanic Division)

    Short Description: Hispanic Division curates and produces two audio resources: an archive of Caribbean, Latin American, Iberian and Hispanic or Portuguese heritage authors reading from their works; and podcast featuring collections and services for people interested in the Caribbean, Latin America, Iberia and Hispanic or Lusophone Studies. In consultation with the mentor, successful interns will design and/or implement projects that expand the reach of our audio resources.

    Full Description: Hispanic Division curates and produces two audio resources: an archive of Caribbean, Latin American, Iberian and Hispanic or Portuguese heritage authors reading from their works; and podcast featuring collections and services for people interested in the Caribbean, Latin America, Iberia and Hispanic or Lusophone Studies. Public engagement with these resources can take several forms including but not limited to: 1) coordinated crowdsourcing initiatives for Mayan and Mapuche metadata; 2) collaborative digital humanities project development, assigning and collecting classroom-generated transcriptions, biographies, and metadata; 3) Podcast planning, production, and outreach. Each of these options enables the Hispanic Division to engage learners in designing online experiences that expand the reach of our services to communities less-commonly served onsite at the Library of Congress. In consultation with the mentor, successful interns will design and/or implement projects that expand the reach of our audio resources.

    Required Skills: Knowledge or familiarity with one or more Caribbean or Latin American languages (reading required, writing and speaking preferred), experience with metadata, transcription and writing, willingness to learn audio production and promotion.

    Preferred Skills: Knowledge of Mayan languages and/or Mapuche; audio archives podcast development.

  • #02 – Visualizing and Mapping Hispanic Collections and Services (Hispanic Division)

    Short description: Hispanic Division services connects LC-wide collections and services with literary artists from the Caribbean, Latin America, Iberia and Hispanic or Lusophone cultures elsewhere; and educators and learners working in/on the Caribbean, Latin America, Iberia and Hispanic or Lusophone Studies.

    Full description: Using a creative process, the fellow will develop a visualization that demonstrates a flow of Caribbean, Latin American, Iberian and Hispanic or Lusophone heritage studies into and out of the Library of Congress. Hispanic Division services (both digital and physical) draw from and contribute to others across the Library of Congress. They also connect LC-wide collections and services with: 1) Literary artists from the Caribbean, Latin America, Iberia and Hispanic or Lusophone cultures elsewhere; and 2) Educators and learners working in/on the Caribbean, Latin America, Iberia and Hispanic or Lusophone Studies. Mapping these connections in a visualization as proposed here helps internal and external stakeholders see important “Hispanic Collections” networks across LC, and beyond. Most importantly, visualizing these connections helps our division design informed onsite and online experiences that speak directly to user interests. The more our core user and producer groups: Congress, Creators, Learners, and Connectors, see themselves and their constituencies in visualizations that highlight connections between their work and our collections and/or services, the easier our path toward ensuring increased accessibility. Using a creative process, the fellow will develop a visualization that demonstrates a flow of Caribbean, Latin American, Iberian and Hispanic or Lusophone heritage studies into and out of the Library of Congress.

    Required Skills: Knowledge or familiarity with one or more Caribbean or Latin American languages (reading required, writing and speaking preferred), experience with visualization tools, library research and diverse electronic formats.

    Preferred Skills: Knowledge of library science, organizational design; experience with researching Caribbean, Latin America, Spain, Portugal and Latinx communities and coding.

  • #03 – Trade Beads: Commodity and Currency (Science, Business & Technology)

    Short Description: Beads are considered an arbitrary unit of exchange in several cultures and can represent actual capital wealth. The Library’s collections contain a significant amount of material on early trading as evidenced by economic development in several parts of the world. Working under the direction of a senior librarian, the Fellow will examine Library materials as they relate to the use of beads in trade.

    Full Description: Trade is a staple of an economy. Beads are considered an ‘arbitrary unit of exchange in several cultures and can represent actual capital wealth. The Library’s collections contain a significant amount of material on early trading as evidenced by economic development in several parts of the world. For this project the Fellow will focus on the history of trade, business and commerce along the trade routes of North Africa. Working under the direction of a senior librarian, the Fellow will examine Library materials as they relate to the use of beads in trade; as well as online resources as they relate to beads, transactions and other instruments of commerce with emphasis on the identification of trade routes where beads were used, and prepare a guide to selected holdings of the library in support of this topic. The project is collections oriented in that the Fellow will not only use the resources of Science, Business & Technology on business, economics, money and banking; but those of other divisions as the need arises—e.g. African and Middle East Division. The Fellow will use onsite as well as online resources as they relate to beads, transactions and other instruments of commerce with emphasis on the identification of trade routes where beads were used, and prepare a guide to selected holdings of the library in support of this topic. It is service oriented in that the guide created will increase patron access to these materials.

    Required Skills:  Knowledge/background in business, economic and/or art history; ability to develop PowerPoint presentations, read in cross curriculum areas, meet production goals on weekly basis and produce a research guide for reference.

    Preferred Skills: Knowledge of at least one foreign language and Chicago Style citation format.

  • #04 – History of African American Business and Entrepreneurship (Science, Business & Technology)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will assist in developing a resource documenting materials in the Library of Congress collections relating to African American business and entrepreneurship.

    Full Description: The Junior Fellow will assist in developing a resource documenting materials in the Library of Congress collections relating to African American business and entrepreneurship. The Science, Technology & Business Division has two existing library guides from 2000 that need to be updated into the LibGuide format. The Junior Fellow would review the material listed in these guides and assist in evaluating the resources, reviewing any existing bibliographic citations and abstracts, and would locate additional resources in the Library of Congress collections to assist in developing a more robust product that includes up-to-date monographs and electronic resources. This project is both collections-oriented and services-oriented. In addition, the Junior Fellow may be able to update an existing book list that could be used in a library display, and could write a blog that would advertise the new LibGuide when it is released.

    Required Skills: Ability to communicate effectively both verbally and in writing; analyze materials; plan, organize, and execute work within specified deadlines; use computerized search tools, databases, and functions.

    Preferred Skills: Knowledge of African American History.

  • #05 – African Poster Collection (African and Middle Eastern Division)

    Short description: Around 700 posters are available to researchers but retrieval of the requested subject or country, is achieved with a great deal of difficulty. The Junior Fellows Project would provide ease of access to the poster collection physically and would provide an accompanying finding aid.

    Full description: The African Section of AMED has custody of a rich and vast collection of material amassed over the last 60 years. It is broadly called the “The African Section Pamphlet Collection,” and sections of it were cataloged in the 1990s. This is a collection of ephemera in the form of non-published materials, documents, government reports, press clippings, calendars, language publications, sample serials, scrapbooks, postcards, memorabilia, conference papers and university publications. This collection also includes material from elections, campaigning and US presidential visits to Africa. For accessibility and security of the collections, African Section staff has gradually compiled searchable inventories to categories of material. The inventories are greatly appreciated by researchers because they can peruse the lists and identify and request materials. One of the categories of material in the African Section Pamphlet Collection is posters from Africa, also amassed since the 1960’s. Although rich in subject content, these posters were outside of collecting scope for the Prints and Photographs Division and were therefore placed in the African Section. Around 700 posters are available to researchers but retrieval of the requested subject or country, is achieved with a great deal of difficulty. The Junior Fellows Project would provide ease of access to the poster collection physically and would provide an accompanying finding aid.

    Required Skills: Excellent organizational skills, ability to use MS Excel and Adobe Photoshop.

    Preferred Skills: Background in African studies and/or history, and general computer skills.

  • #06 – Soviet Serials Collection (European Division)

    Short description: The Soviet Serials Collection consists of early periodicals published in the Soviet Union roughly between 1920 and 1940. The Junior Fellow will conduct an inventory of the collection by creating an electronic document describing the title and issue numbers for each periodical.

    Full description: The Soviet Serials Collection consists of early periodicals published in the Soviet Union roughly between 1920 and 1940. The periodicals cover all subject areas with scientific and technical topics being heavily represented. The collection also includes a small number of pre-Revolutionary journals from the late 1890s to the 1910s. The periodicals are on Deck 13, Jefferson Building, and occupy 15 shelves, about 1,000 issues. The Junior Fellow will conduct an inventory of the collection by creating an electronic document describing the title and issue numbers for each periodical. The Junior Fellow will search the LC’s OPAC to confirm if any issues of the periodicals are duplicate copies of what the Library already has in its collections. The project is collections-oriented with the goal of transferring the periodicals to the general collection and identifying any surplus copies. The Junior Fellow should have a basic reading knowledge of Russian, and ideally will be in a library science program. The project involves a European Division mentor (permanent staff Reference Librarian) for learning Soviet and Russian print culture and selecting items for the display.

    Required Skills: Knowledge/background in Russian language, literature, history and/or culture; ability to communicate clearly in English both verbally and in writing, experience with library research and attention to detail.

    Preferred Skill: Knowledge of transliteration scheme for rendering Russian Cyrillic into Latin letters, experience with searching online catalogs and library collections processing.

  • #07 – Project Not Available. Do not apply to this project.
  • #08 – Burmese Rare Collection Management (Asian Division)

    Short description: The Southeast Asia Collection has over 130 uncatalogued folding-book and palm-leaf manuscripts. In consultation with the Southeast Asia Collection librarian, the junior fellow will create spreadsheets, written documentation, make notes for each title; and write a blog post at the conclusion of the fellowship.

    Full description: This is a project aiming to assist with the bibliographic control of Burmese rare manuscripts in the Southeast Asia Collection, Asian Division, and to provide access to these items. The Southeast Asia Collection has over 130 uncatalogued folding-book and palm-leaf manuscripts. Since these items lack metadata, they are not searchable in the Library’s online catalog nor serviceable by the Southeast Asia Collection librarian or the Asian Division staff. In consultation with the Southeast Asia Collection librarian, the junior fellow will: 1) create an Excel spreadsheet for each title; 2) transliterate or Romanize the titles and write a brief description for each item in the spreadsheet; 3) note items in need of preservation; 4) photograph any items appropriate for a Junior Fellow display and write a blog post at the conclusion of the fellowship. This project prepares materials for easy cataloging of these titles in the future. It will also lay a foundation for a future research guide for the Asian Division website.

    Required Skills: Advanced reading knowledge of Burmese, familiarity with Burmese Buddhism, interest in Buddhist studies, history and culture of Burma. Requires basic knowledge of MS Excel.

    Preferred Skills: General library experience, past coursework in Southeast Asian studies, Buddhist studies, or history of Burma, advanced reading knowledge of Shan preferred, and working knowledge of Pali.

  • #09 – African Academic Journal Indexing Project (African, Latin American & W European Division)

    Short description: This project will provide greater discoverability to the Library’s Africana collections that are acquired and cataloged by the Africa Section. One of the central tenets of the Library of Congress is to serve its collections to Congress and the public. By providing electronic discoverability of print-only journals, the Africa Section will meet the central goal to engage end users through greater offsite access to its collections.

    Full description: The African Academic Journal Indexing Project in the African, Latin American & Western European (ALAWE) Division, Acquisitions & Bibliographic Access Directorate, is a multi-institution initiative between the Library of Congress, UC Berkeley, Boston University, and Michigan State to give greater researcher access and discoverability to print-only academic journals published on the continent of Africa. The project started in 2016, and since then partner institutions have scanned and transcribed article-level metadata into MS Excel spreadsheets, with the goal of providing greater access for the print journals to researchers. As a partner library, the Library of Congress needs the assistance of a detail-oriented Junior Fellow to further streamline the workflow of the project, and to identify a methodology for the Library to share the existing metadata with the academic and research community. The Junior Fellow will be immersed in the historic African serials collections at the Library of Congress. All of the journals are published in Africa, however they cover a wide-range of scholarly topics, from archaeology to zoology, and from a largely African perspective. The dominant languages are English and French, although there are some journals in Arabic, Hausa and other African languages, expressed in both Roman and Arabic scripts. The scope of the Junior Fellow’s work is two-fold:

    1. work in the Africa Section of ALAWE to streamline the workflow for the project and develop a timeline for completion;
    2. utilize the existing metadata to assist the Africa Section. Together the section will determine best mode of access and discoverability for researchers to access the metadata through an index of the Library’s existing African Journal collections.

    Required Skills: Experience with MS Excel and PowerPoint.

    Preferred Skills: Knowledge of French, Portuguese, Hausa, Yoruba, Arabic and/or Swahili; interest in African history, politics and/or government; ability to work independently, attention to detail, excellent organizational and analytical skills.

  • #10 – Yiddish Uncatalogued Books (Asian and Middle Eastern Division)

    Short description: The Hebraic Section of the African and Middle Eastern Division (AMED) contains approximately 2600 uncatalogued books in Yiddish. The ideal Junior Fellow candidate will perform a variety of tasks that will greatly improve the quality of these Initial Bibliographic Catalogue records.

    Full description: The Hebraic Section of the African and Middle Eastern Division (AMED) contains approximately 2,600 uncatalogued books in Yiddish. These books are wide-ranging in nature and cover a wide range of topics and genres, including belles letters, drama, history, and politics, and cover the 19th and 20th centuries. The work of the 2020 Junior Fellow will build on the work of previous interns. This project includes making a 2016 Junior Fellow’s "stand-alone” finding aid in MS-Word (largely in Yiddish) to be more available to researchers outside of the Library. In 2017, a Junior Fellow fully cataloged 198 items and designated 34 items “Copy 2” titles. The current Junior Fellow will assist the process of generating skeletal initial bibliographic control (IBC) records in the LC ILS (Voyager) greatly improve the quality of these records. Training and mentorship will provided by a retired Asian and Middle Eastern (ASME) Division Chief and will be supervised by the Section Head of the Israel and Judaica Section.

    Required Skills: Interest and advanced reading knowledge of Yiddish, excellent listening and organizational skills, willingness to handle fragile books, and computer literacy.

    Preferred Skills: Ability to work independently, interest in cataloging and librarianship, and reading knowledge of Hebrew.

  • #11 – Prewar and Occupation Period Japanese Serials (Asian Division)

    Short description: The periodicals in the Japanese serial publications collection include roughly 3,500 titles covering diverse topics and generally date to the period 1900-1952. The Junior Fellow will inventory materials, verify titles and annotate the collection for future research.

    Full description: The Junior Fellow will work on this collections-oriented project aimed at improving bibliographic/inventory control and user accessibility to Japanese serial publications by conducting an inventory. The project requires advanced reading ability in Japanese. The periodicals in this collection include roughly 3,500 titles covering diverse topics and generally date to the period 1900-1952. For the inventory, the fellow will physically verify that titles from a master list are on the shelf, note any titles that appear on the shelf but not the list, record the number of issues available on the shelf, and flag damaged items for repair or rehousing. In addition to the inventory work, there will be an opportunity to contribute to the creation of a research guide that will allow the fellow to exercise their analytical skills by surveying and summarizing thematic aspects of the collection. The fellow may also elect to write a blog post on a topic of their choosing that relates to the contents of the periodicals in this collection. Examples of topics might include women’s issues, literature and arts, or colonial Taiwan, Korea, and Manchuria.

    Required Skills: Advanced reading proficiency in Japanese, familiarity with modern Japan, ability to conduct basic research and communicate in written English language.

    Preferred Skills: Experience with collection management in library setting, prewar Japanese publications, and reading in Japanese; familiarity with formal written Japanese from the prewar period (1868-1945), older kanji forms, variants ("kyūjitai") and advanced knowledge of modern Japanese history or literature.

  • #12 – Improving Access to Rights Restricted Foreign Newspapers (Digital Content Management Section)

    Short description: The Library’s new “Stacks 3.0” platform for accessing rights-restricted content, has allowed Library staff to provide secure onsite access to a variety of digital content, including tens of thousands of ePrint newspapers and eBooks covering a wide variety of subject areas, recommending divisions, and languages.

    Full description: Stacks 3.0, the Library’s new platform for accessing rights-restricted content, has allowed Library staff to provide secure onsite access to a variety of digital content, including tens of thousands of ePrint newspapers and eBooks covering a wide variety of subject areas, recommending divisions, and languages. The Junior Fellow will conduct a systematic review of the content to determine the accuracy of the bibliographic descriptions; communicate with ABA staff and suggest recommended updates to the bibliographic descriptions; and update the digital files to reflect the implemented changes and ensure the correct bibliographic descriptions in Stacks 3.0. The Junior Fellow will help to enhance discoverability and accessibility of the digital content in Stacks 3.0 in a variety of ways: 1. conduct a systematic review of the content currently in Stacks 3.0 to determine the accuracy of the bibliographic descriptions, noting any missing/incorrect bibliographic information (format and place, date, and language of publication); 2. communicate and recommended updates to the bibliographic descriptions; 3. update the digital files to reflect the implemented changes and ensure the correct bibliographic descriptions in Stacks 3.0; 4. provide accurate description of digital collections to support both collections-oriented and services-oriented Stacks 3.0 for staff and patrons alike.

    Required Skills: Ability to plan, organize, and execute work with specified deadlines; communicate effectively orally and in writing; use computerized search tools and databases; and use information systems.

    Preferred Skills: Knowledge of Marc fields; UNIX commands; and digital content lifecycle.

  • #13 – Home Movie Collection Processing (Moving Image Processing Unit)

    Short description: : The Junior Fellow will process the home movie portion of the Prelinger Archive Collection. The nature of the work is to wind through, inspect, conserve and describe the collection of home movies and relate the films to each other where possible.

    Full description: This project continues the work of the 2019 Junior Fellow who processed the home movie portion of the Prelinger Archive Collection. Time and progress permitting, the project may expand to other home movie collections housed in the Moving Image Section. The Prelinger Archive Collection contains approximately 400 home movies on 8mm and 16mm film, 200 of which have already been processed. These films often have little-to-no accompanying information and have been moved several times; take a great deal of examination; and require research to provide a useful level of detail for researchers. The nature of the work is to wind through, inspect, conserve and describe the collection of home movies and relate the films to each other where possible. This is a collections-oriented project, and the Junior Fellow would be expected to handle and describe specialized, unique material for use by researchers.The Junior Fellow will have a cubicle and film inspection bench available for their exclusive use in the first floor “radial area” of the Packard Campus. Note: This project is hosted National Audio Visual Conservation Center located in in Culpeper, Virginia.

    Required Skills: Knowledge/background in handling motion picture film; experience with collections processing and drafting descriptions; and conducting online research.

    Preferred Skills: Experience with MAVIS database, handling and repairing 16mm and 8mm film and conducting genealogy research.

  • #14 – John Allen Nitrate Film Processing (Moving Image Processing Unit)

    Short description: This project focuses on the John Allen Laboratories Collection, a collection of thousands of reels of nitrate film that contain unique material and encompass some of the earliest images captured on motion picture film. The Junior Fellow would also assist in identifying items for preservation from this collection and follow a few items through the motion picture laboratory’s preservation workflow.

    Full description: This project would focus on the John Allen Laboratories Collection, a collection of thousands of reels of nitrate film that contain unique material and encompass some of the earliest images captured on motion picture film. Previous discoveries in the collection have included feature films thought to be lost, Edison films and significant, unique examples of primitive film. The nature of the work is collections-oriented and would involve conservation, identification, and description of these unique items. The Junior Fellow would be tasked with handling fragile and unique material, identifying items using primary clues and secondary research, and describing these items in a database to make them more accessible to the public. The Junior Fellow would also assist in identifying items for preservation from this collection and follow a few items through the motion picture laboratory’s preservation workflow. The Junior Fellows will have computer access and film inspection benches in the nitrate film vaults. Note: This project is hosted at the National Audio Visual Conservation Center located in in Culpeper, Virginia.

    Required Skills: Knowledge/background in motion picture history and formats, and conducting online research.

    Preferred Skills: Experience with MAVIS database, handling and repairing 16mm and 8mm film and describing and processing collections.

  • #15 – Artists and Archives (Rare Book and Special Collections Division)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will identify, sort, arrange, and appropriately house materials in the Library of Congress Maret’s archive of type and book design in 2013 which has grown from 1,000 preparatory drawings and proofs, progressive states of the twenty-six letters, and sketchbooks to now include approximately 2,000 proofs, sketches, samples, and related ephemera.

    Full description: Artists and Archives Project intern will to work with staff of the Rare Book and Special Collection Division (RBSCD) to process artist and type designer Russell Maret’s archive. Known for his elaborately printed fine press and artist’s books, Russell Maret one of the most active and important type designer and printer practicing in the United States. Maret began printing in San Francisco in 1989, then began an apprenticeship with notable printer Peter Koch, and subsequently moved on to the Firefly Press in Somerville, Massachusetts. In 1993, Maret established his own press, creating sophisticated books that reflect his lengthy in-depth study of the history of letterforms and type design. Maret’s books often feature typefaces he designed with an eye to communicating the ideas of a specific text. Usually designing fonts digitally and printing from photo-polymer plates, Maret has also produced two metal typefaces. For this project, the Jr. Fellow(s) will identify, sort, arrange, and appropriately house Maret’s archival records. Preliminary drawing and pulls will be linked to the final printed piece, and a complete register or guide will be created to allow researchers to access the Maret’s archival materials. In addition to processing Maret’s archive, the Jr Fellow(s) will, in collaboration with RBSCD Recommending Officers, begin web archiving important artist book websites for the Library of Congress’ growing Web Archiving Collection. An artist’s book is a medium of artistic expression that uses the structure or function of “book” as inspiration—a work of art in book form. RBSCD has been dutifully collecting these books for several decades, now housed as the Artists’ Book Collection and the Press Collection. Artists websites hold a wealth of important information about the works of art housed in these two RBSCD collections, including printmaking techniques, artistic collaboration, and content creation. Unfortunately, these websites are extremely vulnerable. Creating an archive of artist websites will serve as a stable and permanent resource for researchers, educators, and students interested in art and craft of printing and book production in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

    Required Skills: Experience with MS suite (including Excel).

    Preferred Skills: Strong interest in modern art and visual culture; learning more about fine press, artists’ book, and letterpress collections.

  • #16 – Spotlighting Main Reading Room Collections and Resources (Researcher & Reference Services)

    Short description: Quite genuinely, this project enriches the library experience for researchers – both the casual researcher who happens upon an unexpected resource serendipitously and the more “serious” researcher who is tracking down a specific title.

    It also emphasizes the active use, and not just preservation, of the Main Reading Room with LibGuide collections.

    Full description: This project supports: expanding access to our print/physical collections and their complementary online resources; increasing visibility of our subject matter expertise and the research resources they develop, using connectors to bridge our online and print collections; enhancing the researcher’s experience as they are using the physical collection. This project brings a modern approach to print reference collections through the use of online research guides, highlighting eResources, etc. Through the Library of Congress LibGuides collections, we ensure that our physical and online presence references and reinforces users to explore all appropriate resources and collections within their research areas across multiple formats and Main Reading Room subject areas (Humanities, Social Sciences, History, and Genealogy). The Junior Fellow will work both independently and under the direction of subject matter librarians to convert guides from the legacy Web Guides interface/platform, into LibGuides. The Junior Fellow will work in various capacities: updating content; restructuring layouts; reviewing presentation; identifying gaps and identifying opportunities for the creation of collaborative/merged guides within and across divisions. With a user-first framework, the Junior Fellow will help to improve guide access and usability by providing point of need connections: How to access eResources/eBooks within that area; how to get to online research guides; use chat with a librarian online and/or submit a question, etc. Further highlighting Main Reading Room collections, the Fellow will assist in an overlap analysis project – identifying items within the collection that have corresponding online copies/eBooks/Databases/etc. Overall the Junior Fellow will work to improve the researcher’s experience of accessing and using the Library of Congress reference collection.

    Required Skills: Basic to advanced computer skills particularly experience with content management systems/web editing), ability to work both independently and collaboratively.

  • #17 – Virtual Reality and the Archaeology of the Americas (Geography and Map Division)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will learn about the archaeological collections of the Library of Congress, gain experience handling rare and extremely valuable examples of Mesoamerican art and use state-of-the-art 3D imaging technologies to make virtual reality representations of ancient pottery, jade and sculpture dating from 900 BCE – 1300 CE.

    Full description: This project involves the three-dimensional imaging and conversion to virtual reality formats of the Kislak Collection of the Archaeology of the Early Americas. The fellow will learn about the archaeological collections of the Library of Congress, will get experiences handling rare and extremely valuable examples of Mesoamerican art and use state-of-the-art 3D imaging technologies to make virtual reality representations of ancient pottery, jade and sculpture dating from 900 BCE – 1300 CE. Fellow should be interested in archaeology and cultural heritage preservation.

    Required Skills: Interest in archaeology, cultural heritage preservation, computer vision, or video game programming and willingness to use computer and laser imaging systems.

  • #18 – Measuring Light Source Effects (Preservation Research & Testing Division)

    Short description: This project will focus on measuring how different light sources affect the visual aging of inks and papers by using representative scientific reference samples. The Junior Fellow will use two micro-fade testers and spectral-radiometers (one broad-spectrum, one LED) which enable rapid light-induced fading and quantification. The Junior Fellow will collect, tabulate, and analyze the experimental fading data.

    Full description: The Preservation Research and Testing Division (PRTD) frequently undertakes fade-testing with partner divisions to evaluate the light sensitivity of objects for exhibition. This testing enables the safe exhibition of LC collections (for example, PRTD tested 8 comics in the Comic Art exhibit) and furthers the long term preservation of the collection. Many institutions are adding LED lighting to exhibitions. However, LEDs behave differently than traditional lighting, and it is unclear how their photochemical differences affect light sensitivity of objects. This project will focus on measuring how different light sources affect the visual aging of inks and papers by using representative scientific reference samples. Learnings will inform future testing and decisions for the exhibition of collection objects. The Junior Fellow will use two micro-fade testers and spectral-radiometers (one broad-spectrum, one LED) which enable rapid light-induced fading and quantification. These instruments will be used to induce light-aging of scientific samples. The Junior Fellow will collect, tabulate, and analyze the experimental fading data.

    Required Skills: Advanced hands-on laboratory experience; ability to perform detailed technical measurements; experience navigating lab instrument software; familiarity with MS Excel, Chem Office, SigmaPlot or comparable data management and manipulation software.

    Preferred Skills: Experience with light measurement instruments, spectroscopy analysis, display, or spectral processing software; other materials analysis or chemical analysis; knowledge of writing ink, printing ink, and artists’ paint formulations and/or deterioration.

  • #19 – Preservation Scientific Reference Center (Preservation Research & Testing Division)

    Short description: This project supports accessibility of the collections of the Library of Congress in either their original or reformatted form. Using scientific methods, the Junior Fellow will assist in a growing understanding of how materials age and degrade in order to best preserve them.

    Full description: The Center for Library Analytical Scientific Samples - Digital (CLASS-D) is a transformation initiative to increase access to scientific information about Library collection materials. To advance our preservation knowledge, reference samples in CLASS replicate materials in our collection for testing that cannot be done on collection materials. Even as we move to digital, our collection is physical, and to best preserve these collections we need to be able to fully understand how materials degrade – both the substrates (paper, parchment, sound recordings etc.) and media (pigments, inks, composites). The Junior Fellow will work with PRTD staff to catalog and baseline characterize with non-invasive analytical techniques a number of new collections that are in CLASS – 200 new pigment samples, paper fibers, papers etc. Characterizing samples allows us to see what materials in Library collection from specific time periods might be more at-risk, allowing for more proactive preservation actions. Given the importance of access to these reference materials and the data, the Junior Fellow will also work on helping create a “visual terminology” for access to images of different condition states of these materials. This will assist with the Mellon funded “Assessing the National Collection” project for paper, and create a platform for how these could more easily and effectively be shared with archive and heritage institutions collections staff for decision-making.

    Required Skills:Experience with chemistry and scientific laboratory, working knowledge of statistics and computer software, including Excel, Microsoft Word and PowerPoint; and proficiency in writing reports.

    Preferred Skills: Experience in library science, experience using Java, Python or other statistical data-based programs, ability to use data organization and manipulation database platforms.

  • #20 – Digital Data Aids for Communications and Outreach (Veterans History Project)

    Short description: This project supports the Veterans History Project's mission to make collections discoverable and accessible to the public so that future generations may better understand the realities of war. The Junior Fellow would have the opportunity to develop in-depth knowledge of individual collections, and hone capacity for harnessing data to further outreach.

    Full description: The Junior Fellow in the Veterans History Project (VHP) will assist with improved knowledge of holdings and creation of specific digital aids to increase discoverability and thereby outreach for the purpose of both increased collections access and development. The Fellow will gain experience working with data mining, interpreting collections, and helping to create a variety of digital projects including Tableau-powered GIS projects. Completion of this project will increase the discoverability of collection material to advance both general public and research knowledge of VHP collections holdings. Supervised data mining and related activities will advance several projects including heat maps for Congressional District participation in VHP, retroactive ADA accessibility of Blog posts/images and audio/video clips to enhance a variety of collections exposition for public consumption. By improving the existing digital curation offerings as well as creating tools to further similar efforts, the Fellow’s efforts will enhance both the general public knowledge of VHP collections. This project will help PCC staff be better able to identify collections of interest to Members, media and future researchers. Post-fellowship, these tools will provide valuable insights into as well as practical applications for existing VHP collections.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of military history, ability to communicate effectively both verbally and in writing; analyze archival materials; plan, organize and execute work within deadlines; use computerized search tools, databases and functions.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of archival processes and procedures.

  • #21 – DuPree African American Pentecostal Collection (Manuscript Division)

    Short description: The 2020 Junior Fellow in the Manuscript Division Preparation Section will provide valuable assistance arranging and providing online descriptions for a series within the DuPree collection a gift from historian and librarian Sherry Sherrod DuPree in 2019.

    Full description: The Manuscript Division Preparation Section will offer the selected Junior Fellow an opportunity to participate in the hands-on work and decision-making involved in arranging and describing a significant series within the DuPree African American Pentecostal Collection. The collection comprises 71,500 items, and the fellow will focus his or her time and effort arranging and describing a series not to exceed 20,000 items. The collection consists of correspondence, oral history interviews, reports, subject files, sheet music, printed material, posters, audiovisual recordings, born digital media, photographs, and other material related to the African American Holiness Pentecostal movement. Principal subjects covered include the religious and cultural aspects of African American Pentecostal and Holiness churches and the experiences of their congregations and communities from the 19th century through the early 21st century. The Junior Fellow will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of and ability to apply archival principles of arrangement and description; acquire skills though hands-on learning under the guidance of an archives specialist; experience all stages of archival processing; sharpen their skills in analyzing highly valuable historical records. The Junior Fellow will also learn from Manuscript Division to gain exposure to cataloging, preparation of finding aids, born digital workflows, and preservation assessments. The fellow’s work will enable the Manuscript Division to expedite the collection’s arrangement and description in order to make it fully available to researchers in the Manuscript Reading Room by the end of the summer 2020.

    Required Skills: Knowledge/background in American history and culture; and automated tools and technologies such as integrated library systems; ability to organize, describe and preserve archival materials; plan and meet deadlines; collaborate in a team setting, think critically and propose resolutions to problems, and communicate in writing.

  • #22 – Manuscript Reading Room Internship (Manuscript Division)

    Short description: The Manuscript Division is hiring two Junior Fellows who will improve reader services by delivering reference inquiries and collection materials within established guidelines during the busiest season in the Reading Room. The Junior Fellows will help to make the Library's collections available to a broader public and also participate in producing a LibGuide, based on recent acquisitions by the division and/or sustained researcher subject interests.

    Full description: Named after a longtime Manuscript Division staff member who retired as the head of the division's Reference & Reader Services Section in 2005, the Mary Wolfskill Trust Fund Internship is used to support internships in the Manuscript Division that will foster interest in archival work among graduate and undergraduate students, particularly minorities or students from smaller and lesser-known schools. The Elizabeth Brown Pryor Internship is another endowed Manuscript Division program named after a long-time Library patron, who in recognition of the division’s staff, left a legacy to support the operations of the Manuscript Reading Room. Overseeing a collection of approximately 70 million primary source items relating to American history and culture, the Manuscript Reading Room is a service-oriented focal point for members of Congress and their staff, the academic community, journalists, genealogists, documentary editors, and the general public conducting research in American history and culture. Among the nearly 12,000 collections available through the Reading Room are the personal papers of such notable Americans as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Walt Whitman, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and the records of non-governmental organizations such as the NAACP, National Woman’s Party, and National Urban League.

    Junior Fellows are employed in the Manuscript Reading Room, where they assist researchers in accessing the division's collections. Under the direction of the head of the Reference & Reader Services Section and a designated reference librarian mentor, Junior Fellows respond to reference inquiries received via telephone, electronic means, or in-person; analyze reference requests; investigate sources of information; draft, revise, and deliver responses; retrieve and re-shelve manuscript materials in response to circulation requests; and compile reader usage statistics. The Junior Fellows may also work on special finding aids projects that improve researcher access to the materials, such as LibGuides.

    Required Skills: Knowledge of American history and culture, ability to effectively work in a team, effectively communicate in writing, think critically and propose resolutions to problems and work within deadlines.

    Preferred Skills: Experience working in a research library environment, knowledge of integrated library systems, basic library applications, and other information technologies.

  • #23 – Paul Marvin Rudolph Architectural Archive (Prints and Photographs Division)

    Short description:The Paul Marvin Rudolph Architectural Archive is one of the largest architecture collections in the Prints & Photographs Division—an estimated 150,000 items. A team of archivists and technicians has responsibility for organizing and describing the archive and will soon digitize thousands of photographic slides with which the Junior Fellows can work. This project will add data that would aid access by future users of the collection.

    Full description: This project meets the strategic goals of the Prints and Photographs Division and the Library in a number of important ways. Making the Rudolph Archive more accessible is one of the top priorities of the division. This project will greatly enhance findability and understanding of Rudolph’s primary source materials. The project will also help the Library and the Division meet the goal of providing leadership to the library and information community by mentoring and educating the interns. The Junior Fellows will enhance the description of photographs and drawings in the archive of internationally renowned architect Paul Marvin Rudolph (1918-1997). Among his most famous buildings are the Yale Art & Architecture Building, the Cocoon House in Sarasota, FL; a master plan for the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama; and office towers in Asia. This collections-oriented project involves looking at the original visual materials and consulting published reference sources in order to add more detailed information about the design projects and the individual documents. Examples of Rudolph’s work are available at http://www.loc.gov/search/?q=Paul%20rudolph

    Required Skills:  Ability to handle archival material, work in a team, effectively communicate verbally and in writing, input data into documents, spreadsheets or databases; interpret, record and update pre-existing data fields; and knowledge of American Architectural history.

    Preferred Skills: Knowledge of archives and library theory; visual literary, and architectural history; and experience working with archival, architectural materials.

  • #24 – Digitizing Braille Music Scores (National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled)

    Short description: This project will focus on digitizing braille music collections and processing music instruction audio recordings for digital download from the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled (NLS) digital service called BARD (Braille Audio and Reading Download).

    Full description: Background: NLS serves the blind and print disabled community with accessible braille and audio materials. The NLS Music Section hosts the largest braille music collection in the world with more than 23,000 scores, and offers more than 2500 audio recordings on music appreciation and music instruction. NLS is digitizing its braille music collections and processing music instruction audio recordings for download from the NLS digital service called BARD (Braille Audio and Reading Download). Our goal is to make these materials available for digital download. The Junior Fellow would become familiar with the NLS services and additionally assist with daily routine tasks as needed. Subject areas involved: Library Science, Music, Digitization projects. Nature and scope of work: Creating catalog records in Voyager (MARC records); digitizing braille music scores; occasionally assist with collection development and circulation tasks. This is collections-oriented work that will help NLS to better serve their patrons. The Junior Fellow would be expected to digitize approximately 2000 pages of braille music scores and help cataloging approximately 150 of the 2000+ Smithsonian Folkways collection recordings audio materials.

    Required Skills: : Knowledge of music, music instruction, music performance, music publishing and printed sheet music, experience cataloging records in Voyager; creating MARC records, ideally music materials; digitizing materials; ability to learn operating special digitization scanners.

    Preferred Skills: Knowledge of NLS and its services; and a second language; understanding of accessible formats for the blind and visually impaired.

  • #25 – Eighteenth Century Statutes of France and New France (Law Library)

    Short Description: The Law Library is in possession of 44 document boxes of uncatalogued printed legal documents representing royal decrees and decisions of the French royal council from the reigns of King Louis XIV-King Louis XVI. The intern will record bibliographic information for each of the documents in the collection. The intern will also rehouse the items, which are currently housed in over-crowded document boxes.

    Full Description:

    1. The Law Library is in possession of 44 document boxes of uncatalogued printed legal documents representing royal decrees and decisions of the French royal council from the reigns of King Louis XIV-King Louis XVI. Total count is over 4000 documents.
    2. The documents include “Arrests du Conseil Du Roy” (Decisions of the Royal Council), “Declarations Du Roy” (Declarations of the King) and “Edits du Roy” (Edicts of the King). These touch upon trade, taxation, finance, property law, ecclesiastical property, and letters patent and relate to all jurisdictions under the dominion of the King of France.
    3. The purpose of this project is to make this collection accessible to public. To accomplish this, the intern will record bibliographic information for each of the documents in the collection. The intern will also rehouse the items, which are currently housed in over-crowded document boxes.
    4. The focus of this project is collection work.
    5. The intern performs bibliographic research on each document in the collection in order to identify and record: title, publication location, publication date, publication authority, pagination, dimensions, collation, and other copies of the items in the Library of Congress and in other institutions. This work lays groundwork for future full cataloging of the entire collection.

    Required Skills: Advanced knowledge of French language, colonial history, legal history or related field; ability to perform bibliographic research in the Library of Congress OPAC and use MS Excel; experience compiling reports using precise statistics and factual data.

    Preferred Skills: Knowledge of basic principles of bibliographic description.

  • #26 – Mapping a Global Community of Scholars (Kluge Center)

    Short description: In this project the Junior Fellow will assist the Kluge Center to curate scholars’ research; outline outcomes thematically, facilitate discoverability, and enhance the way in which researchers and the general public connect to the wealth of resources and opportunities available at the Kluge Center in the Library of Congress.

    Full description: Drawing from the experience of the scholars, interns, fellows, and the audio and video experience of investigating in a unique place, this Story Map, serves as an immersive platform to navigate, hand-in-hand, with the user into a world of infinite resources for thought. This project is the first in a series of digital resources related to Kluge Center’s scholars and their direct impact in the Library’s collections. The fellow will conduct research primarily at the Kluge Center, and secondly in the custodial divisions. The fellow will assist in creating innovative ways to connect scholars and the general public with the Kluge Center’s items available at the Library's website, thus expanding LC service and resources to learning communities in different formats. The goals of this project are to: 1. compile resources in multiple formats such as texts, images, maps, and manuscripts to expand community engagement to the Kluge Center research initiatives and events through the creation of a digital storytelling project by using the ArcGIS Story Map platform; 2. Assist Kluge Center staff gain a wide view our scholars’ profiles through the years; 3. identify and showcase the research performed by chairs, scholars, and interns and this information will be integrated into the Library's digital collections initiatives; 4. enhance outreach, expand access, enhance services, and optimize resources. The Junior Fellow’s research project will be used to promote universal access to the Kluge Center’s digital resources and library subject matter experts.

    Required Skills:

    Experience or strong interest in designing a digital storytelling project to connect scholars and learners with one another and with LC digital collections; experience in research and outreach services; ability to interconnect scholarship and librarianship research skills necessary to identify and engage with transdisciplinary and multi-format primary online skills that facilitate access to resources.

    Preferred Skills: capacity to expand the possibilities of helping users engage with digital sources in a creative way.

  • #27 – Informal Learning and Engagement Design (Office of Informal Learning)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will contribute to a priority project of the Center for Learning, Literacy and Engagement’s to develop a new learning space as part of the new Visitor Experience Master Plan. , a signature initiative of the Librarian of Congress and a key element of the Library’s plan to become more accessible to visitors, including learners of all ages.

    Full description: During 2020, the Center for Learning, Literacy and Engagement is conducting program testing to inform the development of a new learning center outlined in the Library’s new Visitor Experience Master Plan. The incumbent will support the Center in designing, implementing, and evaluating programs for visiting families and will participate in a prototyping initiative. The project would provide the fellow with insights into principles of informal learning and essential elements of public programming, visitor services, and exhibition development. The project is service oriented. The fellow would lead programs for students and families, staff public events, and evaluate programs including conducting observations and collecting visitor feedback.

    Required Skills: Experience working with youth or families, particularly in an informal setting; and familiarity with informal learning principles and issues.

    Preferred Skills: Ability to communicate effectively for students, staff and public events; communication skills in writing.

  • #28 – Primary Source-Based Educational Resource (K-12) (Learning and Innovation Office)

    Short description: By bringing together rich primary sources related to civic engagement, along with materials that support their effective use in the classroom and potentially in the Library's spaces for young people, the Library can create resources that will empower educators and learners in the history of, and possible strategies for, engagement with the nation’s civic life.

    Full description: The Learning and Innovation office of the Library of Congress, as a service to the nation's K-12 educators and learners, provides materials and programs that support the effective classroom use and exploration of historical primary sources. This project will help meet the needs of Learning and Innovation as it fulfills its mission to support the educational use of primary source items from its collections, and will support the Library's mission of providing the American people with a rich, diverse, and enduring source of knowledge that can be relied upon to inform, inspire, and engage them, and to support their intellectual endeavors. The 2020 fellow would contribute to the development of an educational resource highlighting items from the historical collections of the Library of Congress related to civic engagement and supporting teacher professional development and student exploration related to those collections. Duties could include conducting research on the topics; selecting online primary sources from the Library's collections for inclusion in the teacher resource; drafting text for background materials; brainstorming promotional ideas for spreading the word about the resource in the K-12 educational community.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Ability to conduct online and offline research; and write for an educational audience, knowledge/academic background in either U.S. history or K-12 education.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Ability to work well as part of a team, and familiarity with current K-12 educational practices and issues.

  • #29 – Archiving the National Book Festival (Signature Programs Office)

    Short description: The National Book Festival has been the Library of Congress's signature event since 2001, and it now resides in the Signature Programs Office. The primary purpose of this project is to consolidate information and provide recommendations via the Junior Fellow's assigned deliverable which will make the planning of the National Book Festival more effective and efficient.

    Full description: The Library of Congress National Book Festival is a premier national book event, drawing highly acclaimed authors as participants and thousands of attendees. Coordination of activities must be as near to flawless as possible. The event is highly complex and requires coordination of many tasks and details. Facilitating communications among all the players in this event is critical to a successful festival. This project will expose the Junior Fellow(s) to the inner workings of planning a major festival for a government agency. The purpose of the project is to create working historical and planning records of the festival. The fellows will also have the opportunity to attend festival meetings, and attend the festival on August 29, 2020. The work entails identifying key sections of content and reorganizing the material into more easily digestible forms (e.g. a series of podcasts with specific themes), adding metadata and additional descriptive materials where necessary. Background in humanities, information science, and basic experience with editing and processing digital audio and video files preferred. The Junior Fellow(s) will create one of four deliverables, depending on assignment: a written history of the National Book Festival, recommendations for the revamp of the National Book Festival Website, a project management digital guide for the National Book Festival, or an audit of National Book Festival patrons, creating an analysis breakdown and recommendations for content, programming, sponsorship and more.

    Required Skills: Ability to work efficiently with others, communicate both verbally and in writing, apply project management principles and concepts, work within deadlines and think critically; experience using MS Word and Excel.

    Preferred Skills: Knowledge of MS Project and best practices in website management.

  • #30 – Program and Project Management Community of Practice (U.S. Copyright Office)

    Short description: In this project, a Junior Fellow will assist the United States Copyright Office to research, organize, make recommendations and set up a website forum of documents, handbooks, standard operating procedural guides, program and project management to include data management, requirements, cost analysis, and acquisition management.

    Full description: The United States Copyright Office “is responsible for administering a complex and dynamic set of laws, which include registration, the recordation of title and licenses, a number of statutory licensing provisions, and other aspects of the 1976 Copyright Act and the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act.” The Copyright Modernization Office Section is establishing a Program and Project Management Community of Practice across the Legislative, Independent, Judicial, Tribal, and other agencies. The project would entail researching Federal websites to determine best accessibility for non-executive agencies and taking materials compiled by subject matter experts to be displayed on a Federal site that most if not all federal and Tribal agencies can access. The Fellow will research and recommend an authorized site, and populate the site using judgment and creativity. The Fellow will work with professional staff to create engaging and interactive webpages for selected materials to highlight the material for a one-day display. This forum will be the first of its kind project accessible to varied agencies and tribal branch communities across the Federal government.

    Required Skills:Ability to understand MS Publisher and use MS PowerPoint. Ability to communicate in writing. Ability to work collaboratively with others. Ability to present information orally through briefings and presentations. Skill in researching, and analyzing. Ability to plan, organize, and maintain an efficient workflow.

    Preferred Skills: Ability to communicate in writing and set up online forums and Communities of Practice.

  • #31 – Quotations Database Prototype (Congressional Research Service)

    Short description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will support the creation of a database of quotations that enables Congressional Research Service (CRS) staff to support Members and staff with choosing quotes that strengthen a speech by emphasizing and reinforcing a point, tapping into the audience's memories and associations, and bolstering the speaker's engagement with the audience.

    Full description: The Junior Fellow will create a database of quotations that are frequently requested by Members of Congress. The Congressional Research Service (CRS) has been responding to inquiries about quotations for over seventy-five years. As elected officials and leaders, Members of Congress are frequently called upon to deliver speeches and other public remarks to a range of audiences. This project supports the Library’s goals of expanding access to a unique resource. It also enhances services by transforming an analog resource into a useful digital experience. Finally the project will assist CRS’s mission to act as a research extension to the staff of each Member and committee. A large part of the work involves locating previously verified quotes, many of which have been used by Members, in a 544-page dictionary of quotations published by a former CRS staff in 1989. Even with the help of an index, finding the right quotation within the publication can be time and labor intensive. The project will investigate how to convert printed quotations into a searchable database to enable CRS reference staff to quickly find relevant quotations to assist Members and their staff with speechwriting. The project will improve reference service to Congress, and will make a well-used authoritative product more accessible to staff working off-site. The work involves using existing CRS software to create a prototype database with appropriate metadata. The Junior Fellow is expected to gather requirements and consult with digital services librarians to develop a well-designed user interface to browse and search for quotations. The Junior Fellow is expected to collaborate with CRS staff, report on progress, and meet deadlines, as well as produce a prototype and a final report.

    Required Skills: Ability to organize information and metadata, understanding of the principles of information retrieval using technology, and ability to communicate effectively.

    Preferred Skills: Familiarity with database design and SharePoint.

  • #32 – Journey Mapping Digital Accessibility (Design & Development Office)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will assist creating cohesive presentation of the scope and impact of using best practices in digital accessibility at the Library. Following the Library’s new strategy for being user-centered and data driven, this project will result in a better and common understanding of how making digital products accessible requires teamwork across the Library.

    Full description: Of importance more today than ever, accessibility is a foundational principle at the Library for our user communities and our employees. The Library has made progress, but there is much more to do. To assist with this work, a journey map of digital accessibility would serve as a helpful tool to understand the current digital landscape and set a vision for applying digital accessibility at a larger scale in the near future. This activity will serve as a way for a Junior Fellow to learn more about designing and developing digital products using best practices, and how to use journey mapping as a way to build shared understanding in an organization. After gathering background information about the current processes, standards, and implementations of digital accessibility at the Library, the Fellow will work with a variety of stakeholders across the organization to create a journey map of digital accessibility for Library products. This project will give the Fellow a unique view on the work of a cross-functional group and the practice of using visual representation to communicate impactful ideas. This project ultimately results not only in better access for those with assistive devices but better access for the general public and Library employees. The Fellow with work multiple stakeholders across the Library including OCIO, Office of General Counsel, EEOE, Communications, and other Service Units.

    Required Skills: Experience communicating visually, good time management, interviewing and organizational skills.

    Preferred Skills: Familiarity with product management concepts, accessibility concepts, and how to create journey maps in the tools of their choice.

  • #33 – User-Centered Outreach Strategies (Digital Innovation Division)

    Short description: This project will contribute to the division’s needs for effective outreach strategies and materials to support the continued use and broad awareness of Library of Congress digital collections, programs, and data. It supports the Library’s mission to provide the American people with a rich, diverse, and enduring source of knowledge to support their intellectual and creative endeavors.

    Full description: The Library of Congress Labs launched in 2017 to provide a public space for innovation and iterative experimentation around our digital collections and data. We are trying to reach new audiences for digital collections and run several public-facing programs that promote digital scholarship, data visualization, and other computational uses of our collections. Crowd.loc.gov launched in October of 2018 as a public engagement program called “By the People” and open source tool called Concordia that invites the public to transcribe and tag library collections to increase findability and use of our digital collections. We are seeking a Junior Fellow to research key audiences that Labs and “By the People” are trying to reach, recommend strategies to reach target audiences via the labs.loc.gov and crowd.loc.gov websites and their associated social media channels, develop content and messaging for specific audiences, and recommend a program to evaluate how well a message or strategy reached the desired audiences.

    Required Skills: Knowledge and experience in Communications and Outreach around digital products and/or services; experience with professional writing and editing.

    Preferred Skills: Experience with user-centered design practices and professional social media experience.

  • #34 – Biography of a Dataset (Digital Innovation Division)

    Short description: In this project the Junior Fellow will provide a proof of concept for the Library of Congress to support new research methods and tell a richer story about our collections that includes contextual information known by the curators, developers, project managers, and others involved in the creation and transformation of digital collections.

    Full description: In this digital project, the Junior Fellow will support the mission of the Library in various ways, but largely through connecting people to the Library’s collections. Machine learning and other data-intensive uses of technology are rapidly emerging in the cultural heritage landscape. Practitioners of these methods have asked for more and deeper information about the history, anthropology, or biography of the datasets they’re using. By documenting information that is currently known only to staff, this project will expand access to the deep knowledge within the collections. Researchers use collections in ways that those who originally gathered and described them could never have imagined. The goal of this work will be to create and model at least one “dataset biography” that might help users understand the history and context of a digital collection as it has become a dataset; 2. The selection of datasets will be based on the Fellow’s disciplinary interest and the needs of the project, but will touch on a wide range of areas in the library; 3. The summary will describe the provenance of the collection items as well as the metadata provenance; 4.The Junior Fellow will have some leeway in selecting a dataset that corresponds to their interest, but the project will be both collections and service-oriented, aimed at making Library-operations more transparent to broad audiences who seek to understand the rich context of library collections as data; 5. The fellow will gather documents as well as conducting interviews with collection stewards and staff who have been involved in transformations of collections over years, including microfilming, imaging, and description. It will also include research about the possible absences from the digital dataset, ways it can be used ethically, and what kinds of conclusions one might responsibly draw from the dataset.

    Required Skills: Advanced writing, verbal communication and analytic skills; familiarity with research, including with cultural heritage data; experience with historical and/or ethnographic research methods.

    Preferred Skills: Design and project management skills, familiarity with one or more LC digital collections, and experience using digital scholarly methods.

    Junior Fellows Program Specific Frequently Asked Questions

    1. How competitive is the Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program?

      Based on our experience with other fellowship programs offered here at the Library of Congress, we expect this to be a highly competitive program, with a large number of applications from very qualified and motivated students. Therefore, we must strictly adhere to the requirements for application packages and the deadline for their submission. Interested applicants are encouraged to carefully read the application criteria and procedures.

    2. What are the selecting officials looking for in the application?

      Selecting officials may consider course selection, work experience, language skills, and interests related to the various subject areas noted on the announcement. While not required, experience or education in library-related fields can be a plus.

    3. I am interested in more than one subject area of this program. Can I apply to more than one? Must I submit separate applications for each?

      In your cover letter, state explicitly your areas of interest. Your education, experience, and general background should affirm your selections and demonstrate your wish for serious consideration for each subject area you identified. Submit only one application package.

    4. Do you provide financial aid?

      No. Fellows receive a stipend of $450.00 per week, not financial aid. They are also eligible for Transit Benefits, a transit subsidy program for qualified individuals who use the Metro system, Virginia Rail Express, MARC commuter trains, and county and commercial buses and qualified commercial van pools to commute to their jobs at the Library.

    5. Do you provide housing?

      No. The Library of Congress does not provide housing to Junior Fellows, and housing is the full responsibility of the Junior Fellow.

      The Library is located on Capitol Hill in southeast Washington, DC. The closest metro station is Capitol South (Blue, Orange, and Silver lines). There is a Red line stop at Union Station, which is a 15-minute walk from the Library. Union Station is also the closest point where commuter trains from Maryland (e.g., MARC) and Virginia (e.g., VRE) stop.

      Although the Library of Congress does not provide any specific recommendations for housing, the following resources may be helpful as you look for housing in the Washington, DC-area. You may also consider arranging housing through your college or university alumni organization.

      There are also commercial services specializing in finding temporary housing for interns that you can find by an online search.

    6. Do you provide parking options for Junior Fellows?

      No. Fellows are strongly encouraged not to bring private cars to Washington; parking near the Library is very limited and expensive. The Library of Congress is located on Capitol Hill in Southeast Washington, DC. The nearest Metro station is Capitol South. Metro routes may be found at: www.wmata.com External

    7. How many academic credits do I receive in the program?

      The Library of Congress is not an academic institution and does not grant course credits. However, you may want to check with your school about receiving credits for your fellowship.

    8. I am not available to start the fellowship on May 26, 2020. Am I still eligible?

      The schedule and the length of the fellowship direct that we require all fellows to report on the same day.

    9. Can my fellowship lead to a full-time job?

      The fellowships come with no guarantee for permanent employment. However, we encourage those interested in careers at the Library of Congress to look at all job opportunities listed at the USAJOBS website. The new skills and experience gained during your time at the Library can be used as a stepping stone and the supervisor of your fellowship can be a valuable reference for your future job searches.

    10. Will these fellowships be offered in the Fall/Winter?

      No. This is a summer fellowship program only.

      For additional information about the Library of Congress, visit https://www.loc.gov/ifp Click on the Overview tab to explore other internships at the Library of Congress.

    11. Do I need to provide a transcript?

      Yes. You must submit a legible copy of your college/university transcripts with your online application. Unofficial transcripts are acceptable at the time of application. Official transcripts will be required if selected for the position. Transcripts must be issued by the college or university, and must include your name, the name of the institution, and the courses and course dates. Screenshots, Word or other text documents, and stand-alone course lists are not acceptable. Failure to submit the required legible documentation at the time of application will result in disqualification. If you are selected, when the conditional offer is made, you will be required to provide a fully official transcript.

    12. What do I do if I am interested in only one project and no other?

      If you are only interested in only one specific project choice, repeat the same title as your 1st, 2nd and 3rd preference.