U.S. Citizen Junior Fellows Program

  • Hosting Service Unit: All Library of Congress
  • Program Contact: juniorfellows@loc.gov
  • Interests/Areas of Study: STEM; Collections Conservation and Preservation; Law; Business; Humanities, Art and Culture; Library Information Science; Communications; Chemistry and Science; Congressional Relations; Geography and Maps; Government and Business Administration; Information Technology; Legislative Information; Policy Analysis; Public Relations; Cataloguing; Copyright; Digital Stewardship; Education; Finance; Community Access and Outreach; Project Management; Research; Web Services
  • Citizenship: U.S. Citizen
  • Application Period: Annually
  • Application Notes: The application period for Junior Fellows Program 2023 is open and is slated to close Monday, November 28, 2022. See important information listed below: A. General FAQ on all the programs available at the Library; B. Specific FAQ for the Junior Fellows Program; C. List of the Project Descriptions and skills.
  • Compensation: Onsite: $15.60 per hour for 10 weeks. Rates are subject to variations based on federal cost of living adjustments. Remote: $15.60 - $16.41 per hour. Rates are subject to variations based on federal cost of living adjustments and differences in locality pay area rates.
  • Academic Credit: The Library does not provide academic credit, but you may arrange with your school in advance to receive credit.
  • Available Benefits: No Benefits
  • Program Duration: Short-term. Full Time. 10-week Summer internship appointment. May 22, 2023, to July 28, 2023.
  • Qualifications: Undergraduate or graduate students currently enrolled and/or graduating in the months of December 1, 2022 - June 30, 2023.
  • Frequently Asked Questions

Program Overview

The Library of Congress Junior Fellows Program is an annual summer internship program that enables undergraduate and graduate students to experience the integrated analog and digital collections and services of the world's largest, all-inclusive library. Working under the direction of Library curators and specialists in various divisions, fellows explore digital initiatives and increase access to the institution’s unparalleled collections and resources. Fellows are exposed to a broad spectrum of library work: copyright, preservation, reference, access, and information technology. In the past, summer fellows have identified hundreds of historical, literary, artistic, cinematic and musical gems representing the Library’s rich cultural, creative and intellectual assets. No previous experience is necessary, but fellowships are competitive and special skills or knowledge are usually desired. Selections are based on academic achievement, reference calls, and an interview with a selection official.

To learn about the Junior Fellows Program, please view the project descriptions and the previous job vacancy below to gain an overview of the program structure and the overall application process. 

Program Focus

The focus of the program is to increase access to special, legal and copyright collections, and to promote awareness and appreciation of the Library's services to researchers including Congressional members, scholars, students, teachers, and the general public. Fellows encourage the use of collections and services − ensuring that the Library of Congress is known as a living, dynamic center for scholarly work and connections. Program participants inventory, catalog, arrange, preserve, and research collections in varied formats, as well as assist in digital library initiatives. Upon completion of their assignments, fellows work closely with Library curators and specialists to plan and present a display of their most significant discoveries and accomplishments.

The Junior Fellows Program is supported by a grant from the Mellon Foundation to the Library for a multiyear initiative to connect more deeply with Black, Hispanic, Indigenous and other minority communities by expanding its collections, using technology to enable storytelling, and offering more internship and fellowship opportunities. The initiative, Of the People: Widening the Path, creates new opportunities for more people to engage with the Library, thus weaving a more inclusive American story.

This initiative is part of a larger vision at the Library to connect with all Americans by inviting new generations of interns to participate in creating, preserving and sharing the nation’s cultural treasures and building on the Library’s commitment to collect and preserve more underrepresented perspectives and experiences.

The Junior Fellows Program, a signature initiative of the Library of Congress since 1991, is made possible by a gift from the late James Madison Council member Nancy Glanville Jewell through the Glanville Family Foundation and the Knowledge Navigators Trust Fund and by an investment from the Mellon Foundation.

The Junior Fellows Program offers a paid ten week virtual internship for undergraduate and graduate students working with Library of Congress collections. The fellows explore digital initiatives and inventory, catalog, arrange, preserve and research a backlog of special, legal or copyright collections in many different formats. 

Please note that the application period for the 2023 Junior Fellows Program closed on Monday, November 28, 2022.

Interested in applying? Prepare to apply for JFP 2024 by  viewing this resource: How to ApplyMark your calendars, JFP 2024 is slated to open again in October 2023. 

Selection Process

Applications will be forwarded to selecting officials in the Library who will arrange telephone interviews with promising applicants, based on materials submitted. Letters of recommendation are not required for this application. After completion of the selection process those selected will be provided with detailed information on reporting for their fellowship.

The Library of Congress is an equal opportunity employer. Women, minorities, and persons with disabilities who meet eligibility requirements are strongly encouraged to apply.

Here are the projects offered for Junior Fellows Program 2023 

The Junior Fellows Program is offering 15 Remote Projects:

  1. Enhancing Discovery of Cataloged Event Videos (Remote)
  2. Cine Latine: Shaping Latino Representation at the Movies (Remote)
  3. Researching the 19th and early 20th Century Black Press (Remote)
  4. Adding Diversity to the Business History Record (Remote)
  5. Archive of Public Broadcasting Online Exhibit Curation (Remote)
  6. Year of Keyboard Accessibility (Remote)
  7. Connecting Communities: If We Tweet, Will They Come? (Remote)
  8. Effective User Research at the Library of Congress (Remote)
  9. Quality Assurance and Testing Using the Scaled Agile Framework (Remote)
  10. 9-1-1 Services in Rural and Remote Regions (Remote)
  11. The Legacy of Daniel A.P. Murray: Mapping the Stories (Remote)
  12. Archiving the National Book Festival (Remote)
  13. National Book Festival: Literary Programming (Remote)
  14. Culturally Relevant Pedagogy with LC Digital Collections (Remote)
  15. Copyright Card Catalog Metadata Capture Project (Remote)

The Junior Fellows Program is offering 14 Onsite Projects:

  1. Access for Newly Acquired Armenian-American Materials (Onsite)
  2. Inventory Review Protocols for International Collection Materials (Onsite)
  3. Inventory of South Asian Language Serial Titles (Onsite)
  4. Local History of U.S. Immigrant Communities, 1880-1924 (Onsite)
  5. Science and Business Pamphlet Collection (Onsite)
  6. Digital Preservation: American Archive of Public Broadcasting (Onsite)
  7. Universal Music Group Collection Lacquer Processing (Onsite)
  8. Elizabeth Brown Pryor Internship, Manuscript Reading Room (Onsite)
  9. Mary Wolfskill Internship, Manuscript Reading Room (Onsite)
  10. Martha Graham Legacy Project 2023 (Onsite)
  11. Enhancing Visibility: 19th Century American Music Manuscripts (Onsite)
  12. Paul Marvin Rudolph Architectural Archive (Onsite)
  13. Artists and Archives (Onsite)
  14. Engaging Families at the Library of Congress (Onsite)

Project Descriptions

Junior Fellows 2023 Projects

The Junior Fellows Program is offering 15 Remote Projects:

  1. Enhancing Discovery of Cataloged Event Videos (Remote) (Digital Collections Management & Services Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will enhance the discoverability of event videos of Library-hosted programming, such as lectures, concerts, and symposia.

    Full Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will enhance the discoverability of Library digital resources that comprise the cultural records of this nation. The Library records and publishes event videos of Library-hosted programming, such as lectures, concerts, and symposia. These event videos include unique recordings of well-known authors, artists, musicians, and cultural figures. The Digital Content Management (DCM) section inventories and preserves Library event videos in managed storage, and provides access to these videos in accordance with Digital Collections Management Compendium guidelines. The Junior Fellow will: analyze approximately 3,000 online records for cataloged event videos; research speaker names against the Library’s Name Authority File; recommend authorized access points; and provide metadata updates to enhance these digital collections. This project allows researchers and the public to find recordings of prominent speeches, conversations, and performances that they may not have otherwise known existed (nor been able to attend in person).

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Ability to plan, organize, and execute work with specified deadlines; communicate effectively orally and in writing; use computerized search tools, databases, and functions; use information technology and online systems, and; ability to work independently, and in a team setting.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Ability to utilize metadata tools and applications, such as MarcEdit, OpenRefine, etc. Knowledge of library cataloging rules, practices, and/or procedures, and digital content lifecycle and management practices.

  2. Cine Latine: Shaping Latino Representation at the Movies (Remote) (Latin American Caribbean and European Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will develop, as a priority, a Latino Film Research Guide for the Latin American, Caribbean, and European Division (LACE).

    Full Description: The Latino Film Research Guide will connect users to moving image collections within the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center that feature Latino characters and stories. Latino voices have been historically underrepresented in many forms of media, but there has recently been a shift to have more diverse stories portrayed in movies. With the guidance of a project mentor, the Junior Fellow will develop, as a priority, a Latino Film Research Guide for the Latin American, Caribbean, and European Division (LACE). In consultation with specialists in the Moving Image Research Center, the Junior Fellow will: survey the Library’s collections; curate a chronological filmography; create related resources; compile a list of influential Latino filmmakers; and conduct a series of interviews with emerging Latino filmmakers and film critics. Through this project, the Junior Fellow will gain significant experience using library and archival collections to develop cultural heritage projects, as well as, experience with researching topics in Latino and Film Studies.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Demonstrated strong research and writing skills; strong interest in moving image formats; ability to prioritize work and meet deadlines; ability to communicate effectively in writing; experience with conducting structured interviews; ability to think critically and propose resolutions to problems; and ability to work effectively and collaboratively in a team setting. Knowledge of or familiarity with Spanish/Spanglish; interest in or knowledge of Latino or Film studies; research experience or experience using library/archival collections.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Ability to interpret and create metadata for collection items. Familiarity with LibGuides platform; Experience in creative projects relating to underrepresented or communities of color in the US.

  3. Researching the 19th and early 20th Century Black Press (Remote) (Serial and Government Publications Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will perform research, write essays and increase discoverability of African-American newspaper titles available in the Chronicling America Historic American Newspapers database under the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP).

    Full Description: The Junior Fellow, working on this remote project, gains an opportunity to perform research and write essays about African-American newspaper titles available in the Chronicling America Historic American Newspapers database under the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP). In 2021, this major initiative began to digitize a collection of miscellaneous 19th- and early 20th-century newspapers from the Black American press while expanding collection access and providing context for many of the individual newspaper titles. The Junior Fellow will create approximately ten well-researched newspaper history essays (up to 500 words each) that represent significant titles from this collection. The essays will provide additional context to the content in the newspapers, the community they served, and the publishers and editors who created the newspapers. Americans will benefit from this project by gaining a deeper understanding of the Black Press and its impact.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Ability to perform research in historic primary resources; ability to research and write concise, well-written essays for public consumption; knowledge of 19th- and early 20th-century African-American History, including people, events, and places; familiarity in using digital collections repositories or databases, or digitized materials.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Experience in research or writing related to communities of color, particularly African-American.

  4. Adding Diversity to the Business History Record (Remote) (Science Technology and Business Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will research and write “This Month in Business History” pages on historically underrepresented groups that influenced the U.S. business environment.

    Full Description: The Business Reference Section publishes “This Month in Business History,” a blog series that describes specific economic and business events, and connects researchers to Library collections. Working remotely, the Junior Fellow will research and write “This Month in Business History” pages on historically underrepresented groups that influenced the U.S. business environment. These pages will feature historically important individuals and associations in business history that may be lesser known to students and researchers. This will expand opportunities for diverse audiences to engage with the Library, promote a deeper understanding of the country’s historical record, and connect Americans to an informed future. In this collections-based project, the Junior Fellow will independently research individuals and organizations through the Library’s collections, synthesize the information that they locate, and write a substantive biography or organizational profile based on their findings. The Junior Fellow will choose from a group of selected individuals and organizations to create and publish profiles that encourage additional research.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Ability to research and to synthesize information in writing; education and/or interest in American history.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Previous experience with LibGuides platform or other web products.

  5. Archive of Public Broadcasting Online Exhibit Curation (Remote) (National Audio Visual Conservation Center)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will explore and make discoverable the work of digital preservation within the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) representing our nation’s diverse cultural heritage.

    Full Description: In this remote project, the Junior Fellow will curate a new exhibit selected in consultation with the Project Mentor that relates to public broadcasting’s coverage of the histories and cultures of Black, Hispanic, Indigenous, or communities of color. The Junior Fellow will explore the work of digital preservation within the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) promoting materials held in the National Audiovisual Conservation Center (NAVCC). The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and WGBH Boston to digitally preserve public television and radio programs from the past 70 years and make them accessible again. The AAPB website includes curated exhibits exploring how public broadcasting has covered topics of current and enduring concern. The Junior Fellow will gain skills researching, organizing, describing, and displaying audiovisual programs that more fully represent our nation’s diverse cultural heritage.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Ability to communicate effectively in writing; ability to conduct research using authoritative sources; knowledge of U.S. history since 1950.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Ability Experience in research or writing related to underrepresented communities. Knowledge of broadcasting and journalism practices; HTML skills; experience with digital humanities tools.

  6. Year of Keyboard Accessibility (Remote) (Office of the Chief Information Officer/IT Design & Development Directorate/Design Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will research the history, trends and progress of accessibility to create resources and activities in support of the “Year of Keyboard Accessibility.”

    Full Description: In this remote project, the Junior Fellow will be helping create resources and activities for the accessibility team’s “Year of Keyboard Accessibility.” It offers an emerging accessibility professional an opportunity to work with the accessibility team to create content, plan and hold events, and learn about assistive technology and how accessibility works within the Library of Congress. At the same time, this work will help improve accessibility at the Library which allows more individuals with disabilities to access and engage with Library content. “The Year of Keyboard Accessibility” is an initiative to raise awareness at the Library about the needs of individuals with disabilities. In particular, we will be focusing on the importance of the keyboard in supporting individuals with motor, visual, and cognitive disabilities. This educational program will reach all areas of the Library with the goal of improving access to resources for people with disabilities. The project relates to Library operations, but directly affects access to collections and services. The Junior Fellow(s) will be supporting this effort by creating new documentation and video content, as well as, planning activities and events.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Accessibility evaluation; teaching; accessibility and assistive technology; strong writing skills.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Video editing.

  7. Connecting Communities: If We Tweet, Will They Come? (Remote) (Office of the Chief Information Officer/IT Design & Development Directorate/Design Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will support efforts to make grants to higher education institutions, libraries, archives, museums, and artists/scholars-in-residence to create projects that remix and reuse the Library’s digital collections in creative and imaginative ways

    Full Description: The Library of Congress was awarded a Mellon Foundation grant titled Of the People: Widening the Path (OTP) to fund a new, multi-year initiative to connect the Library more deeply with Black, Indigenous, Hispanic or Latino, Asian American and Pacific Islander and other communities of color. Connecting Communities Digital Initiative (CCDI) is one of three program arms of OTP. This project will provide direct experience with CCDI program activities including, but not limited to: communications development and outreach; collections research; grantee support; and, additional activities based on the recipients’ interests. We offer grants to higher education institutions, libraries, archives, museums, and artists/scholars-in-residence to create projects that remix and reuse the Library’s digital collections in creative and imaginative ways. We also work with undergraduate and graduate students as interns/fellows to learn about and expand CCDI. This is both a research and service-oriented position. Fellows in this program may embark on research to support CCDI communications efforts, support CCDI grantees, and/or undertake individual or joint projects connected to their own course of study, depending on their interests and the needs of the program.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Ability to work effectively and efficiently with others; experience working with and coursework related to the histories of one or more of the following groups—Black, Indigenous, Hispanic or Latino, Asian American and Pacific Islander communities, and other communities of color; strong writing skills and ability to write for a general audience; knowledge of cultural heritage materials in general, and of some uses of digital library materials in new forms; experience communicating to diverse audiences through various forms of media.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Experience developing blog posts, marketing and outreach, social media, and other communications. Previous work experience with digital materials in a library, museum, or archival setting. Knowledge of digital platforms and tools and of best practices in podcast creation.

  8. Effective User Research at the Library of Congress (Remote) (Office of the Chief Information Officer/IT Design & Development Directorate/Design Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will research ways that user-centered design (emphasizing diverse audiences) can improve access to digital products and build a framework for applying user research throughout the Library.

    Full Description: Effective user research continues to be an important activity at the Library to better understand our user communities and our employees. To assist with growth in this area, the Junior Fellow, working remotely, will engage with staff to understand the current landscape for products and services, conduct best practices research, and build a framework for applying user research throughout the Library. This project will enable the Junior Fellow to learn more about designing and developing digital products using best practices, and how to utilize user research to build approaches that are truly user-centered. After gathering background information about the current processes, standards, and implementations of user research at the Library, the Junior Fellow will work with a variety of stakeholders to create a framework for Library products. This project will provide emerging professionals a unique opportunity to explore understanding how user-centered design (emphasizing diverse audiences) can improve access to digital products.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Good time management, interviewing skills, and organizational skills; familiarity with how to communicate visually.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Candidate is preferred to be familiar with user research concepts, product design concepts, and how to create journey maps and/or process diagrams.

  9. Quality Assurance and Testing Using the Scaled Agile Framework (Remote) (Office of the Chief Information Officer/IT Design & Development Directorate/Design Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will work with the User Experience (UX) Design Team and the Quality Assurance Team to develop an understanding of current business workflows, proposed workflows, and process analysis in support of the Library’s modernization efforts.

    Full Description: This quality assurance (QA) and testing project using Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) will give the Junior Fellow a firsthand look into the Library’s modernization efforts. The Junior Fellow will work with the User Experience (UX) Design Team and the Quality Assurance Team to get an understanding of current business workflows, proposed workflows, and the process of breaking down proposed workflows into smaller pieces. The Junior Fellow will work with the Agile Scrum teams to develop and deliver sprints (the smaller pieces) in the QA role. In this role they will develop and execute manual and automated test cases to ensure the quality of each sprint. The Junior Fellow will learn to use designated tools to develop, execute, and report their findings for the modernization effort assigned.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Skill with any programming language; basic understanding of the software development lifecycle and software quality assurance.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Experience with modernization efforts.

  10. 9-1-1 Services in Rural and Remote Regions (Remote) (Congressional Research Service/Resources, Science, & Industry Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will have the opportunity to develop key research and writing skills, examine models of 9-1-1 services in remote and rural regions, and document challenges that these regions face in providing 9-1-1 services.

    Full Description: In this remote project in the Congressional Research Service (CRS), the Junior Fellow will have the opportunity to develop key skills by researching laws via Congress.gov, regulations via the Federal Register, and writing skills to present findings in service to Congress. This project is designed to examine models of 9-1-1 in remote and rural regions, document challenges that these regions face in providing 9-1-1 services, and develop a short paper on this important topic that affects individuals and community across the nation. The project requires an interest in public policies, public safety and response systems, and interpersonal/professional skills for working with CRS analysts and 9-1-1 experts. The Junior Fellow will meet with analysts and experts to learn about 9-1-1 services, attend 9-1-1 webinar series, develop a timeline of laws and regulations related to 9-1-1, plus identify and read 9-1-1 reports and research. As a result of this project, Congress and the public will have increased access to pertinent information on this critical issue facing Americans today.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Research, reading, writing, Excel, Word, PowerPoint; ability and willingness to learn about new 9-1-1 technologies and services.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Researching laws and regulations. Any public safety experience.

  11. The Legacy of Daniel A.P. Murray: Mapping the Stories (Remote) (Office of the Librarian/ Office of Communications)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will research the history of Daniel A.P. Murray and his historical relevance to the Library’s efforts in telling the stories of African-American contributions to the nation’s legacy via a story map and Display Day project.

    Full Description: In this remote internship, the Junior Fellow will research the history of Daniel A.P. Murray and his historical relevance to the Library’s efforts in telling the stories of African-American contributions. Building upon this research, the Junior Fellow will research the vast exhibitions and online collections, beginning in 1950 to present day, with a focus on identifying and highlighting items from underrepresented and communities of color. A story map and Display Day project will outline and identify these stories that will be integrated into the ongoing efforts of the Of the People: Widening the Path initiative. This project supports the Office of Communications' efforts to identify and catalog the various cultural and ethnic-based exhibits and collections presented over the past 60 years. This will additionally support the efforts of the ongoing Of the People: Widening the Path initiative by documenting continuous efforts to support storytelling by, and of, communities of color.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Research, including spreadsheet development; attention to detail; writing and editing, including knowledge of Associated Press Style. In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Interviewing.

  12. Archiving the National Book Festival (Remote) (Office of the Librarian/Office of Communications/Signature Programs Office)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will provide an opportunity to learn and contribute to the inner workings of planning a major festival featuring both in-person and virtual components that expand the events impact for the public via podcasts, story maps, and blog posts.

    Full Description: The Library of Congress National Book Festival (NBF) is a premier national book event, drawing highly acclaimed authors and thousands of attendees. This project will expose the Junior Fellow(s) to the inner workings of planning a major festival with both in-person and virtual components for a government agency. The purpose of the project is to create documentation and collateral materials for the Festival in order to enhance the attendee experience, while focusing on Library operations and understanding Library users. Project work entails identifying key sections of content and reorganizing material into more easily digestible forms (e.g. a series of podcasts, story maps, blog posts), and adding metadata and additional descriptive materials. Additionally, the Junior Fellow(s) will produce at least one of the following deliverables: recommendations for revamping the National Book Festival Website; a series of NBF podcasts; recommendations for content, programming, sponsorship, and more; and creation of collateral. The Junior Fellow(s) will have the opportunity to attend Festival meetings as well as the Festival.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Ability to work effectively and efficiently with others; communicate orally and in writing; apply basic project management principles, concepts, and methodologies; plan, organize, and execute work within specified deadlines; work autonomously and use critical thinking; and knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Knowledge of best practices in website management and knowledge of best practices in podcast creation.

  13. National Book Festival: Literary Programming (Remote) (Office of the Librarian/Literary Initiatives Office)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will support signature literary programs at the Library of Congress and develop additional public programming and projects.

    Full Description: The Literary Initiatives Office develops signature literary programs at the Library of Congress, including the National Book Festival, and administers literary ambassador positions such as the U.S. Poet Laureate, the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, and the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction. In this remote internship, the Junior Fellow will work directly on the Festival planning team to increase visibility, accessibility, and opportunities for these new voices to be amplified and shared with D.C.’s community of readers in all stages of life. The Junior Fellows Program aligns with the most crucial period for developing program content for the National Book Festival. From writing and editing session descriptions and author biographies, to organizing content for the Festival’s digital presence, to researching and assigning interest tags to sessions, the Junior Fellow will receive valuable training in arts administration while working on one of the country’s premier literary festivals and expanding engagement and access to Library programming for diverse audiences. Additional responsibilities include assisting with other public programming and projects by the Library’s literary ambassadors. The main subject areas of this services-oriented project are arts administration, literature, and digital media.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Strong organizational skills, with ability to set and meet deadlines; ability to communicate effectively in writing; advanced proficiency in use of computer software; excellent research skills; creative and organizational flexibility; use of Microsoft Excel, Google Sheets, or other spreadsheet software; basic knowledge of and comfort with entering data into content management systems.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Experience with data organization, visualization and analysis; experience with event organization. Contemporary literature; literary trends, especially in diversity and representation

  14. Culturally Relevant Pedagogy with LC Digital Collections (Remote) (Office of the Librarian/Professional Learning and Outreach Initiatives Office)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will create teaching materials that highlight items from digitized Library collections, suitable for use by (K–12) educators who wish to expand their instruction to include recognition of diverse communities.

    Full Description: In this remote internship within the Library of Congress (LC) Professional Learning and Outreach Initiatives, the Junior Fellow will create teaching materials that highlight items from digitized Library collections, suitable for use by (K–12) educators who wish to expand their instruction to include recognition of diverse communities. During the fall of 2022, two interns participating in the Archives, History and Heritage Advanced (AHHA) identified items from the Library’s collections that are suitable to support culturally relevant pedagogy in instruction delivered to primarily Black and other students of color.

    This summer internship will continue and expand this effort by identifying materials, feature members of a community, and explore diversity based on ethnicity, ability, and geographic location. After selecting relevant materials in the Library’s collections, the Junior Fellow will present primary source sets, conduct online discussions; and engage educators and representatives of the Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) Teacher Network (an online consortium with 13,000 members). This project will help realize the Of the People: Widening the Path goal to connect all Americans to a deeper and more enriched understanding of the country’s cultural record through K–12 educators across the nation.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Ability to conduct searches on loc.gov; ability to communicate with educators via a social media platform (TPS Teachers Network); knowledge of K–12 teaching and curricula; knowledge of the need for teaching materials focused on a specific population (ethnicity, ability, geographic placement, etc.).

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Ability to create learning activities Knowledge of culturally relevant pedagogy relating to underrepresented or communities of color.

  15. Copyright Card Catalog Metadata Capture Project (Remote) (US Copyright Office/Office of Copyright Records)

    In this project, the Junior Fellow will research U.S. Copyright Office historical records, gain experience working with metadata and contribute to the online discoverability of materials covering the nation’s cultural creativity.

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will research U.S. Copyright Office historical records, gain experience working with metadata and contribute to the online discoverability of materials covering the nation’s cultural creativity.

    Full Description: In this remote project, the Junior Fellow will review and update XML metadata for the U.S. Copyright Office (USCO) Card Catalog Records. The USCO Card Catalog provides an index to copyright registrations and other records pertaining to ownership of copyright works from 1870–1977. The Card Catalog contains records of registrations, assignments, transfers of copyright, notices of use of musical compositions, and terminations of copyright ownership. These records are available in hardcopy format and online, but access to the physical records is limited and online searching is cumbersome. A historically important snapshot of the culture of the United States is represented in the vast holding of records referring to books, photographs, musical compositions, sound recordings, motion pictures, lectures, software, and much more. The Junior Fellow will have the opportunity to learn about USCO’s historical records, gain experience working with metadata and contribute to the online discoverability of materials covering the nation’s cultural creativity via enhanced metadata in the Copyright Public Records System.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Knowledge of catalog, metadata, digital archiving; Microsoft Office Suite.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Experience with Microsoft Access.

The Junior Fellows Program is offering 14 Onsite Projects:

  1. Access for Newly Acquired Armenian-American Materials (Onsite) (Asian and Middle Eastern Division)

    Short Description: The Library is seeking a Junior Fellow to assist with processing the gift of 1,962 monographs and serials that were published in Armenia and in the diaspora to enhance online access and discoverability.

    Full Description: A prominent Armenian-American writer and journalist, Antranig Poladian, collected monographs reflecting his interpretation of the cultural record of Armenians in the United States. The Asian and Middle Eastern (ASME) Division is seeking a Junior Fellow to assist with processing the gift of his 1,962 monographs and serials that were published in Armenia and in the diaspora. The Library’s Poladian Collection is one of the most important in North America, covering the fields of Armenian history in general, medieval Armenia and its scholarship, and Armenian literature. The Junior Fellow will work on initial processing of Armenian-language monographs from America, searching for bibliographic records in OCLC and importing metadata. When pre-existing metadata is not available, the Junior Fellow will transcribe data from pieces in the collection. The project will create greater online access to monographs that reflect the experience of the Armenian diaspora in the United States housed in the African and Middle Eastern (AMED) Division.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Ability to read Armenian and transcribe Armenian text.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Knowledge of library operations.

  2. Inventory Review Protocols for Overseas Collection Materials (Onsite) (Preservation Services Division)

    In this project, the Junior Fellow will interview or shadow subject matter experts, staff, and contractors to develop quality assurance metrics for inventory and increase discoverability of material in Japanese, Korean, Arabic, and Cyrillic scripted languages and English.

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will interview or shadow subject matter experts, staff, and contractors to inventory and increase discoverability of material in Japanese, Korean, Arabic, and Cyrillic scripted languages, and also in English.

    Full Description: This project supports the intellectual discovery of and physical access to previously unbound and un-inventoried material in Japanese, Korean, Arabic, and Cyrillic scripted languages (as well as English), enabling discovery and use by researchers. As an example, from this material, the journal “al-Difa’ al-Lubnani” was inventoried and bound under this project, and is an Arabic journal from Lebanon focusing on the armed forces of Lebanon. In addition to supporting the acquisition of cultural materials via federal and international contracting processes, the intern has an opportunity to gain experience in components of the Library of Congress business process management including: inventory and preparation of serials; collections acquired on behalf of multiple internal client divisions; processes that identify extant data collection points; the exercise of quality control; and binding preparation program. The Junior Fellow will interview or shadow subject matter experts, staff, and contractors across several General and International Collections Directorate (GICD) and Preservation divisions. The Junior Fellow will learn the basics of inventory in Voyager acquisitions and cataloging modules, and tracking of binding preparation processes (in Voyager and ABLE binding preparation software), and interpret findings through reporting the processes that ensure that diverse cultural collections are available to Library readers and researchers.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Proficiency in Microsoft Office; interpersonal skills sufficient to allow interviews and interaction with diverse Library of Congress staff and contractors; effective writing skills; interest in library technical services.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Ability to transliterate a non-Latin script such as Arabic, Cyrillic, Hebraic. Experience in library technical services.

  3. Inventory of South Asian Language Serial Titles (Onsite) (Asian Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will enhance the discoverability and accessibility of the Asian Division’s South Asian serials titles in Bengali, Hindi, Gujarati, Marathi, Punjabi, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu, and other South Asian languages.

    Full Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will enhance the discoverability and accessibility of the Asian Division’s South Asian serials by inventorying the collection. The Asian Division (AD) holds approximately 3,500 serial titles in Bengali, Hindi, Gujarati, Marathi, Punjabi, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu, and other South Asian languages. Working with collections-oriented materials, the Junior Fellow will inventory serial issues in the Library’s Integrated Library System (ILS), adding item records and barcodes for item-level security where necessary, as well as, identifying gaps in holdings that inform needs for future acquisition. The Junior Fellow will learn how a large research library manages, reviews, and updates serial title holdings information to reflect the issues available on shelf. Ensuring that the bibliographic records have accurate holdings information will better inform all categories of users about the resources available at the Library of Congress. At the end of the project, the Junior Fellow will write an entry for the Library’s “Four Corners of the World” blog, either summarizing their work experience and/or using the serial collection to investigate, research, and present a topic of interest.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Intermediate level proficiency in Microsoft Office Suite, especially Word and Excel; demonstrable familiarity with South Asian Studies or the academic study of one or more South Asian countries (e.g., Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka) in any field or discipline. Basic reading knowledge of one or more South Asian languages.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Experience working in a public, research, or university library in any capacity. Experience in cataloging any type of library materials.

  4. Local History of U.S. Immigrant Communities, 1880-1924 (Onsite) (Researcher & Reference Services Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will conduct in-depth research on three to five specific immigrant communities and create a corresponding digital reference resource.

    Full Description: As new immigrants in the millions arrived in the United States during the years 1880–1925, immigrant communities emerged all across the country in configurations based on nationality, ethnicity, religion, occupation, and many other factors. A rich outpouring of all manner of publications soon followed. Through the lens of local and cultural history, the Junior Fellow will conduct in-depth research on three to five specific communities, including a substantial primary and secondary bibliographic and literature review. The Junior Fellow will collaborate across subject areas while also gaining experience related to: library research; bibliographic practices; collections development; and the creation of reference resources. This project’s deliverables will include: primary and secondary bibliographic surveys; literature reviews; creation of research guides (LibGuides); and blog posts (e.g., Today in History) for the Library’s website. Future impact of this project includes helping to center a more diverse set of U.S. resources within the nation’s cultural record.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Use of computer software including spreadsheets and word processing; basic understanding of historical and bibliographic research practices; ability to write clearly and consistently in English; attention to detail and willingness to learn; basic knowledge of cultural history approaches to the American past; basic knowledge of social science approaches (e.g., Sociology, Anthropology, Folklife) to immigrant and ethnic groups.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Familiarity or working knowledge of relevant areas (focus on 1880-1925) based on previous research, education, or first-hand experience.  Relevant areas include: non-English languages used by U.S. immigrant or ethnic groups; history of one or more U.S. immigrant groups; U.S. history with a focus on the history of immigration and ethnicity across time and place; and, cultural history or social sciences approaches to the American past (e.g., Sociology, Anthropology, Folklife). Familiarity with public history institutions such as museums, libraries, and archives. Familiarity with the history of reading, printing, and authorship in the U.S. context.

  5. Science and Business Pamphlet Collection (Onsite) (Science Technology and Business Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will organize and evaluate business and science material, analyze content, and develop a formal processing plan to increase the discoverability of overlooked, but more broadly, representative cultural records.

    Full Description: The Science, Technology, and Business Division has a large collection of unprocessed pamphlets that document American life from 1920 to the 1960s with themes of industrial productivity and technological innovations. The Junior Fellow will support the Library’s goal to connect all Americans to avenues for informed civic engagement by reviewing, selecting, and sharing content from this pamphlet collection to promote the discovery and use of these often overlooked, but more broadly, representative cultural records. Working with a project mentor and division specialists, the Junior Fellow will organize and evaluate business and science material, analyze content, and develop a formal processing plan. In addition, the Junior Fellow will review the material for science and business content, and search Library holdings to identify records and related materials that exist in the Library’s collection. Once inventoried, the Fellow will re-house the items in archival-quality enclosures, and work closely with the division’s preservation liaison to address preservation concerns. The Junior Fellow will write blog posts to highlight items or themes from this pamphlet collection, substantially increasing access for future readers and researchers.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Familiarity working with spreadsheets, using online catalogs and web discovery tools, and writing for a variety of audiences; academic study of and/or interest in U.S. history during the Great Depression through post-WW II era (1920s–1960’s).

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Collection processing experience. Creating or participating with the development of a process plan, collection strategy, or other types of collection development documents. Care and handling practices in regard to paper-based media. Understands the purpose of printed ephemera and its use in historical research. Knowledge of topics and events in the history of science or business in the United States during the 20th century.

  6. Digital Preservation: American Archive of Public Broadcasting (Onsite) (National Audio Visual Conservation Center)

    Short Description:In this project, the Junior Fellow will research and present materials documenting American political, social, and cultural history, and creativity produced by American public television and radio focusing on underrepresented communities in local news and cultural programming.

    Full Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow explores the work of digital preservation within the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) onsite at the National Audiovisual Conservation Center (NAVCC) in Culpeper, Virginia. The AAPB is a rich source of materials documenting American political, social, and cultural history, and creativity produced by American public television and radio over the past 70 years. Within this material are several collections featuring diverse audiences that will be available for the Junior Fellow to research, including from KVZK (American Samoa), WIPR (Puerto Rico), Radio Bilingue, and KYUK (Anchorage, Alaska). This content includes local news and cultural programming that reflect the important issues of the time, and inform how those communities viewed themselves and the world around them.

    Guided by a project mentor, the Junior Fellow will learn preservation workflows, best practices for digital preservation of both moving image and sound recordings, and assist with ongoing work to digitize the Library’s own analog collection of Public Broadcasting Service/National Educational Television (PBS/NET) material.

    The Junior Fellow will review the content of the collection, and select files that are appropriate for inclusion in the AAPB Online Reading Room, and have the opportunity to create a finding aid for the AAPB website with the goal of ensuring historical individuals from communities of color are written into the historical record.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Skills in Microsoft Word and Excel; familiarity with the programming language Python; ability to work collegially in a team environment; strong research and writing skills; excellent organization skills; detail oriented; flexibility to adapt to procedures not covered by standards; interest in public media programming; ability to lift up to 40 lbs; familiarity with digital preservation best practices in A/V archiving; knowledge of digital audio and moving image formats; collections processing experience; interest in the history of public media programming.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Familiarity with A/V preservation workflows and software; experience in processing moving image and/or sound collections; project management experience; experience with writing Python and executing commands using Command Line. Knowledge of public media history and its role in uncovering the stories of underrepresented communities.

  7. Universal Music Group Collection Lacquer Processing (Onsite) (National Audio Visual Conservation Center)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will connect the public to the history of sound recording technologies, enrich their understanding of music industry developments by create metadata for unprocessed audio and manuscript items in the Universal Music Group Collection.

    Full Description: In this onsite project, guided by a project mentor, the Junior Fellow will create metadata for unprocessed audio and manuscript items in the Universal Music Group Collection and gain experience with conservation, item arrangement, and description. This collection is comprised of more than 200,000 historic master music recordings—many long out of print or never released—including metal and glass discs covered in lacquered recording surfaces, and mono tapes representing the works of seminal artists such as Louis Armstrong, Bing Crosby, Tommy Dorsey, Billie Holiday, the Andrews Sisters, Jimmy Dorsey, the Mills Brothers, Guy Lombardo, Ella Fitzgerald, Judy Garland, and Dinah Washington. Additionally, this internship incorporates tasks for various collections across many subject areas that could span any topics that can be captured on audio formats. The Junior Fellow will work on various pre-processing tasks, such as creating inventories, researching information, and performing conservation treatments, as well as, describing items in our collections management software. The Junior Fellow will also gain experience, guided by various section staff, in: sound recording formats; covering collections identification and handling; and sound recording copyright and preservation issues. This project helps the Library of Congress to connect the public to the history of sound recording technologies, enrich their understanding of music industry developments, and explore the decision-making process and research behind what and why certain recordings were released.

    This collections-oriented, hands-on project will be conducted onsite at the National Audiovisual Conservation Center (NAVCC) in Culpeper, Virginia.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Basic computer skills, including familiarity with Excel; interest in sound recordings; knowledge of music.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Experience in processing and/or describing audio materials; archival experience Knowledge: Recording Industry History

  8. Elizabeth Brown Pryor Internship, Manuscript Reading Room (Onsite) (Manuscript Reading Room)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will assist researchers accessing the Manuscript Division's collections by responding to reference inquiries received in person and by electronic means; analyze, investigate, and provide timely responses to reference requests and create guides that enhance discoverability that reflect the diversity of history, culture, and people represented in the Manuscript Division holdings.

    Full Description: Overseeing a collection of approximately 70 million primary source materials relating to American history and culture, the Manuscript Reading Room is a service-oriented focal point for members of Congress and their staff, the academic community, journalists, genealogists, and the general public conducting research in American history and culture. The division’s Elizabeth Brown Pryor Internship, supported through a generous bequest of a long-time Library researcher, introduces the selected Junior Fellow to the principles, concepts, and techniques of archival management and reference. The Junior Fellow will assist researchers in accessing the division's collections by responding to reference inquiries received in person and by electronic means; analyzing reference requests; investigating sources of information; and providing timely responses. In doing so, the fellow will learn the extent and scope of finding aids available to staff and researchers, and develop proficiency in LibApps, including Ask-A-Librarian, LibCal, and LibInsight. The Junior Fellow will promote the discovery and use of collections via the creation of LibGuides, Manuscript Collections research guides, handouts, tutorials, and other deliverables that reflect the diversity of history, culture, and people represented in the Manuscript Division holdings.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Ability to prioritize work and meet deadlines; ability to communicate effectively in writing; ability to think critically and propose resolutions to problems; ability to work effectively and collaboratively in a team setting; and, demonstrated knowledge of American history and culture.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Experience working in a research library environment. Preferred knowledge of integrated library systems, basic library applications, and other information technologies.

  9. Mary Wolfskill Internship, Manuscript Reading Room (Onsite) (Manuscript Reading Room)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will assist researchers accessing the Manuscript division's collections by responding to reference inquiries received in person and by electronic means; analyze investigate and provide timely responses to reference requests and create guides that enhance discoverability that reflect the diversity of history, culture, and people represented in the Manuscript Division holdings.

    Full Description:Overseeing a collection of approximately 70 million primary source materials relating to American history and culture, the Manuscript Reading Room is a service-oriented focal point for members of Congress and their staff, the academic community, journalists, genealogists, and the general public conducting research in American history and culture. The division’s Mary Wolfskill Trust Fund Internship, established in honor of a former longtime head of Reference & Reader Services, introduces the selected Junior Fellow to the principles, concepts, and techniques of archival management and reference. The Junior Fellow will assist researchers in accessing the division's collections by: responding to reference inquiries received in person and by electronic means; analyzing reference requests; investigating sources of information; and, providing timely responses. The Junior Fellow may also work on special projects that improve researcher access to the materials, including LibGuides and Manuscript Collections research guides, and assist in developing new deliverables, such as handouts and tutorials, that aid access to the collections. The Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for a program-wide exhibit presentation about diverse cultures and narratives represented in the Manuscript Division holdings.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Ability to prioritize work and meet deadlines; ability to communicate effectively in writing; ability to think critically and propose resolutions to problems; and, ability to work effectively and collaboratively in a team setting; Applicants are required to have demonstrated knowledge of American history and culture.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Experience working in a research library environment. Preferred knowledge of integrated library systems, basic library applications, and other information technologies.

  10. Martha Graham Legacy Project 2023 (Onsite) (Music Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will research and make discoverable materials from the McGehee-Umaña Papers spotlighting the Martha Graham Company, New York’s first multi-racial dance company.

    Full Description: Through the efforts of a Junior Fellow working onsite, the Martha Graham Legacy Project 2023 will make significant materials in the McGehee-Umaña Papers available for public access.

    The papers document the most influential figure in 20th-century, U.S. dance history, spotlight the Martha Graham Company as the first New York multi-racial dance company, and showcase the design contributions of Colombian artist Umaña. Martha Graham’s contributions span aesthetics, physical training, and choreographies that celebrate American landscapes and values, and influenced countless visual and performing artists. The Junior Fellow will make this multi-format collection available to the public by organizing the materials, creating a finding aid and coding it for online discovery, and participating in outreach activities to highlight the collection’s significance. The content of the collection—e.g., records of the company’s tours under State Department auspices, choreographic notes for Graham dances, costume and set designs, and correspondence and writings of Umaña and McGehee—contribute new information and primary sources that will invigorate the study of Graham, as well as, spur cross-disciplinary applications in historical and cultural studies and education theory.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: 1. Strong organizational skills (ability to set and meet deadlines, follow work plans, and adapt plans with team input as needed); ability to devise information searches using internet, databases, and/or library catalogs to find and verify information; ability to make connections between information from multiple sources (e.g., playbills, videos, reviews, photographs, diaries); basic computer/digital skills (e.g., data input, spreadsheet or template design, use of search fields) and willingness to learn how to use Library of Congress finding aid templates; flexibility in working independently to problem-solve, as well as, collaborating within a team; good communication skills; familiarity with social media applications, such as tagging and blogs; interest or experience in performing and/or visual arts (dance, theatre, music, design); curiosity about how arts heritage connects to other aspects of American historical and cultural studies.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Experience writing for diverse audiences. Experience in archival processing experience, or creation of finding aids would be helpful. Basic level of reading Spanish would be helpful.

  11. Enhancing Visibility: 19th Century American Music Manuscripts (Onsite) (Music Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will document the Music Division’s unparalleled collection of music manuscripts and make extant musical sources discoverable worldwide, increasing their visibility and discoverability for users across the nation and around the globe.

    Full Description: The Junior Fellow will working onsite on a project to research the Library of Congress Music Division’s unparalleled collection of music manuscripts by 19th and early 20th century American composers. The project will prioritize locating music manuscripts by Black, Indigenous, Hispanic or Latino, Asian American and Pacific Islander communities, and other communities of color, and reporting them to the online database RISM (Répertoire International des Sources Musicales, a.k.a., the International Inventory of Musical Sources). This database aims to comprehensively document extant musical sources worldwide, increasing their visibility and discoverability for users around the globe. Collaborating with Music Division staff, the Junior Fellow will search the Library’s vast collections using bibliographic tools in print and online; assess the physical items; encode music incipits; and create original records in the RISM catalog database that shares the nation's musical legacy.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Critical thinking in using multiple bibliographic tools; ability to organize data using Excel; ability to read music; background in music history.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Music encoding; knowledge of 19th-century American music.

  12. Paul Marvin Rudolph Architectural Archive (Onsite) (Prints and Photographs Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will enhance the description of photographs and drawings in the archive of globally-renowned architect Paul M. Rudolph (1918–1997) to help bring diverse perspectives into the ongoing conversations about Rudolph’s building design.

    Full Description: In this onsite project, two Junior Fellows will enhance the description of photographs and drawings in the archive of globally-renowned architect Paul M. Rudolph (1918–1997). His buildings are both celebrated and controversial, and some have already been demolished. Among Rudolph’s most famous designs are: a master plan for the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama; the Cocoon House in Sarasota, FL; the Yale Art & Architecture school; the Boston Government Service Center; and office towers in Asia. This hands-on, collections-oriented project involves looking at original visual materials, and consulting published reference sources in order to add information about the design projects and the individual documents. The enriched descriptions will help improve access to cultural records, and broaden avenues for civic engagement. Additionally, the project will expand knowledge of a major modernist architect’s work, and will help bring diverse perspectives into the ongoing conversations about Rudolph’s building designs, many of which are major public facilities.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Command of Microsoft Suite (including Excel). Good time management, and writing skills.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Visual literacy. Basic knowledge of archival practice and visual materials; basic knowledge of architecture

  13. Artists and Archives (Onsite) (Rare Book and Special Collections Division)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will research Artist websites and materials from the Rare Book & Special Collections and help connect the public to a deeper understanding of the cultural record of American artistic practice over the past two centuries.

    Full Description: Over the past several decades the Rare Book & Special Collections division (RBSCD) has built one of the strongest book arts collections in the country. These collections are bolstered by archival collections in book arts that provide significant opportunities for research. In this onsite project, the Junior Fellow will work under the guidance of a project mentor, and in collaboration with RBSCD staff, to help process and promote archival material that will connect the public to a deeper understanding of the cultural record of American artistic practice over the last century. This project provides an opportunity for emerging library and archives professionals to gain hands-on experience with collection processing and promotion, and creating online finding aids and guides for archival material not currently available to the public. In addition, this internship will explore Artist Archives to increase visibility and discoverability for researchers, educators, and students interested in the art of printing and book production in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Note: Artists websites hold a wealth of important information about the works of art housed in RBSCD, including printmaking techniques, artistic collaboration, and content creation. Artist Archives are deeply connected to the creative process and studio practices of modern and contemporary American artists working in the genre of book arts, and document the nation’s cultural record.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Strong Command of Microsoft Suite (including Excel); modest familiarity with physical archival processing practices in a cultural heritage setting is preferred.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: A strong appreciation for modern art and visual culture, as well as an interest in learning more about fine press, artists’ book, and letterpress collections.

  14. Engaging Families at the Library of Congress (Onsite) (Office of the Librarian/Informal Learning Office)

    Short Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will explore interests in museum education and informal learning environments, experience working with primary sources, and classwork or experience in education using the vast collections of the Library of Congress.

    Full Description: The Junior Fellow working in this onsite position will engage families visiting the Library and will assist in the development of a new experiential learning space in the Library of Congress’s Thomas Jefferson building, the Southwest Corridor (SWC). The SWC will be a user-driven, flexible, and participatory space for diverse inter-generational family groups and school groups, with a focus on ages 9–13, to foster both civic skills and research skills. This project will involve collections content, and will support the operations of the Informal Learning Office. Tasks will include identifying content for interactives, engaging families in the Library’s Young Readers Center and Programs Lab, and researching informal learning practices including benchmarking studies of similar programs at cultural institutions. This internship is ideal for a student who has an interest in museum education and informal learning environments, experience working with primary sources, and classwork or experience in education. By developing these resources, the Junior Fellow will help realize the Library’s goal to support diverse audiences, including learners of all ages. Using diverse Library of Congress collections that are relevant to children, the Junior Fellow will help realize the Of the People: Widening the Path goal to connect all Americans to a deeper and more enriched understanding of the country’s cultural record.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge required: Ability to interact with young audiences, particularly children ages 9–13yo; background in humanities or education.

    Skills/Knowledge preferred: Experience conducting research in an archival setting.

Junior Fellows Program Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is GS 3 pay?

    This position is paid at the GS 3 level. You will be paid at the rate for the locality in which you will conduct your work.

  2. What is my actual schedule?

    Fellows work a fulltime 8 hours/day, 40-hour/week schedule (two weeks equal a single pay period). For this reason, when determining the schedule to be worked, you will log off 8.5 hours after starting. With Project Mentor prior discussion and approval, Fellows may adjust their schedule within the Pay Period. Fellows must be available to complete the majority of their work within the Junior Fellows Program Core Hours: Monday-Friday, 6:30 am - 6:00 pm Eastern Time.

  3. I am not available to start the internship on the specified date, am I still eligible?

    No. The schedule and the length of the internship direct that we require all Junior Fellows Program 2023 interns to report on the same day. This also allows the cohort to be provided critical information required in orientation to all participants.

  4. I will be living overseas during the summer of 2023. Can I still apply?

    No. Interns must be located in the U.S. and its territories for the entire duration of the internship.

  5. Is a background check required?

    If you are selected, a background check will be required. You will be contacted by the Library’s Personnel Security Division with directions detailing how to proceed. Follow the directions carefully and complete required tasks within deadlines. Late submissions will impact the onboarding process and/or result in disqualification.

  6. Do I need to provide a transcript?

    Yes. Your transcript and/or registrar document will be required to verify your eligibility for consideration and hire. MUST be currently enrolled in a degree-granting program of study at an accredited institution of higher learning at the undergraduate level (college, university, or tribal college), or graduate level, AND/OR graduating in the months of December 1, 2022 - June 30, 2023. Unofficial copies of transcripts are acceptable at time of application.

    NOTE: All transcripts and/or registrar documents must be in PDF file format. Image files, Word documents, etc. are not acceptable.

    Failure to provide any proof of enrollment will result in disqualification from consideration.

  7. If I am interested in applying to more than one project, how do I do I do that?

    You can only work on one project for this internship. If you apply for a remote project and an onsite project and receive offers for both, you will need to choose one. Submit only one application package per format. If you are interested in both remote and onsite projects, you must submit separate applications for each. In the onsite and the online application Vacancy Questions, you will be asked to select your three top project choices within the selected format (remote or onsite) and describe how your education, experience, interests and/or training align with your selected projects. Note: If you apply for a remote project and an onsite project and receive offers for both, you will need to choose one. You can only be selected for one project (either remote or onsite).

    • Submit only one application package per format.

      If you are interested in remote and onsite projects, you must submit separate applications for each. Note that you can only be selected for one project (either remote or onsite).

    • You can only work on one project for this internship.

      NOTE: If you apply for a remote project and an onsite project and receive offers for both, you will need to choose one.

  8. How competitive is the Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program?

    Based on our experience with other fellowship programs offered here at the Library of Congress, we expect this to be a highly competitive program with a large number of applications from very qualified and motivated students. Therefore, we must strictly adhere to the requirements for application packages and the deadline for their submission. Interested applicants are encouraged to carefully and thoroughly read the vacancy announcement for the best understanding of the eligibility criteria, application requirements and procedures, and other important information.

  9. What are the selecting officials looking for in the application?

    Selecting officials may consider course selection, work experience, language skills, and interests related to the various subject areas noted on the announcement.

  10. Do you provide housing or transportation?

    No. Remote projects are designed to allow work from home. Onsite projects require your ability to commute to the designated Library of Congress worksite – the Main Campus in Washington DC or the Packard Campus in Culpeper VA – to conduct work duties.

  11. What is the location for this internship?

    Remote projects are conducted by the Junior Fellow using their personal device(s) and special software that provides a virtual desk top.

    Onsite projects will be completed within the Library’s Capitol Hill campus. Depending on the project, interns will work in one of these four buildings:

    • Jefferson Building: 10 First Street SE, Washington, DC
    • Adams Building: 120 Second Street SE, Washington, DC
    • Madison Building: 101 Independence Avenue SE, Washington, DC
    • Packard Campus: 19053 Mt Pony Rd, Culpeper, VA 22701
  12. How many academic credits do I receive in the program?

    The Library of Congress is not an academic institution and does not grant course credits. However, you may check with your school about receiving credits for your internship if interested.

  13. Can my internship lead to a full-time job?

    The internships come with no guarantee for permanent employment. However, we encourage those interested in careers at the Library of Congress to look at all job opportunities listed on the USAJOBS website and the Library’s Careers website. The new skills and experience gained during your time at the Library can be used as a stepping stone and the supervisor of your internship can be a valuable reference for your future job searches.

  14. Will these internships be offered in the Fall/Winter?

    No. This is a summer internship program only.

    For additional information about internships and fellowships at the Library of Congress, visit the Internship and Fellowship Program portal: https://www.loc.gov/ifp. Click on the Overview tab to explore other internships at the Library of Congress.

  15. What should I include in my federal resume?

    • Dates, hours, level of experience and examples for each work experience.
    • Volunteer work and roles in community organizations.
    • Numbers, percentages, and/or dollars that highlight your accomplishments.

    Find more details and guidance here:
    USAJOBS Help Center | What should I include in my federal resume? External link