May 15, 2017 (REVISED May 17, 2017) Marx Brothers, Rare Silent Films and Sounds of the '60s Featured at Packard Campus Theater in June

Press Contact: Bryonna Head (202) 707-3073
Public Contact: Rob Stone (202) 707-0851
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Screenings surrounding the American utopianism known as 1967’s “Summer of Love” will open the month at the Packard  Campus Theater, featuring two evenings of top American and British rock acts of the 1960s from the prime time television series “Shindig!” and the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, as well as a screening of the 1967 feature “The Happening.” 

The American family comedy team known as The Marx Brothers was successful in vaudeville, on Broadway and in motion pictures from 1905 to 1949. Three films that feature appearances from the brothers are also included in this month’s screenings. National Film Registry title “Duck Soup” (added to the registry in 1990) will be introduced by Robert Bader, author of the recently published “Four of the Three Musketeers: The Marx Brothers on Stage.”

As part of the sixth annual “Mostly Lost” Silent-Film Identification Workshop held at the Packard Campus from June 15th to 17th, evening screenings of rare silent films will be open to the general public. Limited seating is available for these screenings. Prior to the “Mostly Lost” workshop, the newly restored 1919 World War I drama “Behind the Door” will be screened on Wednesday, June 14 as a tribute to the late James Cozart, a 33-year Library of Congress employee who worked on this restoration and helped to preserve thousands of films as a quality- assurance specialist. 

Programs relating to 1967’s “Summer of Love” will feature two evenings of top American and British rock acts of the 1960s from the prime-time television series “Shindig!” and the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, as well as a screening of the 1967 feature “The Happening.”

All Packard Campus programs are free and open to the public, but children 12 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Seating at the screenings is on a first-come, first-served basis. For general Packard Campus Theater information, call (540) 827-1079 ext. 79994 or (202) 707-9994. For further information on the theater and film series, visit www.loc.gov/avconservation/theater/. In case of inclement weather, call the theater information line no more than three hours before showtime to confirm cancellations.  

The Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation is a state-of-the-art facility funded as a gift to the nation by the Packard Humanities Institute. The Packard Campus is the site where the nation’s library acquires, preserves and provides access to the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of motion pictures, television programs, radio broadcasts and sound recordings (www.loc.gov/avconservation). The Packard Campus is home to more than 7 million collection items. It provides staff support for the Library of Congress National Film Preservation Board (www.loc.gov/film), the National Recording Preservation Board (www.loc.gov/rr/record/nrpb) and the national registries for film and recorded sound.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Library of Congress Packard Campus Theater Schedule

Thursday, June 1 (7:30 p.m.)
“The Best of Shindig!” 
(ABC-TV, 1964-1966)
ABC’s musical variety series “Shindig!” offered the best from American and British performers of the day.  Highlights from the show include The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, James Brown, The Beach Boys, The Supremes, The Everly Brothers, Jerry Lee Lewis, Tina Turner, The Kinks, Marvin Gaye, The Four Tops, Jackie Wilson and many more iconic figures.

 Friday, June 2 (7:30 p.m.)
“Highlights from the 1967 Monterey International Pop Festival”
The Monterey International Pop Music Festival was a three-day concert event held June 16- June 18, 1967 at the Monterey County Fairgrounds in Monterey, California with crowds estimated to be as high as 90,000 people. The program will include performances by The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Otis Redding, The Who, The Animals, Big Brother and the Holding Company featuring Janis Joplin, Jefferson Airplane, Simon and Garfunkel, Canned Heat, The Mamas and the Papas, The Byrds and Buffalo Springfield.

Saturday, June 3 (7:30 p.m.)
“The Happening” 
(Columbia, 1967)
Four bored hippies from Miami unwittingly kidnap a retired mafia kingpin turned successful businessman (Anthony Quinn) in this anti-establishment crime comedy. “The Happening” is most notable today both as one of Faye Dunaway’s earliest films and for its self-titled theme song. Recorded by The Supremes, “The Happening” became a number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 when released as a single on the Motown label. Directed by Elliot Silverstein (“Cat Ballou”), the cast also includes Michael Parks, George Maharis, Milton Berle, Robert Walker Jr. and Martha Hyer.

 Thursday, June 8 (7:30 p.m.)
“A Global Affair” (MGM, 1964)
Bob Hope stars as Frank Larrimore, an official at the United Nations in New York, who finds himself in charge of an infant who was abandoned in the building. Besides being an inexperienced bachelor having to cope with a baby, he has to determine what nationality the child will have since he was abandoned on international territory. Directed and co-written by Jack Arnold, the cast of the comedy features Liselotte Pulver, who received a best supporting actress Golden Globe nomination for her performance, Yvonne DeCarlo, Michele Mercier and John McGiver. “Hope for America: Performers, Politics and Pop Culture,” an ongoing exhibition, draws from the personal papers, joke files, films, radio and television broadcasts and other materials donated to the Library of Congress by Bob Hope and his family. The exhibit can be seen on the ground floor of the Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Building.

 Friday, June 9 (7:30 p.m.)
“Casino” (Universal, 1995 – R-rated*)
Martin Scorsese directed this crime drama about a corrupt Las Vegas casino. Robert De Niro stars as world-class gambling handicapper Sam “Ace” Rothstein; Joe Pesci as Mafia underboss Nicky Santoro and Sharon Stone as Ace’s scheming, self-absorbed wife Ginger. The film is based on the non-fiction book “Casino: Love and Honor in Las Vegas” by Nicholas Pileggi, who co-wrote the screenplay with Scorsese. Stone received an Oscar nomination for best actress. * No one under the age of 17 will be admitted without a parent or guardian.

Saturday, June 10 (2 p.m.)
“The Goonies” (Warner Bros., 1985)
Adapted by Chris Columbus from a story by Steven Spielberg, “The Goonies” follows a group of misfit kids who live in the “Goon Docks” neighborhood of Astoria, Oregon, as they try to save their homes from demolition for a country club. In the process, they discover an old Spanish map that leads them on an adventure to unearth the long-lost fortune of legendary 17th-century pirate One-Eyed Willy. This energetic family comedy-adventure features Corey Feldman, Sean Astin, Jeff Cohen, Josh Brolin and Martha Plimpton.

Wednesday, June 14 (7:30 p.m.)
“Behind the Door” (Paramount, 1919)
Described by esteemed film historian Kevin Brownlow as “the most outspoken of all the World War I vengeance films,” this shockingly graphic drama was directed by Irvin Willat and stars Hobart Bosworth as a German-American who enlists to do his patriotic duty, Jane Novak as his devoted new bride and Wallace Beery as a sadistic German U-boat commander. The film only survived in fragments until a recent restoration and reconstruction, thanks to the San Francisco Silent Film Festival, The Library of Congress, and Gosfilmofund of Russia. Prior to the screening Rob Byrne, who headed the restoration work, will discuss the film, its restoration and working with quality- assurance specialist James Cozart on the project. Cozart, who passed away on March 25, had shared that “Behind the Door” was one of his favorites. Live musical accompaniment will be provided by Ben Model.

 Thursday, June 15 (7:30 p.m.)
Silent Movie Double Feature

“Now We’re in the Air” (Paramount, 1927)
Louise Brooks appeared in 14 American films during the silent era. Five of these features are currently thought to be entirely lost, while two others survive only as fragments or incomplete copies. Following a tip from Academy Award-winning film historian Kevin Brownlow, Robert Byrne learned of a fragmentary nitrate print of the hitherto considered lost “Now We’re in the Air” (1927) stored in the vaults of Národní filmový archiv in Prague. In this presentation, Byrne will present a brief description of the project to restore and preserve what remains, followed by a screening of the entire 22-minute restoration.

 “Corporal Kate” (DeMille Pictures Corp., 1926)
Frequently cited as one of the first war films to highlight females at war, “Corporal Kate” is the story of a pair of Brooklyn manicurists who go to France during World War I to entertain the troops with a song-and-dance act. Both girls struggle not only with the brutalities of war but also with their love for the same man. This is the premiere screening of the newly preserved DeMille Pictures Corp. feature that stars Vera Reynolds, Julia Faye and Kenneth Thompson. Andrew Simpson will provide live musical accompaniment.

 Friday, June 16 (7:30 p.m.)
Horror Icon Silent-Film Screenings Presented by Kelly Robinson

“The Devil” (Mutual, 1915)
Artist Harry Lang is commissioned by a wealthy gentleman to paint a portrait of his wife, Isabella - who just happens to be Lang’s former lover. Wishing to quell gossip, Isabella connives to marry off a friend to the artist. With his knowledge of their secrets holding them in his thrall, the Devil uses his supernatural powers and trickery to play puppet-master to the love rectangle. Directed by Reginald Barker and produced by Thomas H. Ince, the film stars Edward Connelly, Bessie Barriscale and Arthur Maude.

 “The Were-Tiger” (Chesterfield Motion Pictures Corporation, 1925)
The daughter of a mine owner has harrowing adventures in her struggle to reach her father through the jungles of the Malay Peninsula. Her travel is impeded by armed men and a mysterious beast, which the natives describe as a man-eating tiger that preys on children and transforms into a human. The film was produced by William Selig and stars Hedda Nova, J. Frank Glendon, George Carrossella and Jules Cowles.

 “The Stolen Play” (General Film Company, 1917)
A blind playwright is engaged to his assistant and the two are close to completion of a new play, which is so dark and morbid that they find themselves on the brink of breakdowns. A greedy agent who has admired the playwright’s previous work, will stop at nothing to secure the play for himself. Directed by Harry Harvey, the film stars Ruth Roland, Edward J. Brady and William Conklin. Philip Carli will provide live musical accompaniment for the screenings.

 Saturday, June 17 (7:30 p.m.)
“Rogues and Romance” (Pathé Exchange, 1920)
In this lighthearted story, a young American woman vacationing with her father in Spain falls in love with a Spanish rebel whose gang has plans to kidnap the governor. When her American fiancé arrives for a visit she is torn between the two men. Photographed in Spain and Portugal, the film stars Harry Semels, June Caprice, Marguerite Courtot and George B. Seitz, who also directed.  Also on the program is “Fox Film Corporation’s 23rd Annual Convention, Hollywood, California” (1926). Live musical accompaniment will be provided by Ben Model.

 Thursday, June 22 (7:30 p.m.)
“Copacabana” (United Artists, 1947)
Groucho Marx stars, in his first film without his brothers, as two-bit theatrical agent Lionel Q. Devereaux, whose overzealous promotion of his only client -- fireball entertainer Carmen Novarro (Carmen Miranda) -- results in her being hired for two different singing jobs in two different guises at the Copacabana nightclub. Alfred E. Green directed this musical comedy. Brazilian samba singer and dancer Miranda performs several lively numbers written by Sam Coslow. Also co-starring Steve Cochran, Andy Russell and Gloria Jean.

 Friday, June 23 (7:30 p.m.)
“Room Service” (RKO, 1938)
Groucho, Chico and Harpo Marx star in this adaptation of a hit Broadway show about destitute producers trying to get a stage play, “Hail and Farewell,” produced and funded by a mysterious backer while evading paying their hotel bill. William A. Seiter directed this comedy, the only Marx Brothers film that was not written especially for the team. It also features Lucille Ball, Ann Miller and Frank Albertson. Also on the program is the 1933 short “Hollywood on Parade” which features Groucho and Chico Marx, W.C. Fields, Mae West, Jimmy Durante and a host of other prominent comedians.

 Saturday, June 24 (7:30 p.m.)
“Duck Soup” (Paramount, 1933)
Thanks to the patronage of well-heeled widow Mrs. Teasdale (Margaret Dumont), Rufus T. Firefly (Groucho Marx) becomes dictator of the tiny country of Freedonia. But when the ambassador of the bordering nation of Sylvania declares his love for Mrs. Teasdale, Firefly declares war. This raucous political satire, in which Chico, Harpo and Zeppo co-star as spies and counterspies, was directed by Leo McCarey and added to the National Film Registry in 1990. The film will be introduced by Robert Bader, author of “Four of the Three Musketeers: The Marx Brothers on Stage.”

 Thursday, June 29 (7:30 p.m.)
“The Gazebo” (MGM, 1959)
Debbie Reynolds and Glenn Ford star as a married couple who are being blackmailed in this offbeat comedy involving murder and a backyard gazebo. Based on the hit Broadway play of the same name by Alec Coppel and directed by George Marshall, the film is complemented by the performances of the cast members including John McGiver, Martin Landau, Doro Merande and Carl Reiner. Helen Rose was nominated for the Academy Award for best costume design and Reynolds sings “Something Called Love.”

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PR 17-072
2017-05-15
ISSN 0731-3527