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Web Archive U.S. Marine Corps (USMC)

View Captures - Source Url: https://www.marines.mil/
Some content may be under embargo. See the Rights and Access statement for more information.

More Resources

View Captures - Source Url: https://www.marines.mil/News/
Some content may be under embargo. See the Rights and Access statement for more information.

About this Item

Title

  • U.S. Marine Corps (USMC)

Summary

  • "The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for providing power projection, using the mobility of the United States Navy to, by Congressional mandate, rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces on land, at sea, and in the air. The U.S. Marine Corps is one of the four armed service branches in the U.S. Department of Defense and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States. The current Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the highest-ranking military officer in the U.S. armed forces, is a Marine Corps general. The Marine Corps has been a component of the U.S. Department of the Navy since 30 June 1834, working closely with naval forces for training, transportation, and logistics. The USMC operates posts on land and aboard sea-going amphibious warfare ships around the world. Additionally, several of the Marines' tactical aviation squadrons, primarily Marine Fighter Attack squadrons, are also embedded in Navy carrier air wings and operate from the Navy's nuclear-powered aircraft carriers. Two battalions of Continental Marines were formed on 10 November 1775 in Philadelphia as a service branch of infantry troops capable of fighting for independence both at sea and on shore. The role of the Corps has since grown and evolved, expanding to aerial warfare and earning popular titles such as, 'America's third air force', and, 'second land army'. The United States Marine Corps has distinguished itself as it has served in the majority of American wars and armed conflicts, from its inception to the modern era, and attained prominence in the 20th century when its theories and practices of amphibious warfare proved prescient and ultimately formed the cornerstone of the Pacific theater of World War II. By the mid-20th century, the U.S. Marine Corps had become a major theorist of and the world's dominant practitioner of amphibious warfare. Its ability to rapidly respond on short notice to expeditionary crises gives it a strong role in the implementation and execution of American foreign policy. As of 2016, the USMC has around 182,000 active duty members and some 38,500 reserve Marines. It is the smallest of the U.S. Armed Forces within the U.S. DoD." -- Summary retrieved on October 7, 2019 http://dbpedia.org/resource/United_States_Marine_Corps

Names

  • United States -- Marine Corps

Created / Published

  • United States.

Headings

  • -  United States. Marine Corps
  • -  United States. Armed Forces
  • -  United States. Military policy

Genre

  • website

Form

  • electronic

Repository

  • Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., 20540 USA

Source Url

  • https://www.marines.mil/
  • https://www.marines.mil/News/

Access Condition

  • None

Scopes

  • -  www.marines.mil/News/ (domain)
  • -  www.usmc.mil (domain)

Online Format

  • web page

Additional Metadata Formats

Rights & Access

The Library of Congress is making its Web Archives Collection available for educational and research purposes. The Library has obtained permission for the use of many materials in the Collection, and presents additional materials for educational and research purposes in accordance with fair use under United States copyright law.

Many, if not all, of the websites in the collection and elements incorporated into the websites (e.g., photographs, articles, graphical representations) are protected by copyright. You are responsible for deciding whether your use of the items in this collection is legal. You are also responsible for securing any permissions needed to use the items. You will need written permission from the copyright owners of materials not in the public domain for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemptions. Some content may be protected under international law. You may also need permission from holders of other rights, such as publicity and/or privacy rights.

Researchers should consult the sites themselves for information about rights, contacts, and permissions. The catalog record for each archived website contains the specific information about the site known to the Library. Some sites in this collection may be restricted to onsite access only; see the Access Condition statement in each item record for more information.

The Library of Congress would like to hear from any copyright owners who are not properly identified on this website so that we may make the necessary corrections. In addition, if you are a copyright owner or otherwise have exclusive control over materials presently available through this collection and do not wish your materials to be available through this website, please let us know. To make a takedown request, please contact us via this contact form.

Content Embargo

Not all content that the Library has archives for is currently available through the Library’s website. Limitations affecting access to the archived content include a one-year embargo period for all content in the archive. Content outside of the embargo period is updated and made available regularly. For more information visit the Web Archiving Program | For Researchers page.

Citing Resources in the Web Archive

Citations should indicate: Archived in the Library of Congress Web Archives at www.loc.gov. When citing a particular website include the archived website's Citation ID (e.g., /item/lcwa00010240). Researchers are advised to follow standard citation guidelines for websites, pages, and articles. Researchers are reminded that many of the materials in this web archive are copyrighted and that citations must credit the authors/creators and publishers of the works. For guidance about compiling full citations consult Citing Primary Sources.

More about Copyright and Other Restrictions

Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

United States. U.S. Marine Corps USMC. United States, 2006. Web Archive. https://www.loc.gov/item/lcwaN0003398/.

APA citation style:

United States. (2006) U.S. Marine Corps USMC. United States. [Web Archive] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/lcwaN0003398/.

MLA citation style:

United States. U.S. Marine Corps USMC. United States, 2006. Web Archive. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/lcwaN0003398/>.