Photo, Print, Drawing To Sinai via the Red Sea, Tor, and Wady Hebran. Caring for sick camel.

[ digital file from original photo ]

About this Item

Title
To Sinai via the Red Sea, Tor, and Wady Hebran. Caring for sick camel.
Contributor Names
American Colony (Jerusalem). Photo Dept., photographer
Created / Published
[approximately 1900 to 1920]
Subject Headings
-  Egypt--Sinai.
-  Egypt--Sinai
Format Headings
Dry plate negatives.
Notes
-  Title from: Catalogue of photographs & lantern slides ... [1936?].
-  Caption on negative: Caring for a sick camel (crossed out).
-  On negative: 1526 (crossed out).
-  Date from Matson LOT cards.
-  Photograph taken in Wadi Feiran (Feiran Oasis) or Wadi EL Sheikh(?), where there is an abundant palm and Tarfaa groves. (Source: A. Shams, Sinai Peninsula Research, 2018)
-  The traditional Bedouin dwellings and livelihood and tools, e.g. grinding stones, mirrored pre-historic ages post Chalcolithic/Copper Age and the start of Early Bronze Age I (4500-3150 BCE), marking the very end of hunting and gathering around summer desert lakes and the development of tribal chiefdoms and husbandry based economy. Camels replaced feral donkeys in transportation in 2nd millennium BCE, though domesticated donkeys are still used in the High Mountains of Sinai Peninsula. The Bedouin inhabitants of South Sinai belong to "El-Tawara Tribal Alliance" between the following tribes - mostly migrated from the Arabian Peninsula and settled in Sinai Peninsula between 10th and 17th centuries CE: Mezena (17th century CE),'Aliqat (14th century CE), Hamada (pre-Islamic) and Bani Wasel (10th-13th centuries CE), Awlad Sa'aed (14th century CE), Qrarsha (16th century CE) and Sawalha (14th century CE), and Gebaliya (6th century CE), in addition to Mawtra (? century CE) tribe. The Bedouins traditionally followed a seasonal migration cycle until 1980s CE, especially in the High Mountains of Sinai Peninsula, herding on pastures at different areas and/or altitudes (and practiced seasonal agriculture), where young women herd goats and boys herd camels. They lived in dark tents (or straw or palm leaves huts in some areas in winter) made/woven of goat/camel wool (Arabic: Beit Sha'ar) which were pitched in a row facing east on open grounds in summer or in the protection of boulders or man-made U-shape stone walls (Arabic: Huweita) acting as a wind-breaker in winter, i.e. temporary campsites. Motor vehicles started replacing camels in Sinai Peninsula in the 1920s and 1930s CE. The oases and the Byzantine (later Bedouin) mountain orchards formed a more permanent form of settlements since 3rd-4th centuries CE. Bedouins living inland and on coast traded local products, e.g. agriculture such as fruits and dates for dried fish. A Bedouin wife was traditionally responsible (and partially still) for weaving cloth from camel/goat wool for clothing, tent, furniture, etc, bringing water from wells and springs, collecting firewood, grinding seeds, baking, milking camels and goats, making butter and cooking, bringing up children, etc, while a Bedouin husband is responsible for bringing seeds, goats, camels & donkeys and grinding stones, buying clothing and tent furniture, making charcoal, etc. (Source: A. Shams, Sinai Peninsula Research, 2018)
-  Gift; Episcopal Home; 1978.
Medium
1 negative : glass, dry plate ; 5 x 7 in.
Call Number/Physical Location
LC-M32- 1706 [P&P]
Source Collection
G. Eric and Edith Matson Photograph Collection
Repository
Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
Digital Id
matpc 02108 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/matpc.02108
Control Number
mpc2004004514/PP
Reproduction Number
LC-DIG-matpc-02108 (digital file from original photo)
Rights Advisory
No known restrictions on publication.
Online Format
image
Description
1 negative : glass, dry plate ; 5 x 7 in.

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  • Call Number: LC-M32- 1706 [P&P]
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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

American Colony . Photo Dept, photographer. To Sinai via the Red Sea, Tor, and Wady Hebran. Caring for sick camel. Egypt Sinai, 1900. [Approximately to 1920] Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/mpc2004004514/PP/.

APA citation style:

American Colony . Photo Dept, photographer. (1900) To Sinai via the Red Sea, Tor, and Wady Hebran. Caring for sick camel. Egypt Sinai, 1900. [Approximately to 1920] [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/mpc2004004514/PP/.

MLA citation style:

American Colony . Photo Dept, photographer. To Sinai via the Red Sea, Tor, and Wady Hebran. Caring for sick camel. [Approximately to 1920] Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/mpc2004004514/PP/>.