Web Archive United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia

View Captures
Some content may be under embargo. See the Rights and Access statement for more information.

More Resources

View Captures
Some content may be under embargo. See the Rights and Access statement for more information.

About this Item

Title
United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia
Summary
"The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (in case citations, D.C. Cir.) known informally as the D.C. Circuit, is the federal appellate court for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. Appeals from the D.C. Circuit, as with all the U.S. Courts of Appeals, are heard on a discretionary basis by the Supreme Court. It should not be confused with the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which is limited in jurisdiction by subject matter rather than geography, or with the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, which is roughly equivalent to a state supreme court in the District of Columbia, established in 1970 to relieve the D.C. Circuit from having to take appeals from the local D.C. trial court. While it has the smallest geographic jurisdiction of any of the United States courts of appeals, the D.C. Circuit, with eleven active judgeships, is arguably the most important inferior appellate court. The court is given the responsibility of directly reviewing the decisions and rulemaking of many federal independent agencies of the United States government based in the national capital, often without prior hearing by a district court. Aside from the agencies whose statutes explicitly direct review by the D.C. Circuit, the court typically hears cases from other agencies under the more general jurisdiction granted to the Courts of Appeals under the Administrative Procedure Act. Given the broad areas over which federal agencies have power, this often gives the judges of the D.C. Circuit a central role in affecting national U.S. policy and law. Because of this, the D.C. Circuit is often referred to as the second most powerful court in the United States, second only to the Supreme Court A judgeship on the D.C. Circuit is often thought of as a stepping-stone for appointment to the Supreme Court. As of February 2016, three of the eight justices on the Supreme Court are alumni of the D.C. Circuit: Chief Justice John Roberts and Associate Justices Clarence Thomas and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Justice Elena Kagan was nominated by Bill Clinton to the same seat that Roberts would later fill, but was never given a vote in the Senate. In addition, Chief Justices Fred M. Vinson and Warren Burger, as well as Associate Justices Wiley Blount Rutledge and Antonin Scalia, served on the D.C. Circuit before their elevations to the Supreme Court. In 1987, the Reagan Administration put forth two failed nominees from the D.C. Circuit: former Judge Robert Bork, who was rejected by the Senate, and former (2001–2008) Chief Judge Douglas H. Ginsburg (no relation to Ruth Bader Ginsburg), who withdrew his nomination after it became known that he had used marijuana as a college student and professor in the 1960s and 1970s. Unlike the Courts of Appeals for the other geographical districts where home-state senators have the privilege of holding up confirmation by the 'blue slip' process, because the D.C. Circuit does not represent any state, confirmation of nominees is often procedurally and practically easier. However, in recent years, several nominees were stalled and some were ultimately not confirmed because senators claimed that the court had become larger than necessary to handle its caseload. The court has a history of reversing the Federal Communications Commission's major policy actions. The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit meets at the E. Barrett Prettyman Federal Courthouse, near Judiciary Square in downtown Washington, D.C. From 1984 to 2009, there were twelve seats on the D.C. Circuit. One of those seats was eliminated by the Court Security Improvement Act of 2007 on January 7, 2008, with immediate effect, leaving the number of authorized judgeships at eleven. (The eliminated judgeship was instead assigned to the Ninth Circuit, with the assignment taking effect on January 21, 2009). Decisions of the U.S. Courts of Appeals are published in the Federal Reporter, an unofficial reporter from Thomson Reuters." -- Summary retrieved on October 7, 2019 http://dbpedia.org/resource/United_States_Court_of_Appeals_for_the_District_of_Columbia_Circuit
Created / Published
United States.
Subject Headings
-  Law
Genre
website
Form
electronic
Repository
Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., 20540 USA
Source Url
http://www.cadc.uscourts.gov/
https://www.cadc.uscourts.gov/internet/home.nsf
Access Condition
None
Scopes
-  cadc.uscourts.gov (domain)
-  www.cadc.uscourts.gov/ (domain)
Online Format
web page
Additional Metadata Formats
MODSXML Base Record
MODSXML Supplemental Record

Rights & Access

The Library of Congress is making its Web Archives Collection available for educational and research purposes. The Library has obtained permission for the use of many materials in the Collection, and presents additional materials for educational and research purposes in accordance with fair use under United States copyright law.

Many, if not all, of the websites in the collection and elements incorporated into the websites (e.g., photographs, articles, graphical representations) are protected by copyright. You are responsible for deciding whether your use of the items in this collection is legal. You are also responsible for securing any permissions needed to use the items. You will need written permission from the copyright owners of materials not in the public domain for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemptions. Some content may be protected under international law. You may also need permission from holders of other rights, such as publicity and/or privacy rights.

Researchers should consult the sites themselves for information about rights, contacts, and permissions. The catalog record for each archived website contains the specific information about the site known to the Library. Some sites in this collection may be restricted to onsite access only; see the Access Condition statement in each item record for more information.

The Library of Congress would like to hear from any copyright owners who are not properly identified on this website so that we may make the necessary corrections. In addition, if you are a copyright owner or otherwise have exclusive control over materials presently available through this collection and do not wish your materials to be available through this website, please let us know. To make a takedown request, please contact us via this contact form.

Content Embargo

Not all content that the Library has archives for is currently available through the Library’s website. Limitations affecting access to the archived content include a one-year embargo period for all content in the archive. Content outside of the embargo period is updated and made available regularly. For more information visit the Web Archiving Program | For Researchers page.

Citing Resources in the Web Archive

Citations should indicate: Archived in the Library of Congress Web Archives at www.loc.gov. When citing a particular website include the archived website's Citation ID (e.g., /item/lcwa00010240). Researchers are advised to follow standard citation guidelines for websites, pages, and articles. Researchers are reminded that many of the materials in this web archive are copyrighted and that citations must credit the authors/creators and publishers of the works. For guidance about compiling full citations consult Citing Primary Sources.

More about Copyright and Other Restrictions

Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. United States, 1997. Web Archive. https://www.loc.gov/item/lcwaN0017675/.

APA citation style:

(1997) United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. United States. [Web Archive] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/lcwaN0017675/.

MLA citation style:

United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. United States, 1997. Web Archive. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/lcwaN0017675/>.

More Web Archives like this