Web Archive Black Lives Matter (BLM)

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About this Item

Title

  • Black Lives Matter (BLM)

Summary

  • "Black Lives Matter (BLM) is an international activist movement, originating in the African-American community, that campaigns against violence and systemic racism toward black people. BLM regularly protests police killings of black people and broader issues of racial profiling, police brutality, and racial inequality in the United States criminal justice system. In 2013, the movement began with the use of the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter on social media, after the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of African-American teen Trayvon Martin. Black Lives Matter became nationally recognized for its street demonstrations following the 2014 deaths of two African Americans: Michael Brown, resulting in protests and unrest in Ferguson, and Eric Garner in New York City. The originators of the hashtag and call to action, Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi, expanded their project into a national network of over 30 local chapters between 2014 and 2016. The overall Black Lives Matter movement, however, is a decentralized network and has no formal hierarchy. Since the Ferguson protests, participants in the movement have demonstrated against the deaths of numerous other African Americans by police actions or while in police custody, including those ofJonathan Ferrell,John Crawford,Ezell Ford,Laquan McDonald,Akai Gurley,Tamir Rice,Eric Harris,Walter Scott,Freddie Gray,Sandra Bland,Samuel DuBose,Jeremy McDole,Alton Sterling, andPhilando Castile. In the summer of 2015, Black Lives Matter activists became involved in the 2016 United States presidential election. There have been many reactions to the Black Lives Matter movement. The U.S. population's perception of Black Lives Matter varies considerably by race. The phrase 'All Lives Matter' sprang up as a response to the Black Lives Matter movement. However, 'All Lives Matter' has been criticized for dismissing or misunderstanding the message of 'Black Lives Matter'. Following the shooting of two police officers in Ferguson, the hashtag Blue Lives Matter was created by supporters of the police. BLM has been encouraged to confront intraracial violence in the African American community." -- Summary retrieved on October 7, 2019 http://dbpedia.org/resource/Black_Lives_Matter

Created / Published

  • United States.

Headings

  • -  Human Rights
  • -  Black Lives Matter Movement
  • -  Black lives matter movement
  • -  Racial Justice
  • -  African American History and Culture
  • -  Economic Justice
  • -  History

Genre

  • website

Form

  • electronic

Repository

  • Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., 20540 USA

Source Url

  • https://blacklivesmatter.com/

Access Condition

  • None

Scopes

  • -  blacklivesmatter.com (domain)
  • -  secure.actblue.com/donate/ms_blm_homepage_2019 (domain)

Online Format

  • web page

Additional Metadata Formats

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Citing Resources in the Web Archive

Citations should indicate: Archived in the Library of Congress Web Archives at www.loc.gov. When citing a particular website include the archived website's Citation ID (e.g., /item/lcwa00010240). Researchers are advised to follow standard citation guidelines for websites, pages, and articles. Researchers are reminded that many of the materials in this web archive are copyrighted and that citations must credit the authors/creators and publishers of the works. For guidance about compiling full citations consult Citing Primary Sources.

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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Black Lives Matter BLM. United States, 2015. Web Archive. https://www.loc.gov/item/lcwaN0016241/.

APA citation style:

(2015) Black Lives Matter BLM. United States. [Web Archive] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/lcwaN0016241/.

MLA citation style:

Black Lives Matter BLM. United States, 2015. Web Archive. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/lcwaN0016241/>.