October 14, 2016 November Film Talks to Focus on Jewish Themes

Press Contact: Audrey Fischer (202) 707-0022
Public Contact: Gail Shirazi (202) 707-9897

The Library of Congress will host three film talks on Jewish themes during the month of November. Each will feature remarks by the directors and clips from their documentary films.

The series is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required. The presentations will be held at noon in venues located in the Library’s James Madison Building at 101 Independence Ave. S.E., Washington, D.C.

Wednesday, Nov. 9
“Forgotten Transports”

Czech filmmakerLukas Pribyl will discuss his four documentary films based on 400 hours of interviews recorded in 25 countries on five continents. Each film describes one destination of Nazi transports and one unique mode of survival in extreme conditions. Sponsored by the Library’s Hebrew Language Table and the Embassy of the Czech Republic. Location: Law Library Multimedia Center, Room 242, Madison Building.

Thursday, Nov. 10
The Jüdische Kulturbund Project

The project tells the story of Jewish musicians and performing artists who organized in 1933 Nazi Germany and performed until the “Final Solution” in 1941. Project director/creator Gail Prensky, will present with live music performances by Sarah Baumgarten and Patrick O'Donnell. Sponsored by the Motion Picture, Broadcasting & Recorded Sound Division, the European Division and the Hebrew Language Table of the Library of Congress in cooperation with the Goethe-Institut and the Rabin Chair Forum of George Washington University. Location: Mary Pickford Theater, Third Floor, James Madison Building.

Thursday, Nov. 17
“Girl: My Childhood and the Second World War”

International best- selling author and illustrator Alona Frankel will discuss her newly translated memoirs about growing up as a hidden child during the Holocaust. Sponsored by the Library’s Young Readers Center and the Hebrew Language Table in cooperation with the Embassy of Israel. Location: Mary Pickford Theater, Third Floor, James Madison Building.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

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PR 16-183
2016-10-14
ISSN 0731-3527