December 19, 2003 Author Jim Carrier To Discuss Guidebook On Civil Rights Historic Landmarks

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Award-winning journalist and author Jim Carrier will discuss his new book, “A Traveler’s Guide to the Civil Rights Movement,” at the Library of Congress, at noon on Monday, Feb. 2 in the Mumford Room, sixth floor, Madison Building, 101 Independence Avenue S.E. in Washington, D.C. The lecture, sponsored by the Library’s Humanities and Social Sciences Division, is free and open to the public and will be followed by a book signing.

Arranged by state and primarily covering the South, “A Traveler’s Guide to the Civil Rights Movement” features famous historic landmarks such as the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., and the F.W. Woolworth Company store in Greensboro, N.C., as well as lesser-known places, including slave auction sites, schools and homes. The book includes suggested city and state tours and provides the location and a commentary on the history and importance of each site. U.S. Representative John Lewis, in the book’s foreword, writes: “Page by page, ‘A Traveler’s Guide to the Civil Rights Movement’ takes readers on a journey to the memorials, museums, battlegrounds, and sacred places that tell the amazing story of America’s continuous struggle for freedom and justice, a struggle that reached its zenith during the non-violent revolution for civil rights.”

As a journalist for more than 30 years, Jim Carrier was a radio broadcaster, Associated Press correspondent, newspaper editor, and writer for the Denver Post, National Geographic, and The New York Times. He is the author of eight books. Carrier’s publications include “Ten Ways to Fight Hate: A Community Response Guide” (Montgomery, Ala.: Southern Poverty Law Center, 1999), “Down the Colorado: Travels on a Western Waterway” (Boulder, Colo.: R. Rinehart, 1989) and “The Ship and the Storm” (Camden, Maine: International Marine, 2001).

The Humanities and Social Sciences Division provides reference service and collection development in the Main, Local History and Genealogy, and Microform reading rooms, and sponsors lectures in the arts, humanities and the social sciences.

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PR 03-214
2003-12-19
ISSN 0731-3527