U.S. Citizen Junior Fellows Program 2022 (May 23, 2022 – July 29, 2022)

  • Hosting Service Unit: All Library of Congress
  • Program Contact: juniorfellows@loc.gov
  • Interests/Areas of Study: STEM; Collections Conservation and Preservation; Law; Business; Humanities, Art and Culture; Library Information Science; Communications; Chemistry and Science; Congressional Relations; Geography and Maps; Government and Business Administration; Information Technology; Legislative Information; Policy Analysis; Public Relations; Cataloguing; Copyright; Digital Stewardship; Education; Finance; Outreach; Project & Project Management; Research; Web Services
  • Citizenship: U.S. Citizen
  • Application Period: Annually
  • Application Notes: See below for: A. General FAQ on all the programs available at the Library; B. Specific FAQ on the Junior Fellows Program; C. Specific information on the program including project descriptions D. Apply for the 2022 internship at USAjobs.gov https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/616600900 NOTE: The application period for the 2022 Junior Fellows Program has been extended to Monday, November 29, 2021 11:59 PM Eastern
  • Compensation: Compensation: $13.45 to $16.41 / per hour based on locality. Total for 10 weeks
  • Academic Credit: The Library does not provide academic credit, but you may arrange with your school in advance to receive credit.
  • Available Benefits: No Benefits
  • Program Duration: Short-term. May 23, 2022 – July 29, 2022. Summer 10-week internship appointment. Telework.
  • Qualifications: Currently enrolled undergraduate or graduate students, or those who have graduated between the months of December 2021- June 2022.
  • Frequently Asked Questions

Program Overview

The Library of Congress Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program enables undergraduate and graduate students to experience the integrated analog and digital collections and services of the world's largest, all-inclusive library. Working under the direction of Library curators and specialists in various divisions, fellows explore digital initiatives and increase access to the institution’s unparalleled collections and resources. Fellows are exposed to a broad spectrum of library work: copyright, preservation, reference, access, and information technology. In the past, summer fellows have identified hundreds of historical, literary, artistic, cinematic and musical gems representing the Library’s rich cultural, creative and intellectual assets. No previous experience is necessary, but fellowships are competitive and special skills or knowledge are usually desired. Selections are based on academic achievement, reference calls, and an interview with a selection official.  The program was converted to a remote program in 2020 and 2021. The program will be  remote  again in 2022.  The project descriptions below represent the projects offered in 2022.

Program Focus

The focus of the program is to increase access to special, legal and copyright collections, and to promote awareness and appreciation of the Library's services to researchers including Congressional members, scholars, students, teachers, and the general public. Fellows encourage the use of collections and services − ensuring that the Library of Congress is known as a living, dynamic center for scholarly work and connections. Program participants inventory, catalog, arrange, preserve, and research collections in varied formats, as well as assist in digital library initiatives. Upon completion of their assignments, fellows work closely with Library curators and specialists to plan and present a display of their most significant discoveries and accomplishments.

The 2022 Junior Fellows program is supported by a grant from the Mellon Foundation to the Library for a multiyear initiative to connect more deeply with Black, Hispanic, Indigenous and other minority communities by expanding its collections, using technology to enable storytelling, and offering more internship and fellowship opportunities. The initiative, Of the People: Widening the Path, creates new opportunities for more people to engage with the Library, thus weaving a more inclusive American story.

This initiative is part of a larger vision at the Library to connect with all Americans by inviting new generations of interns to participate in creating, preserving and sharing the nation’s cultural treasures and building on the Library’s commitment to collect and preserve more underrepresented perspectives and experiences.

The Junior Fellows summer intern program has been a signature initiative of the Library of Congress since 1991.The Junior Fellows Program is made possible by a gift from the late James Madison Council member Nancy Glanville Jewell through the Glanville Family Foundation and the Knowledge Navigators Trust Fund and by an investment from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The Junior Fellows Program offers a paid ten week virtual  internship for undergraduate and graduate students working with Library of Congress collections. The fellows explore digital initiatives and inventory, catalog, arrange, preserve and research a backlog of special, legal or copyright collections in many different formats. In 2022 the Junior Fellows Program will be operated as a remote (virtual) internship.

 

The application period for the 2022 Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program is currently planned for October 6, 2021 through November 8, 2021 NOTE: The application period for the 2022 Junior Fellows Program has been extended to Monday, November 29, 2021 11:59 PM Eastern. **The application is currently open. Please review the previous application at USAJOBS.gov at https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/616600900
Note:  Incomplete application packages will not be considered.
Note: The internship will be held May 23, 2022 – July 29, 2022.

Selection Process

Applications will be forwarded to selecting officials in the Library who will arrange telephone interviews with promising applicants, based on materials submitted. Letters of recommendation are not required for this application. After completion of the selection process those selected will be provided with detailed information on reporting for their fellowship.

The Library of Congress is an equal opportunity employer. Women, minorities, and persons with disabilities who meet eligibility requirements are strongly encouraged to apply.

Projects for 2022

  1. Content Development: Library of Congress Youth Center
  2. Literary Program Development
  3. Connecting Educators with Powerful Primary Sources
  4. The National Book Festival
  5. Mapping the Stories: The Legacy of Daniel A.P. Murray
  6. Supreme Court Justice Project
  7. Enhancing Access: Creative Digital Projects
  8. Enhancing Access: Libraries, Archives, Museums
  9. Enhancing Access: Higher Education
  10. Effective User Research at the Library of Congress
  11. IT Project Management Office Execution Roadmap
  12. Ensuring Access to Rights Restricted Digital Collections
  13. Strategic Planning and Updates for Digital File Formats
  14. Hispanic Americans in Business
  15. Allillanchu! Andean Stories
  16. Manuscript Division Reference and Resources
  17. Genealogy Outreach and Engagement
  18. Mapping Historical Demographics: Race and Inequality
  19. Carvalho Monteiro Collection
  20. Preservation: External Climate and Internal Building Climates
  21. Winning Hearts and Minds: Malay and Indonesian Titles
  22. Uncovering Poetry in African Languages
  23. Diving into Digital Ephemera: Enhancing Web Archives Access
  24. Online Exhibit Curation: American Archive of Public Broadcasting
  25. Metadata Enhancement and Remediation
  26. Collections Access: Leading Blind and Visually Impaired Musicians
  27. Copyright for Kids

 

Project Descriptions

Junior Fellows 2022 Projects

  1. Content Development: Library of Congress Youth Center (Office of the Librarian/Informal Learning Office)

    Short Description: This project supports development of a new experiential learning space in the Library of Congress. Project tasks include content support for interactives, working with content specialist liaisons to identify collections, and research on informal learning practices including benchmarking studies of similar programs at cultural institutions.

    Full Description: This project in the Library’s Informal Learning Office (ILO) will support development of a new, 5,700-square foot experiential learning space in the Library of Congress’s Thomas Jefferson building. The Southwest Corridor (SWC) will open in 2024 as part of a new set of visitor elements that include an orientation gallery and exhibition of Library treasures. The SWC will be a user-driven, flexible, and participatory space for intergenerational family groups and school groups, with a focus on ages 9-13. The Junior Fellow should have an interest in museum education and informal learning environments, experience working with primary sources, and classwork or experience in education. This project will involve collections content, and will support the operations of the ILO. Tasks might include content support for interactives, including working with content specialist liaisons to identify collections, and research on informal learning practices including benchmarking studies of similar programs at cultural institutions.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Experience with kids age 9-13: This can include teaching or student teaching, child care, working at a camp, or volunteering at museums or other youth-serving institutions.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Degree or classes (either graduate or undergraduate) in Education, including museum education; degree or classes (either graduate or undergraduate) in History; experience conducting research or using a research library or archives, including archival collections held at university libraries; experience working with a diverse array of youth.

  2. Literary Program Development (Office of the Librarian/Literary Initiatives Office)

    Short Description: This project will focus on developing and managing content for the Library’s National Book Festival. The Junior Fellow will write and edit author biographies, gather and organize content for the festival’s digital presence, and create and manage descriptive content for author presentations and literary ambassadors.

    Full Description: The Literary Initiatives Office develops signature literary programs at the Library of Congress, including the National Book Festival and National Book Festival Presents, and administers literary ambassador positions such as the U.S. Poet Laureate, Joy Harjo; the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, Jason Reynolds, and the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction winner, Colson Whitehead. The spring and summer months are the most crucial for developing and managing program content for the National Book Festival, which will be the primary focus of this internship. From writing and editing author biographies, to gathering and organizing content for the festival’s digital presence, to creating and managing descriptive content for author presentations, the Junior Fellow will receive valuable training in arts administration while working on one of the country’s premier literary festivals. Additional responsibilities include assisting with National Book Festival Presents (the Library’s new year-long literary series) and other public programming, and signature projects by the Library’s literary ambassadors.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Strong organizational skills, with ability to set and meet deadlines; ability to communicate effectively in writing; advanced proficiency in use of computer software; excellent research skills; basic knowledge of and comfort with inputting data into content management systems; creative and organizational flexibility.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Experience with data organization, visualization, and analysis.

  3. Connecting Educators with Powerful Primary Sources (Office of the Librarian/Professional Learning and Outreach Initiatives Office)

    Short Description: This project focuses on the development of an educational resource highlighting items from the historical collections of the Library of Congress related to civic engagement and social change and supporting teacher professional development and student exploration related to those collections.

    Full Description: The Professional Learning and Outreach Initiatives Office of the Library of Congress, as a service to the nation's K-12 educators and learners, provides materials and programs that support the effective classroom use and exploration of historical primary sources. The Junior Fellow will contribute to the development of an educational resource highlighting items from the historical collections of the Library of Congress related to civic engagement and social change and supporting teacher professional development and student exploration related to those collections. Duties could include conducting research on the topics; selecting online primary sources from the Library's collections for inclusion in the teacher resource; drafting text for background materials; and brainstorming promotional ideas for spreading the word about the resource in the K-12 educational community.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: The ability to conduct online research; writing for an educational audience; academic background in either U.S. history or K-12 education.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Ability to work well as part of a team; familiarity with current K-12 educational practices and issues; experience or interest in civic engagement and social change.

  4. The National Book Festival (Office of the Librarian/Signature Programs Office)

    Short Description: The purpose of the project is to create documentation and collateral for the Library of Congress National Book Festival in order to enhance the attendee experience, while focusing on Library operations and understanding Library users.

    Full Description: The Library of Congress National Book Festival is a premier national book event, drawing highly acclaimed authors and thousands of attendees. This project will expose the Junior Fellow(s) to the inner workings of planning a major festival with both in-person and virtual components for a government agency. The purpose of the project is to create documentation and collateral for the Festival in order to enhance the attendee experience, while focusing on Library operations and understanding Library users. Project work entails identifying key sections of content and reorganizing material into more easily digestible forms (e.g. a series of podcasts, StoryMaps, blog posts), and adding metadata and additional descriptive materials. Additionally, the Fellow(s) will produce at least one of the following deliverables: recommendations for revamping the National Book Festival Website; a series of NBF podcasts; recommendations for content, programming, sponsorship and more; and creation of collateral. The Junior Fellow(s) will have the opportunity to attend Festival meetings as well as the Festival.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Ability to work effectively and efficiently with others; communicate orally and in writing; apply basic project management principles, concepts and methodologies; plan, organize, and execute work within specified deadlines; work autonomously and use critical thinking; and knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of best practices in website management and knowledge of best practices in podcast creation.

  5. Mapping the Stories: The Legacy of Daniel A.P. Murray (Office of Communication)

    Short Description: This project focuses on researching and interpreting the history of Daniel A.P. Murray and his historical relevance to the Library’s efforts in telling the stories of African-American contributions.

    Full Description: The Junior Fellow will research the history of Daniel A.P. Murray and his historical relevance to the Library’s efforts in telling the stories of African-American contributions. Building upon this research, the fellow will research the vast exhibitions and online collections from 1950 to the present day, with a focus on identifying and highlighting items from underrepresented and communities of color. A story map and display day project will outline and identify these stories, and will be integrated into the ongoing efforts of the “Of the People” initiative.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Writing and editing, including knowledge of Associated Press Style; research skills, including spreadsheet development; attention to detail.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Experience in research or writing relating to underrepresented or communities of color, particularly African-American.

  6. Supreme Court Justice Project (Congressional Research Service/American Law Division)

    Short Description: This project will augment the Congressional Research Service (CRS)’s ongoing effort to modernize the Constitution Annotated. The Junior Fellow(s) will prepare biographies of selected Supreme Court Justices and brainstorm how the Library’s digital materials can be used to enhance constitution.congress.gov to make the Constitution more accessible to college students.

    Full Description: The Supreme Court Justice Project will augment the Congressional Research Service (CRS)’s ongoing effort to modernize the Constitution Annotated, a document that federal law requires the Librarian of Congress to prepare. Currently, the online Constitution Annotated’s Table of Supreme Court Justices identifies only basic information for each Supreme Court Justice. CRS’s long-term plan for the Table, however, has been to link each Justice to a more detailed biography, which will enable website users to contextualize the Justice’s jurisprudence in light of the Justice’s personal background and the historical period in which the Justice worked. Additionally, the biography will include images from or links to Library materials that are pertinent to the Justice, the Justice’s decisions, or the era in which the Justice lived. The Junior Fellow(s) will assist CRS by preparing biographies of Supreme Court Justices and by brainstorming how the Library’s digital materials can be used to enhance constitution.congress.gov to make the Constitution more accessible to college students.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: An interest in cutting edge work on constitutional and Supreme Court history or the digital humanities; currently in an undergraduate or graduate program with a focus on history or law; strong writing skills and the ability to write for a general audience; and the ability to conduct online research.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Ability to work well as part of a team; passion for constitutional law and Supreme Court history; familiarity with user experience concepts in website design.

  7. Enhancing Access: Creative Digital Projects (Office of the Chief Information Officer/Digital Strategy Directorate)

    Short Description: This project will involve the creative re-use and re-mixing of digital materials from the Library of Congress towards the creation of new digital exhibits, publications, or works of art that center the lives, experiences and perspectives of communities of color.

    Full Description: The four-year Connecting Communities Digital Initiative (CCDI) within the Digital Strategy Directorate was established as part of the “Of the People: Widening the Path” initiative. With a focus on using technology to enable storytelling, this project will involve the creative re-use and re-mixing of digital materials from the Library of Congress towards the creation of new digital exhibits, publications, or works of art that center the lives, experiences and perspectives of communities of color. Fellows in this program may do research to support larger projects, or may undertake individual or joint projects, dependent on their interests and the needs of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Experience working with communities of color; knowledge of cultural heritage materials, in general, and of some uses of digital library materials in new forms; basic technology and design skills.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Advanced technology skills such as facility with web development, use of APIs, data manipulation, digital humanities or related fields; and advanced design skills. Experience in creative projects relating to underrepresented or communities of color.

  8. Enhancing Access: Libraries, Archives, Museums (Office of the Chief Information Officer/Digital Strategy Directorate)

    Short Description: This project will involve the creative re-use of digital materials from the Library of Congress to support the needs of a local library, archive, museum or community archive.

    Full Description: The four-year Connecting Communities Digital Initiative (CCDI) within the Digital Strategy Directorate was established as part of the “Of the People: Widening the Path” initiative. This project will involve the creative re-use of digital materials from the Library of Congress to support the needs of a local library, archive, museum or community archive. Applicants with existing relationships with a local collecting institution (such as a local public library or local museum) may use this internship to connect LC materials with local materials. Applicants without those connections may support the goals of the Libraries, Archives, and Museums sector through research and report writing.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Experience working with and coursework related to the histories of communities of color in the United States; knowledge of digital library practices.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Previous work experience with digital materials in a library, museum, or archival setting.

  9. Enhancing Access: Higher Education (Office of the Chief Information Officer/Digital Strategy Directorate)

    Short Description: This project will involve the creative re-use and re-mixing of digital materials from the Library of Congress to extend coursework or to create new learning tools in support of the program’s mission.

    Full Description: The four-year Connecting Communities Digital Initiative (CCDI) within the Digital Strategy Directorate was established as part of the “Of the People: Widening the Path” initiative. This project will involve the creative re-use and re-mixing of digital materials from the Library of Congress to extend coursework or to create new learning tools in support of the program’s mission. Fellows in this program may do research to support larger projects, or may undertake individual or joint projects connected to their own course of study, dependent on their interests and the needs of the program.

    Full Description (archived original): The Library of Congress was awarded an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant titled “Of the People: Widening the Path” to fund a new, multi-part initiative to connect more deeply with Indigenous, Black, Hispanic, and other communities of color by exposing grantees to the Library’s expansive collections, using technology to enable storytelling and offering more internship and fellowship opportunities. Part of that grant establishes the four-year Connecting Communities Digital Initiative (CCDI) within the Digital Strategy Directorate. This summer project will involve the creative re-use and re-mixing of digital materials from the Library of Congress to extend coursework or to create new learning tools in support of the program’s mission. Fellows in this program may do research to support larger projects, or may undertake individual or joint projects connected to their own course of study, dependent on their interests and the needs of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Experience working with and coursework related to the histories of communities of color in the United States; strong writing skills.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Experience developing learning materials for others such as guides, tutorials, or other tools.

  10. Effective User Research at the Library of Congress (Office of the Chief Information Officer/IT/Design)

    Short Description: Effective user research continues to be an important activity at the Library to better understand our user communities and our employees. The Junior Fellow will engage with Library staff to understand the current landscape for products and services, conduct best practices research and build a framework for applying user research throughout the Library.

    Full Description: Effective user research continues to be an important activity at the Library to better understand our user communities and our employees. The Junior Fellow will engage with Library staff to understand the current landscape for products and services, conduct best practices research and build a framework for applying user research throughout the Library. This activity will serve as a way for a Junior Fellow to learn more about designing and developing digital products using best practices, and how to use user research to build approaches that are truly user-centered. After gathering background information about the current processes, standards, and implementations of user research at the Library, the Fellow will work with a variety of stakeholders to create a framework for Library products. This project will give the Fellow a unique view of the work of cross-functional groups and the practice of user research to design impactful products and services.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Candidate must have good time management, interviewing skills, and organizational skills. Candidate should be familiar with how to communicate visually, although they can use templates for the creation of visual elements.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Familiarity with user research concepts, product design concepts, and how to create journey maps and/or process diagrams.

  11. IT Project Management Office Execution Roadmap (Office of the Chief Information Officer/ Project Management Office)

    Short Description: The Junior Fellow will coordinate and collaborate with the Office of the Chief Information Officer, Library-wide directorates and divisions to ensure quality and compliance of set guidelines within the agency’s digital environment. The Junior Fellow will be involved in tracking findings and reviewing and maintaining an execution roadmap, project schedule, and an internal website.

    Full Description: This project will assist the Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) in its efforts to ensure that Project Managers are executing to established guidelines consistently and with quality. This is a critical building block as the Library continues to progress to future higher-order management (e.g., developing IMSs for sets of connected programs/projects). OCIO will create a Project Management Office (PMO) Execution Roadmap to communicate the work necessary to ensure quality and compliance of execution to PMO guidelines. The scope of the project work will require coordination and collaboration with internal OCIO and Library-wide directorates and divisions to identify roadmap interdependencies to track the full extent of all activities over Fiscal Years 2022 – 2026. The Junior Fellow’s responsibilities will include continued review and maintenance of the PMO Execution Roadmap, tracking to GAO/OIG Audit findings, and maintenance of the risk register, project schedule, Jira/Kanban board, and the PMO Confluence website. In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Skills in Project Management, PMLC, Confluence, Jira, Agile and Kanban methodology, MS Office Suite, MS Project, Risk Registry; attention to detail, oral/written communication, and problem solving; business process improvement and roadmap development capabilities.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of project management principles; effective oral/written communication, time management, problem-solving, and customer service skills; soft skills; ability to manage multiple projects/tasks.

  12. Ensuring Access to Rights Restricted Digital Collections (Library Services/Digital Collection Management & Services Division)

    Short Description: Stacks, the Library’s platform for accessing rights-restricted content, has allowed Library staff to provide secure onsite access to a variety of digital formats. The Junior Fellow will help to enhance discoverability and accessibility of the digital content in Stacks by conducting systematic reviews, downloading any missing titles, compiling required metadata, and ensuring completeness of digital collections in Stacks for users.

    Full Description: Stacks, the Library’s platform for accessing rights-restricted content, has allowed Library staff to provide secure onsite access to a variety of digital formats, including tens of thousands of ePrint newspapers, eJournals, and eBooks covering a wide variety of subject areas, recommending divisions, and languages. The Junior Fellow will help to enhance discoverability and accessibility of the digital content in Stacks in a variety of ways. The Junior Fellow will conduct a systematic review of the content available in both Stacks and known Library-owned or affiliated systems such as the Delivery Management System or vendor websites. This includes downloading any titles missing from Stacks but available in the identified systems. Additionally, the Junior Fellow will compile the required metadata to provide access to any missing titles in Stacks. Due to the nature of this work, the project is both collections-oriented and services-oriented, as the Junior Fellow will ensure the completeness of digital collections in Stacks for all Stacks users.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Ability to plan, organize, and execute work with specified deadlines; communicate effectively orally and in writing; use computerized search tools, databases, and functions; and ability to use information systems.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of: MARC fields; UNIX commands; digital content lifecycle; and knowledge of Python.

  13. Strategic Planning and Updates for Digital File Formats (Library Services/Digital Collection Management & Services Division)

    Short Description: The Junior Fellow will use the Sustainability of Digital Formats resource to help collate and update information on specific file formats, conduct original technical research, expand a user research model and assist with longer range strategic planning.

    Full Description: The Sustainability of Digital Formats (https://www.loc.gov/preservation/digital/formats/index.html) Web site is the world’s leading resource for information and analysis on 530+ digital file formats across a wide range of content categories. The resource evaluates file formats’ ability to preserve information according to a defined list of sustainability factors. First started in 2004, the site yields an average of 40,000 unique visitors each month and is foundational to digital preservation work across the Library including strong integration with the Recommended Formats Statement. The Junior Fellow will help collate and update information on specific file formats, concentrating on formats prioritized by service units, and assist with longer range strategic planning. Specifically, the Junior Fellow will conduct original technical research for high priority formats, update broken URLs and expand a user research model. This will involve conducting external user surveys and developing user profiles to better understand how the Sustainability of Digital Formats can best met the needs of the international file format research community.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Strong attention to detail, collaboration, interest in technical file format documentation and specifications, excellent research skills, ability to understand and parse detailed technical information.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Experience with XML and HTML, experience with conducting structured interviews and surveys, familiarity with file format research projects, tools and resources, experience authoring project documentation.

  14. Hispanic Americans in Business (Library Services/Science Technology and Business Division)

    Short Description: The Hispanic Americans in Business project will use the Library’s online collections and resources to develop content that aids researchers with discovery and access to the Library’s collections. The Junior Fellow will focus on identifying content for a research guide and blog posts related to Hispanic Americans in business.

    Full Description: This project will use the Library’s online collections and resources to develop content related to “Hispanic Americans in Business.” Potential research topics focus on Hispanic American entrepreneurs, business associations, data & statistics, press & publishing, biography, and small businesses. The focus on small businesses could include research on the U.S. Hispanic population in relation to the following: banking; construction; health care and social assistance; science and technology; housing/real estate; entertainment; retail trades; food services, government service; and military service. The project will also develop tools and content to engage and aid researchers with discovery and access to the Library’s collections on Hispanic Americans in business. Additionally, the Junior Fellow will be responsible for identifying content for a research guide and blog posts.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Solid research and writing skills.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Prior knowledge or experience with LibGuides software. Experience in research or writing relating to underrepresented or communities of color, particularly Hispanic communities. Knowledge of Spanish may be helpful.

  15. Allillanchu! Andean Stories at the Library of Congress (Library Services/Latin American, Caribbean and European Division)

    Short Description: This project will surface collections that represent the rich and vast cultural heritage of the United States in connection to the Latin American countries. The Junior Fellow will conduct research to create storytelling projects to expand indigenous study engagement with the collections at the Library of Congress.

    Full Description: The goal of this project is to help surface collections that represent the rich cultural heritage of the United States in connection to Latin American countries. Native American communities in the U.S. have strong connections with Andean countries; nevertheless, this connection is not currently discoverable in the Library’s website. The Junior Fellow will conduct research with the Library’s digital collections to create storytelling projects using ArcGIS Story Maps and/or LibGuides platforms. The Story Map and/or LibGuide will include resources in multiple formats to expand indigenous studies engagement with the collections. The Junior Fellow’s projects will help design and expand the unheard voices of these collections where some of them are currently in different indigenous languages (ex. Quechua, Aymara), but not easily available to patrons. This project is a continuation of the Hispanic Reading Room efforts to create digital tools and resources for social impact that help share a more inclusive story of the greater American experience.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Knowledge or familiarity with one or more Andean region languages (Quechua, Aymara, and related linguistic families) as well as Spanish; experience with Caribbean and Latin American studies; experience with digital storytelling techniques, ArcGIS Story Maps and/or LibGuides platforms; experience or willingness to learn metadata and transcription skills and procedures applicable to audio production; ability to communicate effectively in writing and methods other than in writing; ability to work collaboratively and effectively with diverse populations; demonstrated independence and self-motivation.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Skills for researching, organizing and prioritizing project work. Experience in research or writing relating to underrepresented or communities of color, particularly indigenous communities.

  16. Manuscript Division Reference and Resources (Library Services/ Manuscript Reading Room)

    Short Description: This project involves assisting researchers in accessing the division's collections electronically by responding to reference inquiries; analyzing reference requests; investigating sources of information; and drafting, revising, and delivering responses. The Junior Fellow will gain an introductory knowledge of the principles, concepts, and techniques of archival management and reference.

    Full Description: Overseeing a collection of approximately 70 million primary source items relating to American history and culture, the Manuscript Reading Room is a service-oriented focal point for members of Congress and their staff, the academic community, journalists, genealogists, and the general public conducting research in American history and culture. The Junior Fellow will assist researchers in accessing the division's collections electronically by responding to reference inquiries received via electronic means; analyzing reference requests; investigating sources of information; and drafting, revising, and delivering responses. The Junior Fellow may also work on special finding aids projects that improve researcher access to the materials, such as LibGuides, and assist in developing new deliverables such as handouts and tutorials, for researchers to better understand how to access our collections virtually. Through an exposure to various aspects of archival reference and description, the Junior Fellow will gain an introductory knowledge of the principles, concepts, and techniques of archival management and reference.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Demonstrated knowledge of American history and culture; ability to prioritize work and meet deadlines; ability to communicate effectively in writing; ability to think critically and propose resolutions to problems; and ability to work effectively and collaboratively in a team setting.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Experience working in a research library environment; knowledge of integrated library systems, basic library applications, and other information technologies.

  17. Genealogy Outreach and Engagement (Library Services/Main Reading Room)

    Short Description: The Library contains resources for diverse users to research their genealogy. This project connects a wide range of users with the tools and resources needed to explore genealogy at the Library, where collections hold stories of everyday lives and places.

    Full Description: The Library contains resources for diverse users to research their genealogy, but this fact is not widely known. Growing interest in genealogy in recent years accelerated during the pandemic. Researching their own family history helps connect users to the Library, where collections hold stories of everyday lives and places. The Library’s images, maps, and newspapers allow users to better understand their ancestors’ world. The Junior Fellow will work with staff to: learn about the resources, including reference staff, and how to use them; create strategies to promote engagement with the resources by users diverse in age, geographical origin, and more, to include writing a blog post for the Main Reading Room blog; designing 3-4 bookmarks; writing one post each for 1-3 different social media platforms; creating one slide or video presentation, and other product(s).

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Historical or genealogical research skills. Ability to: communicate effectively both verbally and in writing; analyze materials; plan, organize, and execute work within specified deadlines; use computerized search tools and databases, work independently with limited supervision; intermediate to advanced skills in Microsoft Office Suite; familiarity with Adobe Photoshop; proficiency in at least one social media platform (Facebook, Twitter, etc.); and interest in multimedia communications for outreach to diverse audiences

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Skills for researching, organizing and prioritizing project work. Experience in research or writing targeted for diverse communities.

  18. Mapping the Historical Demographics: Race and Inequality (Geography and Map Division)

    Short Description: This project will uncover and delve deeply into old Census maps, maps produced by researchers and by other cartographers in the US, from 1800 to the present, which show the historical demographics of race and economic inequality in the US. The Junior Fellow will collect and present documents in a web mapping application available as a group for the public.

    Full Description: The Geography and Map Division of the Library of Congress contains the largest map collection in the world. In its drawers are rare and important-- but mostly unknown to scholars and researchers-- maps that trace the historical demographics of race and inequality in the United States. Inspired by the work currently being done by the Division in support of the House Select Committee on Inequality, this project will uncover and delve deeply into old Census maps, maps produced by researchers and by other cartographers in the US, from 1800 to the present, which show the historical demographics of race and economic inequality in the US. The Junior Fellow will work closely with the curator to collect and present these important documents in a web mapping application that will make them available as a group for the first time to researchers, Congressional staff and the general public.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Basic computer literacy and a desire to learn how to create digital humanities applications; interest in history; a curiosity for how primary source historical materials are used in the legislative process; and archival work in a research map library.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Skills for researching, organizing and prioritizing project work. Experience in research relating to underrepresented or communities of color.

  19. Carvalho Monteiro Collection (Library Services/Preservation/Collections Management Division)

    Short Description: The Carvalho Monteiro Library, created by Brazilian-born Portuguese businessman Antonio Augusto Carvalho Monteiro, is the backbone of the Hispanic Collection. The Junior Fellow will find, review and identify items in the collection and create a detailed list of those items, as well as updating the ILS records to give access to researchers worldwide.

    Full Description: The Carvalho Monteiro (CM) Library is an approximately 30,000-volume private library created by Brazilian-born Portuguese businessman, Antonio Augusto Carvalho Monteiro (1850-1920). Purchased by the Library in 1927 and 1929, it was considered the largest acquisitions by the Library at that time and the backbone of the Hispanic Collection. This project consists of finding, reviewing and identifying items from the CM library to create a detailed list of items purchased by the Library as well as updating the ILS records for those items with provenance to give access to researchers worldwide.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Proficiency in Microsoft Programs, specifically Excel and PowerPoint and Adobe Photoshop; general experience in collections; attention to detail; and interest in history.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Interest in or knowledge of Latin languages, such as Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, and French is not required, but preferable.

  20. Preservation: External Climate and Internal Building Climates (Library Services/Preservation, Research and Testing Division)

    Short Description: The Junior Fellow will undertake an analysis of historical DC-area weather data to review how weather patterns affect the interior microclimates of old buildings. The Junior Fellow will report predictive data that would assist smaller under-resourced cultural heritage institutions with older buildings, un-controlled storage or climate-susceptible locations.

    Full Description: The Library’s Preservation, Research and Testing Division (PRTD) and the Preservation Directorate (PD) maintain years of environmental monitoring data related to the preservation needs of collections, lab spaces, storage, exhibit and visual displays. The Junior Fellow will undertake a quantitative analysis of historical DC-area weather data combined with PRTD and PD data to review how weather patterns affect the interior microclimates of older buildings. The Junior Fellow will aggregate weather data from local sources and analyze how Capitol Hill LC monitored spaces have responded in turn, paying particular attention to temperature, humidity, and barometric pressure. This project highlights the importance of climate change for cultural heritage institutions. The project is both collections and operations-oriented, with a focus on preservation/access to collections in reading rooms, storage and exhibits. This predictive data would assist smaller under-resourced cultural heritage institutions with older buildings, un-controlled storage, or climate-susceptible locations.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: At least 3 semesters of laboratory experience (in any scientific field); at least 1 course in introduction level statistics; familiarity with Excel, SigmaPlot, or comparable data management and manipulation software, and comfort with transferring and interpreting files and data; demonstrated ability to manage time, work independently, and track work progress on a multiperson project.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Previous experience working in a cultural heritage institution.

  21. Winning Hearts and Minds: Malay and Indonesian Titles (Library Services/ Asian Division)

    Short Description: The Junior Fellow will assist in making the Franklin Book Program collection more accessible to the public by processing and inventorying Malay and Indonesian titles, and researching pre-existing records to assist the Overseas Operation Jakarta office in creating records in the future.

    Full Description: The Asian Division (AD) holds Cold War publications in Bengali, Chinese, Indonesian, Malay, and Urdu from the Franklin Book Program (FBP)—a publishing program that provided assistance to developing countries between 1952 and 1978. This project seeks to have the 64 Malay and 128 Indonesian titles from the program inventoried as part of a larger effort to make LC’s FBP collection more discoverable. The Junior Fellow will receive scans of FBP Malay and Indonesian titles, inventory them, and identify the corresponding titles of the original English publications. The Junior Fellow will also search for pre-existing records to assist the Overseas Operation Jakarta office in creating records in the future, and research the history of the FBP in Malaysia and Indonesia to prepare a post for LC’s 4 Corners of the World blog. In addition, the Junior Fellow will work on a LibGuide (online finding guide) started by previous fellows and a South Asia librarian. Time permitting, the Junior Fellow will help inventory a box of Indonesian items with the goal of making this material more discoverable.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Advanced level Malay/Indonesian is a requirement for this project. The fellow will apply linguistic expertise to identify and capture metadata that will be used by Malay/Indonesian catalogers in the Overseas Field Office in Jakarta.

    Intermediate level proficiency in Microsoft Office Suite, especially Word and Excel; knowledge of and interest in the Southeast Asian region, particularly Malaysia and Indonesia.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Experience in Malay/Indonesian translation and transliteration; experience working in a public, research, or university library (e.g., reference, collection services, and circulation); knowledge of American literature.

  22. Uncovering Poetry in African Languages (Library Services/African Section of the African & Middle Eastern Reading Room)

    Short Description: The Junior Fellow will assist the African Section of the African & Middle Eastern Reading Room with surveying the large collections of poetry published in indigenous African languages. The Junior Fellow will utilize electronic resources to inventory the various sources in which African language poetry is found in Library collections.

    Full Description: Utilizing a variety of acquisitions methods over more than five decades, the Library has acquired manifestations of African poetry in a number of formats and in hundreds of indigenous languages. This creative work is found in all likely and unlikely corners of the Library, and much of it cannot be located using conventional search techniques. African language poetry is often simply cataloged as “language—texts”, with no indication in the notes field of the poetic contents. Moreover, much poetry that came to life in African literary or cultural journals is entirely unindexed. This project focuses on surveying large collections of poetry published in indigenous African languages. Utilizing electronic resources like the LOC Catalog and subscription databases in the humanities, the Junior Fellow will inventory the various sources in which African language poetry is found in LOC collections, across formats and languages.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Knowledge of searching bibliographic databases and exporting search results.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of a major indigenous African language such as Yoruba, Hausa, Kiswahili, Amharic, isiZulu, Akan/Twi, Bambara, Lingala, Sesotho, Setswana, Chichewa, Wolof, etc.; knowledge of the digital humanities.

  23. Diving into Our Digital Ephemera: Enhancing Web Archives Access (Library Services/Digital Collection Management & Services Division)

    Short Description: The Junior Fellow will conduct research to enhance description of the web archives to help increase the accessibility and discoverability of the Library’s collections. The project is collections-oriented as the Junior Fellow will select from thematic and event web archives based on their area of interest, and work to increase engagement with web archives.

    Full Description: For more than 20 years, the Web Archiving Program has been preserving web content selected by subject specialists from around the Library. More than 27,000 web archives are publicly available on loc.gov with descriptions of the items and the collections to which they belong. The Junior Fellow will help to increase the accessibility and discoverability of the Library’s collections by conducting research to enhance description of the web archives. Highlighting the ephemeral nature of the web, the project may include identifying sites preserved in the Library of Congress Web Archives that are no longer available on the live web. The Fellow’s work will help to increase engagement with the web archives by enabling discovery of content that supports the study of web history and how information is shared online.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Ability to plan, organize, and execute work within specified deadlines; communicate effectively orally and in writing; conduct research using online tools and databases; analyze and organize information; use Microsoft Excel and Word.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Familiarity with web archives and web technologies.

  24. Online Exhibit Curation: American Archive of Public Broadcasting (Library Services/National Audio Visual Conservation Center)

    Short Description: Each Junior Fellow will curate a new exhibit for the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) website on a topic of current and enduring concern, such as public broadcasting’s coverage of communities of color, poverty in American communities, women’s movement, health care, rural America, policing, or science-related topics.

    Full Description: The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and WGBH Boston to digitally preserve at-risk public media programs from the past 70 years and make them accessible to the public. The AAPB website includes curated exhibits that explore how public broadcasting has covered subjects such as civil rights, elections, and climate change. Each Junior Fellow will curate a new exhibit on a topic of current and enduring concern to be determined in consultation with the Project Mentor. Possible subjects include public broadcasting’s coverage of poverty in American communities, health care, rural America, policing, and science-related topics. Curatorial responsibilities include selecting programs and excerpts; drafting an essay based on research to provide contextual information; selecting still images; and time permitting, creating an interactive timeline, map, and highlights reel.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Ability to communicate effectively in writing; ability to conduct research using authoritative sources; knowledge of U.S. history and international affairs since 1950.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of broadcasting and journalism practices; HTML skills; experience with digital humanities tools. Experience in research or writing relating to underrepresented communities.

  25. Metadata Enhancement and Remediation (Law Library)

    Short Description: This project will revise and enhance metadata for the Law Library of Congress’ blog, In Custodia Legis, with the goal of enhancing accessibility and discoverability.

    Full Description: The Law Library of Congress’ blog, In Custodia Legis, has been active for over a decade and contains many informative posts that focus on domestic, foreign, international, and comparative law; the blog is now a vital part of the Law Library digital collections. In order to enhance the accessibility and discoverability of the blog, the Junior Fellow will revise and enhance the blog’s metadata utilizing a controlled vocabulary. In addition, the Junior Fellow will work to update the In Custodia Legis manual for guest bloggers.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Basic familiarity with the use of a WSIWYG HTML editor, such as Wordpress; experience with applying a controlled vocabulary to describe digital collection items; familiarity with law and legal materials; and ability to communicate how to perform tasks in a writing style that is intended for a novice.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Skills for researching, organizing and prioritizing project work

  26. Collections Access: Leading Blind and Visually Impaired Musicians (National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled)

    Short Description: This project puts a spotlight on blind composers and musicians who are leading the music scene today and in history, and provides information about music materials of/by/about and for blind musicians available in the NLS collection.

    Full Description: This project puts a spotlight on blind composers and musicians who are leading the music scene today and in history, and provides information about music materials of/by/about and for blind musicians available in the NLS collection. The Junior Fellow will create a guide that includes references to available braille music scores; large print scores; digital talking books about blind and visually impaired composers and musicians; digital talking books teaching songs and compositions by blind and visually impaired musicians; biographical information; links to further resources such as blogs related to the subject, and music teaching materials for blind and visually impaired persons. Additionally, the project will shine a light onto the under-represented community of blind and visually impaired musicians in history and today; promote the broad range of NLS patron services available to all Americans with visual impairments; and provide a collaborative and professional development opportunity to the Junior Fellow.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Required: Proficiency in conducting research using online catalogs and trusted music information resources; experience in writing information documents (e.g. paper, or presentation, guidelines, blogs); and familiarity with services and resources available to the blind and visually impaired community.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of music, of music genres, music instruction and music history; knowledge and experience with trusted reference sources for music information; familiarity with services available to the blind and visually impaired community; ability to work in teams; experience in writing guides, papers or similar informative documents for a specific audience; open to learning and acquiring new skills and abilities.

  27. Copyright for Kids (US Copyright Office)

    Short Description: The Junior Fellow will support the U.S. Copyright Office’s strategic plan goal “Copyright for All” to reach out to diverse and varied audiences, groups, and ages.

    Full Description: The U.S. Copyright Office administers major parts of copyright law in the United States. Copyright protection applies to nearly every creator of music, photograph, work of literature, and many other forms of creativity. The Junior Fellow would be tasked with 1) identifying primary and secondary school audiences for outreach materials, 2) developing a strategy for creation of educational content, 3) writing preliminary outlines of educational outreach and accompanying materials for teachers, and 4) developing an outreach and communications plan. The project supports the U.S. Copyright Office’s strategic plan goal “Copyright for All” to reach out to diverse and varied audiences, groups, and ages.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program. Skills/Knowledge Required: Communications and outreach experience, writing skills, knowledge of primary and secondary education settings.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Ability to effectively reach target audiences. Knowledge of educational outreach strategies. Ability to effectively manage projects. Knowledge of the principles for written and oral communication.

Junior Fellows Program 2022 Specific Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is GS 3-1 pay?

    This position is paid at GS 3-1 level. You will be paid at the rate for the locality in which you will conduct your work.

  2. What is my actual schedule?

    Fellows work a fulltime 8 hours/day, 40-hour/week schedule (two weeks equal a single pay period). For this reason, when determining the schedule to be worked, you will log off 8.5 hours after starting. With Project Mentor prior discussion and approval, Fellows may adjust their schedule within the Pay Period. Library’s core hours require most staff (including Fellows) to begin between 6:30am and 9:30am and end the day between 3:00pm and 6:00 pm (Eastern Time).

  3. Do I need to provide a transcript?

    Yes. Your transcript and/or registrar document will be required to verify your eligibility for consideration and hire. You must submit the latest transcript from your current or most recently attended college or university OR official registrar documentation certifying enrollment in Fall 2021 and/or imminent graduation between December 2021 and June 2022. Unofficial copies of transcripts are acceptable at time of application.

    NOTE: All transcripts and/or registrar documents must be in PDF file format. Image files, Word documents, etc. are not acceptable.

    Failure to provide any proof of enrollment will result in disqualification from consideration.

  4. How competitive is the Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program?

    Based on our experience with other fellowship programs offered here at the Library of Congress, we expect this to be a highly competitive program with a large number of applications from very qualified and motivated students. Therefore, we must strictly adhere to the requirements for application packages and the deadline for their submission. Interested applicants are encouraged to carefully and thoroughly read the vacancy announcement for the best understanding of the eligibility criteria, application requirements and procedures, and other important information.

  5. What are the selecting officials looking for in the application?

    Selecting officials may consider course selection, work experience, language skills, and interests related to the various subject areas noted on the announcement.

  6. I am interested in more than one subject area of this program. Can I apply to more than one? Must I submit separate applications for each?

    In your cover letter, state explicitly your areas of interest. Your education, experience, and general background should affirm your selections and demonstrate your wish for serious consideration for each subject area you identified. Submit only one application package. If you are only interested in only one specific project choice, repeat it as your 1st, 2nd and 3rd preference.

  7. Do you provide housing or transportation?

    No. This is a virtual program and you will work from home.

  8. How many academic credits do I receive in the program?

    The Library of Congress is not an academic institution and does not grant course credits. However, you may check with your school about receiving credits for your internship if interested.

  9. I am not available to start the internship on Monday, May 23, 2022 Am I still eligible?

    No. The schedule and the length of the internship direct that we require all Junior Fellows to report on the same day, Monday, May 23, 2022. This also allows the cohort to be provided critical information required in orientation to all participants.

  10. Can my internship lead to a full-time job?

    The internships come with no guarantee for permanent employment. However, we encourage those interested in careers at the Library of Congress to look at all job opportunities listed on the USAJOBS website and the Library’s Careers website. The new skills and experience gained during your time at the Library can be used as a stepping stone and the supervisor of your internship can be a valuable reference for your future job searches.

  11. Will these internships be offered in the Fall/Winter?

    No. This is a summer internship program only.

    For additional information about internships and fellowships at the Library of Congress, visit the Internship and Fellowship Program portal: https://www.loc.gov/ifp. Click on the Overview tab to explore other internships at the Library of Congress.

  12. What should I include in my federal resume?
    • Dates, hours, level of experience and examples for each work experience.
    • Volunteer work and roles in community organizations.
    • Numbers, percentages, and/or dollars that highlight your accomplishments.

    Find more details and guidance here:

    USAJOBS Help Center | What should I include in my federal resume?

  13. Is a background check required?

    If you are selected, a background check will be required. You will be contacted by the Library’s Personnel Security Division with directions detailing how to proceed. Follow the directions carefully and complete the required tasks as soon as possible. Late submissions will impact the onboarding process.