Manuscript/Mixed Material Amelia Earhart's palm print and analysis of her character prepared by Nellie Simmons Meier, 28 June 1933.

About this Item

Title
Amelia Earhart's palm print and analysis of her character prepared by Nellie Simmons Meier, 28 June 1933.
Created / Published
28 June 1933
Subject Headings
-  Aeronautics
-  Earhart, Amelia (1897-1937)
-  Meier, Nellie Simmons (d. 1939)
-  Palmistry
-  Manuscripts
Genre
Manuscripts
Notes
-  Reproduction number: A94 (color slide; palm print and page 1 of analysis)
-  On 2 July 1937 during her famed journey across the Pacific Ocean to complete her goal of flying around the world, noted aviator Amelia Earhart (1897-1937) disappeared without a trace. Speculation still exists as to the cause and validity of her elusive disappearance, and Earhart's whereabouts remain a compelling mystery. As one of the first female aviators to attempt an around-the-world flight, Earhart solidified her reputation as one of the most renowned, outspoken, and daring women of her day. Having achieved a series of record-breaking flights--such as surpassing the women's altitude record of 14,000 feet in 1922 and venturing solo across the Atlantic Ocean in 1932--this trailblazer not only paved the way for women aviators but advocated independence, self-reliance, and equal rights for all women.
-  Billed as the "First Lady of the Air" or "Lady Lindy" (Charles A. Lindbergh's female counterpart), Earhart challenged gender barriers and influenced women's position in the nascent aviation industry. She was a founding member and president of the Ninety-Nines, an international organization of women pilots, and she received innumerable awards for her accomplishments. In 1932 after completing her solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean, President Herbert Hoover (1874-1964) presented Earhart with the National Geographic Society's gold medal, an honor never before bestowed to a woman. She was also the first woman to receive the National Aeronautical Association's honorary membership. Continuing to act as a role model for women, Earhart joined Purdue University as a career advisor to women and also began her own charter airline. Her success as an aviator and businesswoman was an inspiration to countless women.
-  While the mystery surrounding Earhart's disappearance has yet to unfold, one piece of evidence remains to give insight into Earhart's adventurous nature. This 1933 palm print of Earhart taken by palmist Nellie Simmons Meier (d. 1939) demonstrates the aviator's determined demeanor. As a palmist, Meier analyzed her subjects' character by examining the size, shape, and lines of their hands. In 1937 Meier published a collection of notable palm prints in her book Lions' Paws: The Story of Famous Hands. She subsequently donated the original prints and character sketches to the Library of Congress. According to Meier's analysis, Earhart's palm revealed her passion for flying. The length and breadth of her palm indicated a love of physical activity and a strong will. Her long fingers not only showed her conscientious attention to detail and pursuit of perfection, but also revealed Earhart's ambitious yet rational nature. Her palm further reflected the reasoned and logistical manner of someone who considers all possibilities before making a decision. While the search for Earhart continues even today, her memory as an aviation pioneer and feminist role model lives on.
Source Collection
Nellie Simmons Meier Collection
Repository
Manuscript Division
Language
English
Online Format
image
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Chicago citation style:

Amelia Earhart's palm print and analysis of her character prepared by Nellie Simmons Meier, 28 June. 28 June, 1933. Manuscript/Mixed Material. https://www.loc.gov/item/mcc.038/.

APA citation style:

(1933) Amelia Earhart's palm print and analysis of her character prepared by Nellie Simmons Meier, 28 June. 28 June. [Manuscript/Mixed Material] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/mcc.038/.

MLA citation style:

Amelia Earhart's palm print and analysis of her character prepared by Nellie Simmons Meier, 28 June. 28 June, 1933. Manuscript/Mixed Material. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/mcc.038/>.

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